The Candid Eye

January 4, 2010

Google and India Test the Limits of Liberty

Filed under: India,Indian Media,Indian Politics,Technology — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
Tags: , , , , ,

The rules of political speech on the Internet are usually pretty simple. In America, almost anything goes. In places like China, the censors call the shots. But in India — a boisterous democracy that’s riven by religious and ethnic tension — the game is far trickier, as Google is discovering.

In September, lawyers at Google Inc.’s New Delhi office got a tip from an Internet user about alarming content on the company’s social networking site, Orkut. People had posted offensive comments about the chief minister of India’s southern state of Andhra Pradesh, who had died just a few days earlier in a helicopter crash.

Google’s response: It removed not just the material but also the entire user group that contained it, a person familiar with the matter says. The Internet giant feared the comments could heighten tensions at a time when thousands of mourners of the popular politician were emptying into the street.

The incident shows the treacherous terrain Google must navigate as it expands in India, the world’s most-populous nation after China and a major growth market for Web searches, online advertising and mobile phone software. As Google broadens its reach, it must increasingly tweak the way it operates to suit new cultures. While authoritarian countries pose well-known challenges, Google is learning that even democracies such as India can be fraught with legal and cultural complications. Its experience here could serve as a precedent for other Web companies.

The nation of 1.2 billion is the world’s largest democracy and in principle affords free speech to its citizens. But the country has a volatile mix of religious, ethnic and caste politics and a history of mob violence. So, the government has the authority to curtail speech rights in certain cases. India’s Constitution encapsulates that gray zone: Free speech is subject to “reasonable restrictions” for such purposes as maintaining “public order, decency or morality.”

Protest against Google

Authorities say Internet companies in India, including Yahoo Inc., Facebook Inc. and Twitter, are expected to help government enforce those standards online by removing objectionable material and, occasionally, helping to track down users. Under a law that took effect in October, corporate officials from any Web site that fails to comply with requests to take down material or block sites can face a fine and a jail sentence of up to seven years.

Indian Muslims protest against postings on Google’s Orkut site.

India is a secular state, but its people are predominantly Hindu, with a large Muslim minority and significant populations of other religions. Religious and caste tensions have periodically erupted in bloodletting in the 62 years since independence from Britain. In 1992, Hindu activists destroyed a mosque that they believed to be the birthplace of the Hindu deity Rama, setting off riots that killed more than 1,000. The memory remains raw in India.

“If you are doing business here, you should follow the local law, the sentiments of the people, the culture of the country,” says Gulshan Rai, an official in the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, who is overseeing implementation of the new law. “If somebody starts abusing Lord Rama on a Web site, that could start riots,” he said.

Iqbal Chagla, a leading Indian attorney on civil liberties and public interest litigation, says fears of public rioting sparked by Web content — or incendiary content in any medium — are overstated. “Communal tensions become largely an excuse for denial of civil liberties and denial of freedom of speech,” Mr. Chagla said. “It’s a very thin line that’s being tread.”

Still, Google has learned to be wary of material that could ignite unrest, from incendiary comments about politicians such as Congress Party President Sonia Gandhi to user groups bashing revered historical or religious figures.

“In those gray areas it is really hard,” says Nicole Wong, Google’s deputy general counsel, who oversees the legal aspects of new Google product launches. “On the one hand, we believe very strongly in political speech and, on the other hand, in India they do riot and they blow up buses.”

Google’s policy, Ms. Wong says, is to review material flagged by Indian users of Orkut and other Web services it owns, such as YouTube. Google checks whether the content violates its global rules for users, which ban materials like child pornography and hate speech. The company pledges to abide by the laws of the countries it operates in. In India, that means making some content inaccessible from the local versions of its sites, such as orkut.co.in.—the default page users see when accessing Orkut from India. Google says it only blocks content brought to its attention by users or law enforcement authorities and only when it considers the request valid. The company cannot control what content is posted on third-party Web sites but controls what can be found through its search engine.

YSR Reddy's sudden death left many clueless!

The Shiv Sena, a Hindu nationalist political party in India, is known for coming down hard on its critics in the print and TV media. The group is targeting Google for content on social networking sites like Orkut.

There are several user groups on Orkut with harsh rhetoric targeting political and religious figures. One anti-Sonia Gandhi group has an “X” through her photo and describes her as “Lady Hitler,” accusing her of not supporting the cause of ethnic Tamil separatists in Sri Lanka. (Ms. Gandhi’s husband, former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, was assassinated in 1991 by a Tamil Sri Lankan extremist.) Congress Party representatives didn’t return calls seeking comment.

Google began ramping up in India in 2007 to capitalize on burgeoning Internet use. The country has about 52 million Web users, according to the International Telecommunication Union, making it one of the largest markets in the world. There is room for growth, since only about 5% of India’s population is yet online. Google declined to comment about the finances of its India operation.

Orkut, with 17.6 million users in India in October, is the country’s third-most visited Web site, according to comScore Inc. Google acknolweges that it was taken aback early on at how the site gave rise to explosive debates on topics like religion and politics. In mid-2007, the company began fielding complaints from police and users about profile pages with derogatory comments about figures living and dead. These have included B.R. Ambedkar, an architect of India’s Constitution who was an activist for lower-caste Indians, and Ms. Gandhi of the Congress Party.

Supporters of Y.S. Rajasekhara Reddy, chief minister of of India’s southern state of Andhra Pradesh, rallied in September following his death in a helicopter crash.

The Web giant ran into particularly fierce opposition from supporters of the Shiv Sena, a Hindu nationalist political party that wants to increase the influence of ethnic Marathis — natives of Maharashtra, the state that includes Mumbai.

In June 2007, Shiv Sena supporters stormed cyber cafes outside Mumbai, damaging computers and harassing owners, when they discovered postings on Orkut denigrating Balasaheb Thackeray, the group’s founder, and Chatrapati Shivaji, a 17th century warrior king revered by Marathis for battling the Mughal Empire. Google removed certain Shiv Sena-related groups at the request of local authorities.

Shailesh Patil, a spokesman for the Shiv Sena, says the group’s media division in Mumbai regularly fields complaints from the public about Orkut and YouTube and passes them to Google and local police. Last year Google removed a YouTube video that was “asking questions about Shiv Sena, and whether it is good or bad,” Mr. Patil said. “This is a country with a lot of religions and sentimental values,” he added. “If that censorship is not there, some people may utilize these mediums to disturb the harmony of the country, and it may lead to chaos.”

Mr. Patil said not every site that criticizes the Shiv Sena should be taken down, because that might just give the content more publicity. Recently, a local Web user complained about a site that allows viewers to hurl virtual tomatoes or garlands at politicians, including Mr. Thackeray. “We told people to throw more garlands, so automatically the proportion of tomatoes will go down,” Mr. Patil said. The site is no longer up.

Police in the cities of Mumbai and Pune began paying greater attention to Web content and passing complaints to Google. The Mumbai police set up an around-the-clock facility for trained staff to “cyber patrol” the Web and look for violations, while also responding to outside complaints from Internet users.

The city’s cyber enforcement efforts are much broader than Google. Officials are also tracking things like credit card fraud, pornography and hacking. But one of the nine categories of complaints Mumbai tracks is simply titled “Orkut.” Local officials said they keep an eye on other social networking sites, too, including Facebook, but Google’s site receives the most complaints and gets the most attention.

Google’s New Dehli office subsequently removed offensive material about Y.S. Rajasekhara Reddy posted on the company’s social-networking site.

“We’re trying to educate youth. Don’t think if you’re posting something wrong, no one is watching you,” said Deven Bharti, a commissioner in Mumbai police’s crime branch. “It’s just the opposite. Every footprint is being tracked. It’s easy to detect these crimes.”

Free speech is important, Mr. Bharti said, but religious, regional and caste sensitivities have to be taken into account. “You have to consider India’s peculiarities,” he said.

The police, central government officials and Google declined to comment on most specific cases in which material has been taken down. But a few have spilled into public view because the police have prosecuted alleged wrongdoers.

In May of 2008, police from Pune arrested a 22-year-old tech worker in Gurgaon, a suburb of Delhi, for content on an Orkut profile titled, “I hate Sonia Gandhi.” Google took down the material and gave the user’s IP address to police, allowing them to track down his physical whereabouts, said Chandrakant Thakur, a constable sent to make the arrest.

Google wouldn’t disclose what precisely was posted about Ms. Gandhi, but said it determined the material violated India’s obscenity laws. The company said it provided the user’s IP address only after police obtained a court order. The defendant was released on bail, and D.M. Bhandkoli, a senior inspector for cybercrime in the Pune police department, declined to comment on the status of the case.

Some Indian Web users are conflicted about how far free speech should go on the Web. “If someone wants to say anything negative about the government or politics, they should be able to express it, but they shouldn’t hurt any individual (ethnic or religious) community’s feelings,” said Gaurav Singh, a 26-year-old New Delhi resident who has been an Orkut member for two years.

Some lawyers say Google doesn’t push back much on requests to take down Orkut content. “Sometimes they are uncomfortable about it, but they tend to accede to most requests,” said Lawrence Liang, a civil liberties attorney Google consulted in 2007 when it was devising a strategy on how to deal with Orkut controversies in India.

Gitanjali Duggal, Google’s in-house litigator in India, says Google now has an organized approach. The company tries — even if doesn’t always succeed — to resist many requests to remove material. “We do have elbow room in exercising our discretion,” she said. “Literally on a daily basis we push back on these kinds of complaints.”

Ms. Duggal says she has argued to authorities that whatever is allowed in print should be allowed online. The Indian press is full of biting political commentary. Newspaper and television journalists regularly skewer public figures for being corrupt, ineffective, or soft on Pakistan, India’s rival. Ms. Duggal says there has to be something especially incendiary in Internet content to warrant intervention by Google. The company declined to provide any data on the proportion of complaints that result in content removal.

“Saying ‘I hate Shiv Sena’ is one thing, but saying ‘I Hate Shiv Sena because they hate Muslims’ is another thing,” Ms. Duggal said, because it “brings in the concept of religion.” She said Google is especially sensitive to any comments that might be seen as defamatory against a public figure, since libel in India is a criminal offense punishable by jail time.

However murky the free-speech zone in India may be, experts say the country has steered far clear of the systematic censorship of many other countries. Saudi Arabia bans Orkut entirely. China maintains what many experts believe to be the most sophisticated Web filtering system in the world, known as the “Great Firewall.”

Google’s Ms. Wong notes that in India, cultural nuances pose a different set of challenges. “India does value free speech and political speech,” she says. “But they are weighing the harm of free speech against violence in their streets.”

Source : The Wallstreet Journal

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December 21, 2009

Insurance CEO quits job to become Cong backroom boy

Excerpts from TOI with my emphasis added.

Jitendra Kumar Bhagat, who was earning around Rs 1 crore per annum at the time of his resignation. “He had a state-of-the art office, a chauffeur-driven car and almost every luxury one could think of as CEO of a company.Congress says,“he resigned to serve the people of the state”.

When asked if Bhagat is being paid what he used to get as CEO of the insurance company, State secretary M M Sharma said, “He has resigned and become a member of the party. There is no reason why he should be paid.”

Sonia Gandhi : Image Courtesy - http://www.irancartoon.ir

Sonia Gandhi : Image Courtesy - http://www.irancartoon.ir

 

When contacted, Bhagat said, “I have come here to work for the party and meet the expectations of the high command. I have nothing to say at the moment.”

Jitendra Kumar Bhagat wants people to believe that he is not getting paid for what he is doing for Congress party.Political parties have started roping in successful CEOs to work for the betterment of the party.Will they show the same enthusiasm in discharging their duties to people of India?The first act after joining the party for anyone is lying.Mr.Jitendra Kumar will soon get used to it.Like the politicians from Congress party,he will not lie and also not utter a word against those corrupt thugs.

A legacy that has been followed for more than six decades and Jitendra is not an exception.He joins the club of dutiful servents of high command like many did in the past.

He does not have to give rehearsed speeches like Manmohan Singh who said earlier that corruption is the single greatest threat to the nation’s economic prospects.

For entire news click here

December 18, 2009

Corruption retarding India’s growth says Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh, the Indian prime minister, has said that corruption is the single greatest threat to the nation’s economic prospects.

In a speech given to an anti-corruption corruption in New Delhi, Mr Singh described the damaging effect that bribes, extortion and fraud have on all levels of life in India.

Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh

He said that graft meant infrastructure projects were late, over-budget, and often poor quality, while labeling India’s opaque business practices “a fertile breeding ground for the evil of corruption.

“The pervasive corruption in our country tarnishes our image [and it] discourages investors who expect fair treatment and transparent dealings with public authorities,” he said.

The difficult task facing the country’s anti-corruption forces was emphasised when shortly afterwards judges of only two of India’s 29 states agreed to declare their assets, despite having been ordered to do so by India’s supreme court.

“What message are these judges sending out?” asked Anupama Jha, director of the Indian branch of Transparency International, an international corruption watchdog.

“Judges were once greatly respected and now these questions about judicial corruption have lowered their status. It is a sad situation.”

Nevertheless, India has the second-fastest growing economy in the world, after China.

“They would be even faster growing if they were less corrupt,” said Gareth Price, head of the Asia programme at Chatham House, a foreign policy think tank.

“The fastest growing sector of their economy is IT and that is the only sector that is completely outside the government’s control.”

He said that the history of graft in India was the product mainly of three things. “Firstly, the British bureaucratic legacy to the subcontinent. The British created so many rules that anyone could be shut down if, say, a factory inspector found that a bucket of sand was missing, making the place a ‘fire hazard’. So the inspectors would be bribed simply not to shut the place down.

“Secondly, after Independence India had a Soviet-style system of quotas, in which the licences that you received permitting you to produce a quantity of something basically determined how profitable you would be. So the government would be bribed to hand out licences.

“And the third thing is that the tax system is extraordinarily complex and condusive to corruption. Recent attempt to simplify it met with resistance mainly from business who were afraid they’d end up paying more rather than less.”

Mr Price added that graft may have become more of an issue recently due to an increase in conspicuous consumption. “Twenty years ago people in India who had wealth didn’t necessarily flaunt it.

“But over the past ten years you have seen people driving Porsches around Delhi for the first time. And if you know that someone is a civil servant and is supposed to be on a certain salary but is seen driving a Porsche, corruption becomes more of an issue.”

Source: Telegraph.co.uk

December 14, 2009

A spicy menage a trois!!

Filed under: Congress,Indian Media,Nehru — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
Tags: , , , , ,

At the stroke of the midnight hour when the world sleeps, India will awake to life and freedom.’

Those powerful words, memorable to everyone who loves India, were uttered by the father of the modern nation, Jawaharlal Nehru, when the country became independent more than 60 years ago.

Behind this famous ‘tryst with destiny’ speech lay a deeply personal fight to escape the domination of the British Raj, a struggle all the more meaningful because of Nehru’s private life.

Special relationship: Lord and Lady Mountbatten with Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru

Special relationship: Lord and Lady Mountbatten with Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru

For the handsome widower had formed a more than usually deep bond with, of all people, the beautiful wife of the chief representative of the occupying power, Edwina, Lady Mountbatten.

If you came across their romance in a novel, you would dismiss it instantly as fiction.But the fact is the couple shared an extraordinary love. Their deep attachment lasted from the moment they met in 1947 in New Delhi until the day Edwina died 13 years later.

It was such a meaningful relationship that even Lord Mountbatten himself found it best to turn a blind eye.

Nehru Edwina Smoking

Nehru Edwina Smoking

Perhaps he even encouraged it, so that he could benefit from any insight into the Indian mind that his wife could pass him at this pivotal time in their history.

This fascinating personal intrigue was to have been the basis of a new film, Indian Summer, starring Hugh Grant and Cate Blanchett as Lord and Lady Mountbatten.

But so concerned are the Indian government to protect their favourite statesman’s reputation that, after nine months of costly pre-production in Delhi, filming has been dramatically ordered to cease.

Indian politicians have demanded to see the script to know just how explicitly the relationship will be portrayed.

But what is the real story? Certainly, there are aspects of Lady Mountbatten’s early life that will shock India’s ruling elite.

The spoiled favourite granddaughter of a Jewish financier close to the royals, Edwina Ashley was the richest and most glamorous deb of her time.

Ostensibly it was the perfect match, but…..

Read the entire article here.

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November 24, 2009

Arrogant Congress, absent Opposition

There are three striking features about anniversaries. The first is their sheer arbitrariness — what, for example, is so significant about the 100 days we so love to observe? The second, and this applies mainly to societies (not India) which have a marked sense of history, is their commercial potential. The 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall proved very lucrative for publishers, just as ‘royal’ occasions in Britain are a good time for the producers of memorabilia. Finally, the decision which anniversary to observe and which to ignore is dictated by expediency and politics.

Corrupt Indian Politicians

This week India will be commemorating the first anniversary of the jihadi attack on Mumbai on November 26 last year. If initial trends are any indication, it is likely to become another occasion for media-sponsored indignation by celebrities — the spurious enough-is-enough syndrome until the fire next time. It will also be the occasion for some mindless repetition of meaningless homilies such as the mantra that “terrorists have no religion”. That their astonishing conviction stems from theology is something we can’t discuss in polite company. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, quite fortuitously, will not be there to share the popular grief over independent India’s most astounding show of ineptitude. He will be busy telling those Americans who care to listen that India harbours no ill will towards those who are determined to set our house on fire.

Despite the odd outbursts of anger at those responsible for the monumental cock-ups in Mumbai, the anniversary of 26/11 is good news for the Government. Since it is just not done to inject partisan politics into the proceedings, India will use the occasion to demonstrate its amazing resilience, the proverbial stiff upper lip we didn’t even know we had. Politically speaking, Hindu fatalism and the cheapness of human life are the best guarantees of a pernicious culture of non-accountability.

This week, however, marks another anniversary. Exactly six months ago, on May 22, Manmohan Singh was sworn in Prime Minister for a second time. It was an occasion that was greeted by most Indians with a sigh of great relief: Not because the electorate was star struck by the first innings of the UPA but because it spared India a bout of instability and Madhu Koda-type governance at the Centre. The UPA-2 assumed office with everything going for it: Continuity at the top, enhanced self-confidence of the Gandhis, a stronger Congress and weakened coalition partners and, above all, an Opposition in total disarray. The UPA-1 was a post-election construction and was prey to conflicting political pressures and blackmail. There were no mitigating factors holding back UPA-2.

Six months is too short a time to judge a Government’s performance but it is sufficient to assess the broad direction in which it is heading. It allows us to take a call on where India will find itself at the time of the 2014 poll. Sadly, the broad conclusions don’t inspire great confidence in the future of a country that believes it is a world power and doesn’t behave like one.

To begin with, there are unmistakable signs of the Government pulling in different directions and Cabinet Ministers doing their own thing. The sugar kerfuffle which led to Delhi being overrun by angry farmers was a classic example of the left hand not knowing what the right hand was up to. The contentious Ordinance was blamed on Sharad Pawar’s proximity to an organised lobby. That was always well known. Why did the Cabinet not apply its mind to the Ordinance in the first place?

Cabinet Ministers, it would seem, love doing their own thing. Mamata Banerjee has chosen to use the Railways as a parallel administration for West Bengal. Her priorities are building sports stadiums, shoring up bankrupt Bengali newspapers, giving lectures to Bengali IAS officers and even indulging Maoists; trains comes low down on her dhobi list.

Black-money-and-Corruption

Mamata, it may be said, is not under the political control of the Congress. Moreover, she has to be indulged for her undeniable success in breaching the hitherto impregnable Red bastion in West Bengal. But that rule doesn’t apply for Jairam Ramesh who appears to have put self-glory ahead of everything else. It would interest the PM to know that officials are mortified over what Ramesh may concede inside the ‘green room’ at the climate change conference in Copenhagen next month. His perception of national interests seems at odds with the national consensus.

Giving Ministers autonomy is a good thing but the Cabinet seems to be operating like a confederacy. There are pro-China Ministers, pro-America Ministers, and pro-highest bidder Ministers doing their own thing. The External Affairs Minister, on his part, is emerging as the Shivraj Patil of the UPA-2 Government. The impending Commonwealth Games fiasco epitomises the crisis triggered by a lack of direction. No wonder the Finance Minister despairs of the alarming state of public finances — the austerity drive having been quietly punctured by angry politicians. As for reforms: What reforms?

What is particularly alarming is that the collapse of the Opposition has injected into the Congress an astonishing degree of arrogance. Thus, convicted killer Manu Sharma is let out by an unfazed Delhi administration to drink in pubs and campaign for his father; Madhu Koda is handled with kid gloves because of a fear that he may talk; the scandals of A Raja are left to the media to unearth because officials can’t displease the DMK; and, as for the soaring price of food, no one is responsible.

It would have been a good time to be in the Opposition. Except that the Opposition is busy either spinning yarns or imagining that the future lies in gau, gram and, presumably, gobar. India has got the Government (and Opposition) it deserves.

Source : The Pioneer

November 6, 2009

Fearing Jagan, Congress keeps hands off Karnataka!

Source : Livemint.com

It has been a very tempting offer for Congress from the Reddy brothers — G Karunakar Reddy and G Janardhana Reddy! The mining barons from Bellary had offered the Congress party the support of 60 MLAs to topple the B.S Yeddyurappa-led Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government in Karnataka.

Reddy brothers - Image Courtesy:http://ibnlive.in.com/

Reddy brothers - Image Courtesy:http://ibnlive.in.com/

It would have been easy for Congress, which has 74 legislators in the 224-member state assembly. But Congress president Sonia Gandhi decided to reject the offer because her advisors told her that the move would strengthen Jaganmohan Reddy – son of late Andhra Pradesh chief minister Y.S. Rajashekhara Reddy – who has been pressurizing the party leadership to appoint him at the top post in the state, replacing current chief minister K. Rosaiah. Jagan Reddy and the Bellary Reddys are reportedly known to be close business associates. So, for the Congress leaders in Andhra Pradesh, a state government at the mercy of Reddy brothers in the neighboring Karnataka was an absolute ‘no no’.

The Congress leaders, who are in the know of the developments, claim that Gandhi had rejected the offer from the Reddy brothers “simply because she was not in favour of breaking a party to get power.”

Besides, Congress leaders in Karnataka also were not very keen for such a move. According to the party MLAs – who were in national capital for the last two days -, accepting Reddy brothers’ support to form a government would be “suicidal” for the Congress’ future in the state. They say such a government would not last for long as Reddy brothers are too demanding. The party, they say, is not ready for a mid-term election because it might lead to Yeddyurappa taking advantage of the “martyr image” he would acquire in the current political game. The Congress leaders also are confident that the Reddy brothers would force the BJP leadership to remove Yeddyruappa ultimately!

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July 27, 2009

Government Schemes and Projects named after Nehru-Gandhi family

Filed under: Congress,Indira Gandhi,Rahul Gandhi — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
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My friend arrived at Indira Gandhi International Airport,New Delhi last week, after finishing his research in Cambridge University under Cambridge Nehru scholarship. Recently he had come to Rajiv Gandhi university in Bangalore.He wanted to meet me in Indira Gandhi musical Fountains festival.I inquired about his new job in Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi….This is the kind of penetration,Nehru-Gandhi family has done to our lives.

Nehru-Gandhi family

Nehru-Gandhi family

Since 1947,the Nehru family has been using people’s money to market and promote their party and themselves.Though we got independence from Britishers to think and act freely,this one family has been doing all it can to influence the gullible people and their thinking and decisions.What is so interesting is,they do this in a systematic manner without much publicity.These clandestine acts of this family is getting them people’s support and sympathy without any real effort from their side.I came across these interesting details of A.Suryaprakash about the government projects and Nehru-Gandhi family’s association with those.These thousands of schemes have miserably failed to eradicate poverty among people.They have neither provided safe drinking water for all Indians nor guarded people from external/internal terrorist/maoist threats.

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – 91.88 crore.
Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – 91.52 crore
4. Rajiv Gandhi Udyami Mitra Yojana for benefit of NE entrepreneurs, Ministry of Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, Government of India,
Budgetary allocation 2008-9 – Rs. 2.70 crore
Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – Rs.1.12 crore
5. Indira Awas Yojana, Ministry of Rural Areas and Environment – IAY is a CSS funded on cost-sharing basis between the Centre and the States in the ratio of 75:25. In the case of UTs, the entire funds are provided by Centre. The target groups for housing under IAY are households below poverty line living in rural areas, particularly those belonging to SC/ST and freed bonded labourers.
Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – Rs. 7919.00 crores
Budgetary allocation  2009-10 – Rs.7914.70 crores
6. Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme – objective to provide social security to workers in the unorganized sector in a phased manner. Budgetary allocation in 2008-09 is Rs. 3,443 crore
7. Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission, Ministry of Urban Development,
Govt. of India – 7 years time frame, 50,000 cr.
Budgetary allocation for 2008 – 9 – 10447.98 crore
Budgetary allocation for 2009-10 – 10713.84 crore
8. Jawaharlal Nehru Rojgar Yojna – Ministry of Labour and Employment – A Self- employment programme for urban poor
9. Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Kalyan Yojna, Employees’ State Insurance Corporation
10. Indira Gandhi Canal Project, Funded by World Bank
11. Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojana, Union Ministry of Textiles, in
association with ICICI Lombard General Insurance Company Limited
12. Indira Vikas Patra
State Government Schemes
1. Rajiv Gandhi Rehabilitation Package for Tsunami Affected Areas, Govt. of Tamil Nadu, Budgetary Allocation Rs.2347.19 crores
2. Rajiv Gandhi Social Security Scheme for poor people, Department of Revenue and Disaster Management, Govt. of Puducherry
3. Rajiv Ratna Awas Yojna – Congress party president and United Progressive Alliance (UPA) Chairperson Sonia Gandhi had announced that the Centre would give a package of Rs.1,500-crore for providing housing facilities to the poorer sections in Delhi, thus announcing the scheme.
4. Rajiv Gandhi Prathamik Shiksha Mission , Raigarh
5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Madhya Pradesh
6. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Food Security , Madhya Pradesh
7. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh
8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited is a Government Company established by the Government of Karnataka to cater to the housing needs of the Economically and Socially weaker sections of the society.  Registered in April 2000, its authorised Capital is Rs.10 crores with Rs.3 crore  paid up.
9. Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Development Mission, Rajasthan
10. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Literacy Programme, Assam
11. Rajiv Gandhi Swavlamban Rojgar Yojana, Govt. of NCT of Delhi
12. Rajiv Gandhi Mobile Aids Counseling and Testing Services, Rajiv Gandhi Foundation
13. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyarthi Suraksha Yojana, Maharashtra
14. Rajiv Gandhi Mission for Water Shed Management, M.P.
15. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission for Tribal Areas, MP
16. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry
17. Rajiv Gandhi Breakfast Scheme, Pondicherry
18. Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Divas, Punjab
19. Rajiv Gandhi Artisans Health and Life Insurance Scheme, Tamil Nadu
20. Rajiv Gandhi Zopadpatti and Nivara Prakalpa, Mumbai
21. Rajiv Arogya Sri programme , Gujrat State Govt. Scheme
22. Rajiv Gandhi Abhyudaya Yojana, AP
23. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Saksharta Mission, Jabalpur
24. Rajiv Gandhi Bridges and Roads Infrastructure Development Programme for the construction of new roads and bridges and strengthening of the existing ones in the state of Haryana
25. Rajiv Gandhi Gramin Niwara Prakalp, Maharashtra Govt.
26. Indira Gandhi Utkrishtha Chhattervritti Yojna for Post Plus Two Students, Himachal Pradesh Government Scheme, Sponsored by, Central Government
27. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme, Maharashtra Govt.
28. Indira Gandhi Prathisthan, Housing and Urban Planning Department, UP Govt
29. Indira Kranthi Patham Scheme, Andhra Pradesh
30. Indira Gandhi Nahar Pariyojana, State Govt. Scheme
31. Indira Gandhi Vruddha Bhumiheen Shetmajoor Anudan Yojana, Govt. of
Maharashtra
32. Indira Gandhi Nahar Project  (IGNP), Jaisalmer, Govt. of Rajasthan
33. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Yojna, Govt. of Maharashtra
34. Indira Gandhi kuppam, State Govt. Welfare Scheme for Tsunami effected
fishermen
35. Indira Gandhi Drinking Water Scheme-2006, Haryana Govt.
36. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Old, Landless, Destitute women farm labour Scheme,
Maharashtra Govt.
37. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme , Maharashtra Govt.
38. Indira Gaon Ganga Yojana, Chattisgarh
39. Indira Sahara Yojana , Chattisgarh
40. Indira Soochna Shakti Yojana, Chattisgarh
41. Indira Gandhi Balika Suraksha Yojana , HP
42. Indira Gandhi Garibi Hatao Yojana (DPIP), MP
43. Indira Gandhi super thermal power project , Haryana Govt.
44. Indira Gandhi Water Project, Haryana Govt.
45. Indira Gandhi Sagar Project , Bhandara District Gosikhurd Maharashtra
46. Indira Jeevitha Bima Pathakam, AP Govt
47. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshani Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.
48. Indira Mahila Yojana Scheme, Meghalaya Govt
49. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, Chhattisgarh Govt.
50. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.
51. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, The government of Andhra Pradesh helped most of the respondent families in acquiring female calves through this scheme.
52. Indira Gandhi Landless Agriculture Labour scheme, Maharashtra Govt.
Sports/Tournaments/Trophies
1. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup Kabaddi Tournament
2. Rajiv Gandhi Sadbhavana Run
3. Rajiv Gandhi Federation Cup boxing championship
4. Rajiv Gandhi International tournament (football)
5. NSCI – Rajiv Gandhi road races, New Delhi
6. Rajiv Gandhi Boat Race, Kerala
7. Rajiv Gandhi International Artistic Gymnastic Tournament
8. Rajiv Gandhi Kabbadi Meet
9. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Roller Skating Championship
10. Rajiv Gandhi memorial marathon race, New Delhi
11. Rajiv Gandhi International Judo Championship, Chandigarh
12. Rajeev Gandhi Memorial Trophy for the Best College, Calicut
13. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Cricket Tournament, Initiated by Rahul Gandhi in Amethi
14. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup (U-21), football
15. Rajiv Gandhi Trophy (football)
16.    Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Sportspersons
17.   All Indira Rajiv Gandhi Basketball (Girls) Tournament, organized by Delhi
State
18. All India Rajiv Gandhi Wrestling Gold Cup, organized by Delhi State
19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Jhopadpatti Football Tournament, Rajura
20. Rajiv Gandhi International Invitation Gold Cup Football Tournament, Jamshedpur
21. Rajiv Gandhi Mini Olympics, Mumbai
22. Rajiv Gandhi Beachball Kabaddi Federation
23. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Trophy Prerana Foundation
24. International Indira Gandhi Gold Cup Tournament
25. Indira Gandhi International Hockey Tournament
26. Indira Gandhi Boat Race
27. Jawaharlal Nehru International Gold Cup Football Tournament.
28. Jawaharlal Nehru Hockey Tournament.
Stadia
1. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Delhi
2. Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium, New Delhi
3. Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, New Delhi
4. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Stadium, Bawana
5. Rajiv Gandhi National Football Academy, Haryana
6. Rajiv Gandhi AC Stadium, Vishakhapatnam
7. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Pondicherry
8. Rajiv Gandhi Stadium, Nahariagun, Itanagar
9. Rajiv Gandhi Badminton Indoor Stadium, Cochin
10. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Kadavanthra,Ernakulam
11. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Complex , Singhu
12. Rajib Gandhi Memorial Sports Complex, Guwahati
13. Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad
14. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Cochin
15. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh
16. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Una, Himachal Pradesh
17. Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Vishakhapatnam
18. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Deogarh, Rajasthan
19. Gandhi Stadium, Bolangir, Orissa
Airports/ Ports
1. Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, New Hyderabad, A.P.
2. Rajiv Gandhi Container Terminal, Cochin
3. Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi
4. Indira Gandhi Dock, Mumbai
5. Jawaharlal Nehru Nava Sheva Port Trust, Mumbai
Total budgetary plan outlay 2008-9  – 69.92crore
Total budgetary plan outlay 2009-10 – 324 crore
Universities/Education Institutes
1. Rajiv Gandhi Indian Institute of Management, Shilong
2. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Ranchi, Jharkhand
3. Rajiv Gandhi Technical University, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.
4. Rajiv Gandhi School of Intellectual Property Law, Kharagpur, Kolkata
5. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Secundrabad
6. Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law, Patiala, Punjab
7. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 1.50 crore
Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 3.00 crore
8. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Begumpet, Hyderabad, A.P
9. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam, Kerala
10. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering Research & Technology, Chandrapur, Maharashtra
11. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Airoli, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra
12. Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh
13. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Chola Nagar, Bangalore, Karnataka
14. Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.
15. Rajiv Gandhi D.e.d. College, Latur, Maharashtra
16. Rajiv Gandhi College, Shahpura, Bhopal
17. Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies, New Delhi
18. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Raebareli, U.P.
19. Rajiv Gandhi Homeopathic Medical College, Bhopal, M.P.
20. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Post Graduate Studies, East Godavari District, A.P.
21. Rajiv Gandhi College of Education, Thumkur, Karnataka
22. Rajiv Gandhi College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu
23. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of IT and Biotechnology, Bhartiya Vidhyapeeth
24. Rajiv Gandhi High School, Mumbai, Maharashtra
25. Rajiv Gandhi Group of Institutions, Satna, M.P.
26. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur, Tamil Nadu
27. Rajiv Gandhi Biotechnology Centre, R.T.M., Nagpur University
28. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
29. Rajiv Gandhi Mahavidyalaya, Madhya Pradesh
30. Rajiv Gandhi Post Graduate College, Allahabad, U.P.
31. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka
32. Rajiv Gandhi Govt. PG Ayurvedic College, Poprola, Himachal Pradesh
33. Rajiv Gandhi College, Satna, M.P.
34. Rajiv Gandhi Academy for Aviation Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
35. Rajiv Gandhi Madhyamic Vidyalaya, Maharashtra
36. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Contemporary Studies, Islamabad, Pakistan
37. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship
38. Rajiv Gandhi Industrial Training Centre, Gandhinagar
39. Rajiv Gandhi University of Knowledge Technologies, Andhra Pradesh
40. Rajiv Gandhi Institute Of Distance Education, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
41. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture , Tamil Nadu
42. Rajiv Gandhi University (Arunachal University), A.P.
43. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Medicine Centre (RGSMC), Kerela
44. Rajiv Gandhi Science Centre, Mauritus
45. Rajiv Gandhi Kala Mandir, Ponda, Goa
46. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyalaya, Mulund, Mumbai
47. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Polytechnic, Bangalore, Karnataka
48. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Circle Telecom Training Centre (India), Chennai
49. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Kasagod, Kerala
50. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College Of Aeronautics, Jaipur
51. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial First Grade College, Shimoga
52. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College of Education, Jammu & Kashmir
53. Rajiv Gandhi South Campus, Barkacha, Varanasi
54. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Teacher’s Training College, Jharkhand
55. Rajiv Gandhi Degree College, Rajahmundry, A.P.
56. Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), New Delhi
57. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development & Research, Mumbai, Maharashtra
58. Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy, Dehradun
59. Indira Gandhi RashtriyaUran Akademi, Fursatganj Airfield, Rae Bareli, Uttar Pradesh
60. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai
61. Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Orissa
62. Indira Gandhi B.Ed. College, Mangalore
63. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Education, Nanded, Maharashtra
64. Indira Gandhi Balika Niketan B.ED. College, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan
65. Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur, Madhya Pradesh
66. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Engineering, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra
67. Smt. Indira Gandhi Colelge, Tiruchirappalli
68. Indira Gandhi Engineering College, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh
69. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kashmere Gate, Delhi
70. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Sarang, Dist. Dhenkanal, Orissa
71. Indira Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Pune, Maharashtra
72. Indira Gandhi Integral Education Centre, New Delhi
73. Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, Delhi University, Delhi
74. Indira Gandhi High School, Himachal
75. Indira Kala Sangit Vishwavidyalaya, Chhattisgarh
76. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
77. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Andhra Pradesh
78. Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, Uttarakashi
79. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Business Management, Vikram University
80. Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
81. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore
82. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, AP
83. Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra
84. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced Scientific Research, a deemed university, Jakkur, P.O. Bangalore
85. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Social Studies, affiliated to Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapith (Pune, Maharashtra)
86. Jawaharlal Nehru College of Aeronautics & Applied Sciences, Coimbatore, (ESTD 1968)
87. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Katraj, Dhankwdi, Pune, Maharashtra
88. Kamal Kishore Kadam’s Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra
89. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Education & Technological Research, Nanded, Maharashra
90. Jawaharlal Nehru College, Aligarh
91. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad
92. Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Jabalpur
93. Jawaharlal Nehru B.Ed. College, Kota, Rajasthan
94. Jawaharlal Nehru P.G. College, Bhopal
95. Jawaharlal Nehru Government Engineering College, Sundernagar, District Mandi, H.P.
96. Jawaharlal Nehru PublicSchool, Kolar Road, Bhopal
97. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kakinada, A.P.
98. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Ibrahimpatti, Andhra Pradesh
Awards
1.   Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Achievement
2.   Rajiv Gandhi Shiromani Award
3.   Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Awards, Delhi Labour Welfare Board
4.   Rajiv Gandhi National Sadbhavana Award
5.   Rajiv Gandhi Manav Seva Award
6.   Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Conservation Award
7.   Rajiv Gandhi National Award Scheme for Original Book Writing
on Gyan Vigyan
8.   Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award
9.   Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award, Instituted by Bureau of
Indian Standards in 1991
10.   Rajiv Gandhi Environment Award for Clean Technology, Ministry
of Environment & Forest, Govt. of India
11.   RajivGandhi Travelling Scholarship
12.   Rajiv Gandhi(UK) Foundation Scholarship
13.   Rajiv Gandhi Film Awards (Mumbai)
14.   Rajiv Gandhi Khelratna Puraskar
15.   Rajiv Gandhi Parisara Prashasti, Karnataka
16.   RajivGandhi Vocational Excellence Awards
17.   Rajiv Gandhi Excellence award
18.   Indira Gandhi Peace Prize
19.   Indira Gandhi Prize for National Integration
20.   Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Award
21.   Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Awards, Ministry of
Environment   and Forests
22.    Indira Gandhi Memorial National Award forBest Environmental
& Ecological
23.    Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Purashkar
24.    Indira Gandhi NSS Award
25.    Indira Gandhi Award for National Integration
26.    Indira Gandhi Official Language Award Scheme
27. Indira Gandhi Award for Best First Film
28. Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Awards for The Town Official Language
29. Indira Gandhi Prize” for Peace, Disarmament and Development
30. Indira Gandhi Prize for Popularization of Science
31. Implementation
32. Indira Gandhi Shiromani Award
33. Indira Gandhi NSS Award/National Youth
34. Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Pushar award – search n correct
35. Indira Gandhi N.S.S Awards
36. Indira Gandhi award for social service, MP Govt.
37.    Post Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship Scheme
38.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Award Scheme
39.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Shield Scheme
40.    Indira Gandhi Vision of Wildlife Conservation Zoo, a seminar organized by
Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy.
41. Jawaharlal Nehru award for International peace worth Rs 15 lakh cash given to many international figures, every year, including Yasser Arafat of Palestine Liberation Front in 1988 and U Thant in 1965.
42. Soviet Land Nehru Award, a cash prize of Rs. 20,000 given to Shyam Benegal in Dec 89, in recognition of the above film.
43. Jawaharlal Nehru Balkalyan awards of Rs.10,000 each to 10 couples by Govt. of Maharashtra (ToI-28-4-89).
44. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi, for Academic Achievement
45. Jawaharlal Nehru birth centenary research award for energy
46. Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding
47. Nehru Bal Samiti Bravery Awards
48. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medal
49. Jawaharlal Nehru Prize” from 1998-99, to be given to organizations (preferably   NGOs) for Popularization of Science.
50. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Competition
51. Jawarharlal Nehru Student Award for research project of evolution of DNA
Scholarship / Fellowship
1. Rajiv Gandhi Scholarship Scheme for Students with Disabilities
2. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for SC/ST Candidates, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
Budgetary Allocation for 2008-9 – 26.40 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 23.70 crores
3. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for ST Candidates
Budgetary Allocation for 2008-09 – 29.00 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 42.00 crores
4. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, IGNOU
5. Rajiv Gandhi Science Talent Research Fellows
6. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, Ministry of Tribal Affairs
Budgetary Allocation for  2008-9  – 16.00 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 22.50  crores
7. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for scheduled castes and scheduled          tribes candidates given by University Grants Commission
8. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship sponsored by the Commonwealth of Learning in           association with Indira Gandhi National Open University
9. Rajiv Gandhi science talent research fellowship given by Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced scientific research (to promote budding scientists) done in tandem with Department of Science and Technology and Rajiv Gandhi Foundation
10. Rajiv Gandhi HUDCO Fellowships in the Habitat Sector (to promote research in the field of sustainable Habitat development) for MPhil, {PhD Students for 2 to 3 years, conferred by HUDCO
11. Indira Gandhi Memorial Fellowships check
12. Fullbright scholarship now renamed Fullbright- Jawaharlal Nehru Scholarship
13. Cambridge Nehru Scholarships, 10 in number, for research at Cambridge University, London, leading to Ph. D. for 3 years, which include fee, maintenance allowance, air travel to UK and back.
14. Scheme of Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowships for Post-graduate Studies, Govt. of India.
15. Nehru Centenary (British) Fellowships/Awards
National Parks/ Sanctuaries/ Museums
1. Rajiv Gandhi (Nagarhole) Wildlife Sanctury, Karnataka
2. Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Sanctury, Andhra Pradesh
3. Indira Gandhi National Park, Tamil Nadu
4. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , New Delhi
5. Indira Gandhi National Park, Anamalai Hills on Western Ghats
6. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park, Vishakhapatnam
7. Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (IGRMS)
8. Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary, Pollachi
9. Rajiv Gandhi Health Museum
10. The Rajiv Gandhi Museum of Natural History
11. Indira Gandhi Memorial museum, New Delhi
12. Jawaharlal Nehru museum in Aurangabad, Maharashtra opened by state govt.
13. Jawaharlal Nehru memorial Gallery, London
14. Jawaharlal Nehru planetarium, Worli, Mumbai.
15. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Exhibition for Children
Hospitals/Medical Institutions
1. Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science, Bangalore, Karnataka
2. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi
3. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry
4. Shri Rajiv Gandhi college of Dental Science & Hospital,  Bangalore, Karnataka
5. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Bio Technology, Thiruvanthapuram, Kerala
6. Rajiv Gandhi College of Nursing, Bangalore, Karnataka
7. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Raichur
8. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases, Bangalore, Karnataka
9. Rajiv Gandhi Paramedical College, Jodhpur
10. Rajiv Gandhi Medical College, Thane, Mumbai
11. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Karnataka
12. Rajiv Gandhi Hospital, Goa
13. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh
14. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Delhi
15. Rajiv Gandhi Homoeaopathic Medical College, Chinar Park, Bhopal, M.P
16. North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences , Shilong, Meghalaya
17. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
18. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore
19. Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sheikhpura, Patna
20. The Indira Gandhi Paediatric Hospital, Afghanistan
21. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health Hospital, Dharmaram College, Bangalore
22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Heath, Bangalore
23. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
24. Indira Gandhi Institute of Dental Science, Kerala
25. Indira Gandhi Memorial Ayurvedic Medical College & Hospital, Bhubaneshwar
26. Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur
27. Indira Gandhi Eye Hospital And Research Centre, Kolkata
28. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Shimla
29. Indira Gandhi Women and Children Hospital , Bhopla
30. Indira Gandhi Gas Relief hospital, Bhopal
31. Kamla Nehru Hospital, Shimla
32. Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya
33. Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research
(JIPMER), Puducherry
Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 127.84 crores
Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 117.51 crores
34. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Bhopal
35. Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College in Raipur.
36. Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College & Hospital, New Delhi
37. Nehru, Science Centre, Worli, Mumbai
38. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, Bhopal
39. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Homoeopathic Medical Sciences,
Maharashtra
Institutions / Chairs / Festivals
1.    Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development. (RGNIYD), Ministry of
Youth and Sports
2. Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute, Faridabad, Haryana
3. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission in Tribal Areas
4. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development
5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Chhattisgarh
6. Rajiv Gandhi Chair Endowment established in 1998 to create a Chair of South
Asian Economics
7. Rajiv Gandhi Project – A pilot to provide Education thru Massive Satellite
Connectivity up grassroot Level
8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited (Government of Karnataka
Enterprise)
9. Rajiv Gandhi Information and Technology Commission
10. Rajiv Gandhi Chair for Peace and Disarmament
11. Rajiv Gandhi Music Festival
12.   Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Lecture
13.    Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Diwas
14.    Rajiv Gandhi Education Foundation, Kerala
15.    Rajiv Gandhi Panchayati Raj Convention
16. The Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Educational and Charitable Society, Kasagod,
Kerala
17. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial trophy ekankika spardha, Prerana Foundation, Kari
Road
18. Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, Janpath, New Delhi
19. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj & Gramin Vikas Sansthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan
20. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam
21. Indira Gandhi  Institute for Development and Research , Mumbai
22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Cardiology (IGIC), Patna
23. Indira Gandhi National Center for the Arts, New Delhi
24. Indira Gandhi National Foundation, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
25. Indira Gandhi Mahila Sahakari Soot Girani Ltd, Maharashtra
26.    Indira Gandhi Conservation Monitoring Centre , Ministry of Environment &
Forest
27.    Post-Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship for Single Girl Child
28.    Jawahar Shetkari Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd.
29. Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan
30.    Jawaharlal Nehru Centenary celebrations
31.    Postal stamps of different denominations and one Rupee coins in memory of
Jawaharlal Nehru.
32.    Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Trust (U.K.) Scholarships
33. Jawaharlal Nehru Custom House Nhava Sheva, Maharashtra
34. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore
35. Jawaharlal Nehru Cultural Centre, Embassy of India, Moscow
36. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Udyog Kendra for Juveniles, Pune, Maharastra
37. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru college of agriculture and research institute ,
Pondicherry
Roads/Buildings/places
1. Rajiv Chowk, Delhi
2. Rajiv Gandhi Bhawan, Safdarjung, New Delhi
3. Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, New Delhi
4. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Kalkaji, Delhi
5. Indira Chowk, New Delhi
6. Nehru Planetarium, New Delhi
7. Nehru Yuvak Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi
8. Nehru Nagar, New Delhi
9. Nehru Place, New Delhi
10. Nehru Park, New Delhi Nehru House, BSZ Marg, New Delhi
11. Jawaharlal Nehru Government House New Delhi
12. Rajiv Gandhi Renewable Energy Park, Gurgaon, Haryana
13. Rajiv Gandhi Chowk, Andheri, Mumbai
14. Indira Gandhi Road, Mumbai
15. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Wadala, Mumbai
16. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Mulund, Mumbai
17. Nehru Nagar, Kurla, Mumbai
18. Jawaharlal Nehru gardens at Thane, Mumbai
19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Hall, Chennai
20. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Vadapalani, Chennai, Tamilnadu
21. Rajiv Gandhi Salai (Old Mahabalipuram road named after Rajiv Gandhi)
22. Rajiv Gandhi Education City, Haryana
23. Mount Rajiv, a peak in Himalaya
24. Rajiv Gandhi IT Habitat, Goa
25. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Chennai
26. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Vijayawada
27. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar in Coimbatore,  Tamil Nadu
28. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Trichy, Tamil Nadu
29. Rajiv Gandhi IT Park, Hinjewadi, Pune
30. Rajiv Gandhi Panchayat Bhav , Palanpur  Banaskantha
31. Rajiv Gandhi Chandigarh Technology Park, Chandigarh
32. Rajiv Gandhi Smriti Van, Jharkhand
33. Rajiv Gandhi statue, Panaji, Goa
34. Rajiv Gandhi Road, Chittoor
35. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial at Sriperumbudur
36. Indira Gandhi Memorial Library, University of Hyderabad
37. Indira Gandhi Musical Fountains, Bangalore
38. Indira Gandhi Planetarium , Lucknow
39. Indira Gandhi Centre for Indian Culture (IGCIC), High Commission of India, Mauritus
40. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , Eastern Ghats of India
41. Indira Gandhi Canal, Ramnagar, Jaisalmer
42. Indira Gandhi Industrial Complex, Ranipet, Vellore District
43. Indira Gandhi Park, Itanagar
44. Indira Gandhi Squiare , Pondicherry
45. Indira Gandhi Road, Willingdon Island, Cochin
46. Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden, Kashmir
47. Indira Gandhi Sagar Dam, Nagpur
48. Indira Gandhi bridge, Rameshvar, Tamil Nadu
49. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Bhiwandi Nizampur Municipal Corporation
50. Indira Gandhi memorial cultural Complex, UP Govt.
51. Indira Gandhi Sports Stadium , Rohru District, Shimla
52. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj Sansthan , Bhopal
53. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Rajasthan
54. Indira Nagar, Lucknow
55. Roads are named after Jawaharlal Nehru in many cities e.g. in Jaipur, Nagpur, Vile Parle, Ghatkopar, Mulund etc.
56. Nehru Nagar, Ghaziabad
57. Jawaharlal Nehru Gardens, Ambarnath
58. Jawarharlal Nehru Gardens, Panhala
59. Jawaharlal Nehru market, Jammu.
60. Jawaharlal Nehru Tunnel on the Jammu Srinagar Highway
61. Nehru Chowk, Ulhas Nagar, Maharashtra.
62. Nehru Bridge on the river Mandvi, Panaji, Goa
63. Nehru Nagar Ghaziabad
64. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Dharmatala, Kolkata
65. Nehru Road, Guwahati
66. Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur
67. Nehru Vihar Colony, Kalyanpur, Lucknow
68. Nehru Nagar, Patna
69. Jawaharlal Nehru Street, Pondicherry
70. Nehru Bazaar, Madanapalli, Tirupathi
71. Nehru Chowk, Bilaspur. M.P
72. Nehru Street, Ponmalaipatti, Tiruchirapalli
73. Nehru Nagar, S.M. Road, Ahmedabad
74. Nehru Nagar,. Nashik Pune Road

The following are some of the Government Schemes and Projects that have been named after the Nehru-Gandhi family.

Central Government Schemes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana, Ministry of Power – A scheme “Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana” for Rural Electricity Infrastructure and Household Electrification was launched for the attainment of the National Common Minimum Programme of providing access to electricity to all Rural Household by 2009. Rural Electrification Corporation (REC) is the nodal agency for the scheme. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana to be continued during the Eleventh Plan period with a capital subsidy of Rs. 28000 Crore; allocation of Rs 5500 crore for FY09.

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (RGNDWM), Ministry of Rural Development, Annual allocation plan 2007-08 was Rs.6,400 crore and Annual allocation plan 2008-09 is Rs.7,300 crore.

3. Rajiv Gandhi National Crèche Scheme for the Children of Working Mothers, Department of Women & Child Development, Ministry of HRD, New Delhi,

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – 91.88 crore.

Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – 91.52 crore

4. Rajiv Gandhi Udyami Mitra Yojana for benefit of NE entrepreneurs, Ministry of Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, Government of India,

Budgetary allocation 2008-9 – Rs. 2.70 crore

Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – Rs.1.12 crore

5. Indira Awas Yojana, Ministry of Rural Areas and Environment – IAY is a CSS funded on cost-sharing basis between the Centre and the States in the ratio of 75:25. In the case of UTs, the entire funds are provided by Centre. The target groups for housing under IAY are households below poverty line living in rural areas, particularly those belonging to SC/ST and freed bonded labourers.

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – Rs. 7919.00 crores

Budgetary allocation  2009-10 – Rs.7914.70 crores

6. Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme – objective to provide social security to workers in the unorganized sector in a phased manner. Budgetary allocation in 2008-09 is Rs. 3,443 crore

7. Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission, Ministry of Urban Development,

Govt. of India – 7 years time frame, 50,000 cr.

Budgetary allocation for 2008 – 9 – 10447.98 crore

Budgetary allocation for 2009-10 – 10713.84 crore

8. Jawaharlal Nehru Rojgar Yojna – Ministry of Labour and Employment – A Self- employment programme for urban poor

9. Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Kalyan Yojna, Employees’ State Insurance Corporation

10. Indira Gandhi Canal Project, Funded by World Bank

11. Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojana, Union Ministry of Textiles, in association with ICICI Lombard General Insurance Company Limited

12. Indira Vikas Patra

State Government Schemes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Rehabilitation Package for Tsunami Affected Areas, Govt. of Tamil Nadu, Budgetary Allocation Rs.2347.19 crores

2. Rajiv Gandhi Social Security Scheme for poor people, Department of Revenue and Disaster Management, Govt. of Puducherry

3. Rajiv Ratna Awas Yojna – Congress party president and United Progressive Alliance (UPA) Chairperson Sonia Gandhi had announced that the Centre would give a package of Rs.1,500-crore for providing housing facilities to the poorer sections in Delhi, thus announcing the scheme.

4. Rajiv Gandhi Prathamik Shiksha Mission , Raigarh

5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Madhya Pradesh

6. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Food Security , Madhya Pradesh

7. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh

8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited is a Government Company established by the Government of Karnataka to cater to the housing needs of the Economically and Socially weaker sections of the society.  Registered in April 2000, its authorised Capital is Rs.10 crores with Rs.3 crore  paid up.

9. Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Development Mission, Rajasthan

10. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Literacy Programme, Assam

11. Rajiv Gandhi Swavlamban Rojgar Yojana, Govt. of NCT of Delhi

12. Rajiv Gandhi Mobile Aids Counseling and Testing Services, Rajiv Gandhi Foundation

13. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyarthi Suraksha Yojana, Maharashtra

14. Rajiv Gandhi Mission for Water Shed Management, M.P.

15. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission for Tribal Areas, MP

16. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry

17. Rajiv Gandhi Breakfast Scheme, Pondicherry

18. Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Divas, Punjab

19. Rajiv Gandhi Artisans Health and Life Insurance Scheme, Tamil Nadu

20. Rajiv Gandhi Zopadpatti and Nivara Prakalpa, Mumbai

21. Rajiv Arogya Sri programme , Gujrat State Govt. Scheme

22. Rajiv Gandhi Abhyudaya Yojana, AP

23. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Saksharta Mission, Jabalpur

24. Rajiv Gandhi Bridges and Roads Infrastructure Development Programme for the construction of new roads and bridges and strengthening of the existing ones in the state of Haryana

25. Rajiv Gandhi Gramin Niwara Prakalp, Maharashtra Govt.

26. Indira Gandhi Utkrishtha Chhattervritti Yojna for Post Plus Two Students, Himachal Pradesh Government Scheme, Sponsored by, Central Government

27. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme, Maharashtra Govt.

28. Indira Gandhi Prathisthan, Housing and Urban Planning Department, UP Govt

29. Indira Kranthi Patham Scheme, Andhra Pradesh

30. Indira Gandhi Nahar Pariyojana, State Govt. Scheme

31. Indira Gandhi Vruddha Bhumiheen Shetmajoor Anudan Yojana, Govt. of Maharashtra

32. Indira Gandhi Nahar Project  (IGNP), Jaisalmer, Govt. of Rajasthan

33. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Yojna, Govt. of Maharashtra

34. Indira Gandhi kuppam, State Govt. Welfare Scheme for Tsunami effected fishermen

35. Indira Gandhi Drinking Water Scheme-2006, Haryana Govt.

36. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Old, Landless, Destitute women farm labour Scheme,

Maharashtra Govt.

37. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme , Maharashtra Govt.

38. Indira Gaon Ganga Yojana, Chattisgarh

39. Indira Sahara Yojana , Chattisgarh

40. Indira Soochna Shakti Yojana, Chattisgarh

41. Indira Gandhi Balika Suraksha Yojana , HP

42. Indira Gandhi Garibi Hatao Yojana (DPIP), MP

43. Indira Gandhi super thermal power project , Haryana Govt.

44. Indira Gandhi Water Project, Haryana Govt.

45. Indira Gandhi Sagar Project , Bhandara District Gosikhurd Maharashtra

46. Indira Jeevitha Bima Pathakam, AP Govt

47. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshani Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.

48. Indira Mahila Yojana Scheme, Meghalaya Govt

49. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, Chhattisgarh Govt.

50. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.

51. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, The government of Andhra Pradesh helped most of the respondent families in acquiring female calves through this scheme.

52. Indira Gandhi Landless Agriculture Labour scheme, Maharashtra Govt.

Sports/Tournaments/Trophies 

1. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup Kabaddi Tournament

2. Rajiv Gandhi Sadbhavana Run

3. Rajiv Gandhi Federation Cup boxing championship

4. Rajiv Gandhi International tournament (football)

5. NSCI – Rajiv Gandhi road races, New Delhi

6. Rajiv Gandhi Boat Race, Kerala

7. Rajiv Gandhi International Artistic Gymnastic Tournament

8. Rajiv Gandhi Kabbadi Meet

9. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Roller Skating Championship

10. Rajiv Gandhi memorial marathon race, New Delhi

11. Rajiv Gandhi International Judo Championship, Chandigarh

12. Rajeev Gandhi Memorial Trophy for the Best College, Calicut

13. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Cricket Tournament, Initiated by Rahul Gandhi in Amethi

14. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup (U-21), football

15. Rajiv Gandhi Trophy (football)

16. Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Sportspersons

17. All Indira Rajiv Gandhi Basketball (Girls) Tournament, organized by Delhi State

18. All India Rajiv Gandhi Wrestling Gold Cup, organized by Delhi State

19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Jhopadpatti Football Tournament, Rajura

20. Rajiv Gandhi International Invitation Gold Cup Football Tournament, Jamshedpur

21. Rajiv Gandhi Mini Olympics, Mumbai

22. Rajiv Gandhi Beachball Kabaddi Federation

23. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Trophy Prerana Foundation

24. International Indira Gandhi Gold Cup Tournament

25. Indira Gandhi International Hockey Tournament

26. Indira Gandhi Boat Race

27. Jawaharlal Nehru International Gold Cup Football Tournament.

28. Jawaharlal Nehru Hockey Tournament.

Stadia

1. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Delhi

2. Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium, New Delhi

3. Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, New Delhi

4. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Stadium, Bawana

5. Rajiv Gandhi National Football Academy, Haryana

6. Rajiv Gandhi AC Stadium, Vishakhapatnam

7. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Pondicherry

8. Rajiv Gandhi Stadium, Nahariagun, Itanagar

9. Rajiv Gandhi Badminton Indoor Stadium, Cochin

10. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Kadavanthra,Ernakulam

11. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Complex , Singhu

12. Rajib Gandhi Memorial Sports Complex, Guwahati

13. Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad

14. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Cochin

15. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh

16. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Una, Himachal Pradesh

17. Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Vishakhapatnam

18. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Deogarh, Rajasthan

19. Gandhi Stadium, Bolangir, Orissa

Airports/ Ports

1. Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, New Hyderabad, A.P.

2. Rajiv Gandhi Container Terminal, Cochin

3. Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi

4. Indira Gandhi Dock, Mumbai

5. Jawaharlal Nehru Nava Sheva Port Trust, Mumbai

Total budgetary plan outlay 2008-9  – 69.92crore

Total budgetary plan outlay 2009-10 – 324 crore

Universities/Education Institutes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Indian Institute of Management, Shilong

2. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Ranchi, Jharkhand

3. Rajiv Gandhi Technical University, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.

4. Rajiv Gandhi School of Intellectual Property Law, Kharagpur, Kolkata

5. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Secundrabad

6. Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law, Patiala, Punjab

7. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports

Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 1.50 crore

Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 3.00 crore

8. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Begumpet, Hyderabad, A.P

9. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam, Kerala

10. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering Research & Technology, Chandrapur, Maharashtra

11. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Airoli, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra

12. Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh

13. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Chola Nagar, Bangalore, Karnataka

14. Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.

15. Rajiv Gandhi D.e.d. College, Latur, Maharashtra

16. Rajiv Gandhi College, Shahpura, Bhopal

17. Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies, New Delhi

18. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Raebareli, U.P.

19. Rajiv Gandhi Homeopathic Medical College, Bhopal, M.P.

20. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Post Graduate Studies, East Godavari District, A.P.

21. Rajiv Gandhi College of Education, Thumkur, Karnataka

22. Rajiv Gandhi College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu

23. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of IT and Biotechnology, Bhartiya Vidhyapeeth

24. Rajiv Gandhi High School, Mumbai, Maharashtra

25. Rajiv Gandhi Group of Institutions, Satna, M.P.

26. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur, Tamil Nadu

27. Rajiv Gandhi Biotechnology Centre, R.T.M., Nagpur University

28. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

29. Rajiv Gandhi Mahavidyalaya, Madhya Pradesh

30. Rajiv Gandhi Post Graduate College, Allahabad, U.P.

31. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka

32. Rajiv Gandhi Govt. PG Ayurvedic College, Poprola, Himachal Pradesh

33. Rajiv Gandhi College, Satna, M.P.

34. Rajiv Gandhi Academy for Aviation Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

35. Rajiv Gandhi Madhyamic Vidyalaya, Maharashtra

36. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Contemporary Studies, Islamabad, Pakistan

37. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

38. Rajiv Gandhi Industrial Training Centre, Gandhinagar

39. Rajiv Gandhi University of Knowledge Technologies, Andhra Pradesh

40. Rajiv Gandhi Institute Of Distance Education, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu

41. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture , Tamil Nadu

42. Rajiv Gandhi University (Arunachal University), A.P.

43. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Medicine Centre (RGSMC), Kerela

44. Rajiv Gandhi Science Centre, Mauritus

45. Rajiv Gandhi Kala Mandir, Ponda, Goa

46. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyalaya, Mulund, Mumbai

47. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Polytechnic, Bangalore, Karnataka

48. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Circle Telecom Training Centre (India), Chennai

49. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Kasagod, Kerala

50. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College Of Aeronautics, Jaipur

51. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial First Grade College, Shimoga

52. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College of Education, Jammu & Kashmir

53. Rajiv Gandhi South Campus, Barkacha, Varanasi

54. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Teacher’s Training College, Jharkhand

55. Rajiv Gandhi Degree College, Rajahmundry, A.P.

56. Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), New Delhi

57. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development & Research, Mumbai, Maharashtra

58. Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy, Dehradun

59. Indira Gandhi RashtriyaUran Akademi, Fursatganj Airfield, Rae Bareli, Uttar Pradesh

60. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai

61. Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Orissa

62. Indira Gandhi B.Ed. College, Mangalore

63. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Education, Nanded, Maharashtra

64. Indira Gandhi Balika Niketan B.ED. College, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan

65. Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur, Madhya Pradesh

66. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Engineering, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra

67. Smt. Indira Gandhi Colelge, Tiruchirappalli

68. Indira Gandhi Engineering College, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh

69. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kashmere Gate, Delhi

70. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Sarang, Dist. Dhenkanal, Orissa

71. Indira Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Pune, Maharashtra

72. Indira Gandhi Integral Education Centre, New Delhi

73. Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, Delhi University, Delhi

74. Indira Gandhi High School, Himachal

75. Indira Kala Sangit Vishwavidyalaya, Chhattisgarh

76. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

77. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Andhra Pradesh

78. Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, Uttarakashi

79. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Business Management, Vikram University

80. Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

81. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore

82. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, AP

83. Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

84. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced Scientific Research, a deemed university, Jakkur, P.O. Bangalore

85. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Social Studies, affiliated to Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapith (Pune, Maharashtra)

86. Jawaharlal Nehru College of Aeronautics & Applied Sciences, Coimbatore, (ESTD 1968)

87. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Katraj, Dhankwdi, Pune, Maharashtra

88. Kamal Kishore Kadam’s Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

89. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Education & Technological Research, Nanded, Maharashra

90. Jawaharlal Nehru College, Aligarh

91. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad

92. Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Jabalpur

93. Jawaharlal Nehru B.Ed. College, Kota, Rajasthan

94. Jawaharlal Nehru P.G. College, Bhopal

95. Jawaharlal Nehru Government Engineering College, Sundernagar, District Mandi, H.P.

96. Jawaharlal Nehru PublicSchool, Kolar Road, Bhopal

97. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kakinada, A.P.

98. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Ibrahimpatti, Andhra Pradesh

Awards

1.   Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Achievement

2.   Rajiv Gandhi Shiromani Award

3.   Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Awards, Delhi Labour Welfare Board

4.   Rajiv Gandhi National Sadbhavana Award

5.   Rajiv Gandhi Manav Seva Award

6.   Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Conservation Award

7.   Rajiv Gandhi National Award Scheme for Original Book Writing on Gyan Vigyan

8.   Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award

9.   Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award, Instituted by Bureau of Indian Standards in 1991

10.   Rajiv Gandhi Environment Award for Clean Technology, Ministry of Environment & Forest, Govt. of India

11.   RajivGandhi Travelling Scholarship

12.   Rajiv Gandhi(UK) Foundation Scholarship

13.   Rajiv Gandhi Film Awards (Mumbai)

14.   Rajiv Gandhi Khelratna Puraskar

15.   Rajiv Gandhi Parisara Prashasti, Karnataka

16.   RajivGandhi Vocational Excellence Awards

17.   Rajiv Gandhi Excellence award

18.   Indira Gandhi Peace Prize

19.   Indira Gandhi Prize for National Integration

20.   Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Award

21.   Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Awards, Ministry of Environment   and Forests

22.    Indira Gandhi Memorial National Award forBest Environmental & Ecological

23.    Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Purashkar

24.    Indira Gandhi NSS Award

25.    Indira Gandhi Award for National Integration

26.    Indira Gandhi Official Language Award Scheme

27. Indira Gandhi Award for Best First Film

28. Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Awards for The Town Official Language

29. Indira Gandhi Prize” for Peace, Disarmament and Development

30. Indira Gandhi Prize for Popularization of Science

31. Implementation

32. Indira Gandhi Shiromani Award

33. Indira Gandhi NSS Award/National Youth

34. Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Pushar award – search n correct

35. Indira Gandhi N.S.S Awards

36. Indira Gandhi award for social service, MP Govt.

37.    Post Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship Scheme

38.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Award Scheme

39.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Shield Scheme

40.    Indira Gandhi Vision of Wildlife Conservation Zoo, a seminar organized by Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy.

41. Jawaharlal Nehru award for International peace worth Rs 15 lakh cash given to many international figures, every year, including Yasser Arafat of Palestine Liberation Front in 1988 and U Thant in 1965.

42. Soviet Land Nehru Award, a cash prize of Rs. 20,000 given to Shyam Benegal in Dec 89, in recognition of the above film.

43. Jawaharlal Nehru Balkalyan awards of Rs.10,000 each to 10 couples by Govt. of Maharashtra (ToI-28-4-89).

44. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi, for Academic Achievement

45. Jawaharlal Nehru birth centenary research award for energy

46. Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding

47. Nehru Bal Samiti Bravery Awards

48. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medal

49. Jawaharlal Nehru Prize” from 1998-99, to be given to organizations (preferably   NGOs) for Popularization of Science.

50. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Competition

51. Jawarharlal Nehru Student Award for research project of evolution of DNA

Scholarship / Fellowship

1. Rajiv Gandhi Scholarship Scheme for Students with Disabilities

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for SC/ST Candidates, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment

Budgetary Allocation for 2008-9 – 26.40 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 23.70 crores

3. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for ST Candidates

Budgetary Allocation for 2008-09 – 29.00 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 42.00 crores

4. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, IGNOU

5. Rajiv Gandhi Science Talent Research Fellows

6. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, Ministry of Tribal Affairs

Budgetary Allocation for  2008-9  – 16.00 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 22.50  crores

7. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for scheduled castes and scheduled tribes candidates given by University Grants Commission

8. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship sponsored by the Commonwealth of Learning in association with Indira Gandhi National Open University

9. Rajiv Gandhi science talent research fellowship given by Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced scientific research (to promote budding scientists) done in tandem with Department of Science and Technology and Rajiv Gandhi Foundation

10. Rajiv Gandhi HUDCO Fellowships in the Habitat Sector (to promote research in the field of sustainable Habitat development) for MPhil, {PhD Students for 2 to 3 years, conferred by HUDCO

11. Indira Gandhi Memorial Fellowships check

12. Fullbright scholarship now renamed Fullbright- Jawaharlal Nehru Scholarship

13. Cambridge Nehru Scholarships, 10 in number, for research at Cambridge University, London, leading to Ph. D. for 3 years, which include fee, maintenance allowance, air travel to UK and back.

14. Scheme of Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowships for Post-graduate Studies, Govt. of India.

15. Nehru Centenary (British) Fellowships/Awards

National Parks/ Sanctuaries/ Museums 

1. Rajiv Gandhi (Nagarhole) Wildlife Sanctury, Karnataka

2. Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Sanctury, Andhra Pradesh

3. Indira Gandhi National Park, Tamil Nadu

4. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , New Delhi

5. Indira Gandhi National Park, Anamalai Hills on Western Ghats

6. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park, Vishakhapatnam

7. Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (IGRMS)

8. Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary, Pollachi

9. Rajiv Gandhi Health Museum

10. The Rajiv Gandhi Museum of Natural History

11. Indira Gandhi Memorial museum, New Delhi

12. Jawaharlal Nehru museum in Aurangabad, Maharashtra opened by state govt.

13. Jawaharlal Nehru memorial Gallery, London

14. Jawaharlal Nehru planetarium, Worli, Mumbai.

15. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Exhibition for Children

Hospitals/Medical Institutions

1. Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science, Bangalore, Karnataka

2. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi

3. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry

4. Shri Rajiv Gandhi college of Dental Science & Hospital,  Bangalore, Karnataka

5. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Bio Technology, Thiruvanthapuram, Kerala

6. Rajiv Gandhi College of Nursing, Bangalore, Karnataka

7. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Raichur

8. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases, Bangalore, Karnataka

9. Rajiv Gandhi Paramedical College, Jodhpur

10. Rajiv Gandhi Medical College, Thane, Mumbai

11. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Karnataka

12. Rajiv Gandhi Hospital, Goa

13. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh

14. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Delhi

15. Rajiv Gandhi Homoeaopathic Medical College, Chinar Park, Bhopal, M.P

16. North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences , Shilong, Meghalaya

17. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

18. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore

19. Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sheikhpura, Patna

20. The Indira Gandhi Paediatric Hospital, Afghanistan

21. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health Hospital, Dharmaram College, Bangalore

22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Heath, Bangalore

23. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

24. Indira Gandhi Institute of Dental Science, Kerala

25. Indira Gandhi Memorial Ayurvedic Medical College & Hospital, Bhubaneshwar

26. Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur

27. Indira Gandhi Eye Hospital And Research Centre, Kolkata

28. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Shimla

29. Indira Gandhi Women and Children Hospital , Bhopla

30. Indira Gandhi Gas Relief hospital, Bhopal

31. Kamla Nehru Hospital, Shimla

32. Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya

33. Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry

Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 127.84 crores

Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 117.51 crores

34. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Bhopal

35. Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College in Raipur.

36. Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College & Hospital, New Delhi

37. Nehru, Science Centre, Worli, Mumbai

38. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, Bhopal

39. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Homoeopathic Medical Sciences, Maharashtra

Institutions / Chairs / Festivals

1. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development. (RGNIYD), Ministry of  Youth and Sports

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute, Faridabad, Haryana

3. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission in Tribal Areas

4. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development

5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Chhattisgarh

6. Rajiv Gandhi Chair Endowment established in 1998 to create a Chair of South Asian Economics

7. Rajiv Gandhi Project – A pilot to provide Education thru Massive Satellite Connectivity up grassroot Level

8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited (Government of Karnataka Enterprise)

9. Rajiv Gandhi Information and Technology Commission

10. Rajiv Gandhi Chair for Peace and Disarmament

11. Rajiv Gandhi Music Festival

12.   Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Lecture

13.    Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Diwas

14.    Rajiv Gandhi Education Foundation, Kerala

15.    Rajiv Gandhi Panchayati Raj Convention

16. The Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Educational and Charitable Society, Kasagod,Kerala

17. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial trophy ekankika spardha, Prerana Foundation, Kari Road

18. Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, Janpath, New Delhi

19. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj & Gramin Vikas Sansthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan

20. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam

21. Indira Gandhi  Institute for Development and Research , Mumbai

22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Cardiology (IGIC), Patna

23. Indira Gandhi National Center for the Arts, New Delhi

24. Indira Gandhi National Foundation, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

25. Indira Gandhi Mahila Sahakari Soot Girani Ltd, Maharashtra

26.    Indira Gandhi Conservation Monitoring Centre , Ministry of Environment & Forest

27.    Post-Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship for Single Girl Child

28.    Jawahar Shetkari Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd.

29. Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan

30.    Jawaharlal Nehru Centenary celebrations

31.    Postal stamps of different denominations and one Rupee coins in memory of Jawaharlal Nehru.

32.    Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Trust (U.K.) Scholarships

33. Jawaharlal Nehru Custom House Nhava Sheva, Maharashtra

34. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore

35. Jawaharlal Nehru Cultural Centre, Embassy of India, Moscow

36. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Udyog Kendra for Juveniles, Pune, Maharastra

37. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru college of agriculture and research institute , Pondicherry

Roads/Buildings/places

1. Rajiv Chowk, Delhi

2. Rajiv Gandhi Bhawan, Safdarjung, New Delhi

3. Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, New Delhi

4. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Kalkaji, Delhi

5. Indira Chowk, New Delhi

6. Nehru Planetarium, New Delhi

7. Nehru Yuvak Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi

8. Nehru Nagar, New Delhi

9. Nehru Place, New Delhi

10. Nehru Park, New Delhi Nehru House, BSZ Marg, New Delhi

11. Jawaharlal Nehru Government House New Delhi

12. Rajiv Gandhi Renewable Energy Park, Gurgaon, Haryana

13. Rajiv Gandhi Chowk, Andheri, Mumbai

14. Indira Gandhi Road, Mumbai

15. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Wadala, Mumbai

16. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Mulund, Mumbai

17. Nehru Nagar, Kurla, Mumbai

18. Jawaharlal Nehru gardens at Thane, Mumbai

19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Hall, Chennai

20. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Vadapalani, Chennai, Tamilnadu

21. Rajiv Gandhi Salai (Old Mahabalipuram road named after Rajiv Gandhi)

22. Rajiv Gandhi Education City, Haryana

23. Mount Rajiv, a peak in Himalaya

24. Rajiv Gandhi IT Habitat, Goa

25. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Chennai

26. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Vijayawada

27. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar in Coimbatore,  Tamil Nadu

28. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Trichy, Tamil Nadu

29. Rajiv Gandhi IT Park, Hinjewadi, Pune

30. Rajiv Gandhi Panchayat Bhav , Palanpur  Banaskantha

31. Rajiv Gandhi Chandigarh Technology Park, Chandigarh

32. Rajiv Gandhi Smriti Van, Jharkhand

33. Rajiv Gandhi statue, Panaji, Goa

34. Rajiv Gandhi Road, Chittoor

35. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial at Sriperumbudur

36. Indira Gandhi Memorial Library, University of Hyderabad

37. Indira Gandhi Musical Fountains, Bangalore

38. Indira Gandhi Planetarium , Lucknow

39. Indira Gandhi Centre for Indian Culture (IGCIC), High Commission of India, Mauritus

40. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , Eastern Ghats of India

41. Indira Gandhi Canal, Ramnagar, Jaisalmer

42. Indira Gandhi Industrial Complex, Ranipet, Vellore District

43. Indira Gandhi Park, Itanagar

44. Indira Gandhi Squiare , Pondicherry

45. Indira Gandhi Road, Willingdon Island, Cochin

46. Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden, Kashmir

47. Indira Gandhi Sagar Dam, Nagpur

48. Indira Gandhi bridge, Rameshvar, Tamil Nadu

49. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Bhiwandi Nizampur Municipal Corporation

50. Indira Gandhi memorial cultural Complex, UP Govt.

51. Indira Gandhi Sports Stadium , Rohru District, Shimla

52. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj Sansthan , Bhopal

53. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Rajasthan

54. Indira Nagar, Lucknow

55. Roads are named after Jawaharlal Nehru in many cities e.g. in Jaipur, Nagpur, Vile Parle, Ghatkopar, Mulund etc.

56. Nehru Nagar, Ghaziabad

57. Jawaharlal Nehru Gardens, Ambarnath

58. Jawarharlal Nehru Gardens, Panhala

59. Jawaharlal Nehru market, Jammu.

60. Jawaharlal Nehru Tunnel on the Jammu Srinagar Highway

61. Nehru Chowk, Ulhas Nagar, Maharashtra.

62. Nehru Bridge on the river Mandvi, Panaji, Goa

63. Nehru Nagar Ghaziabad

64. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Dharmatala, Kolkata

65. Nehru Road, Guwahati

66. Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur

67. Nehru Vihar Colony, Kalyanpur, Lucknow

68. Nehru Nagar, Patna

69. Jawaharlal Nehru Street, Pondicherry

70. Nehru Bazaar, Madanapalli, Tirupathi

71. Nehru Chowk, Bilaspur. M.P

72. Nehru Street, Ponmalaipatti, Tiruchirapalli

73. Nehru Nagar, S.M. Road, Ahmedabad

74. Nehru Nagar,. Nashik Pune Road

The entire details of the schemes are available in Suryaprakash’s blog.

Related article : From Cradle to grave, be grateful to Nehru-Gandhis!

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