The Candid Eye

January 13, 2010

India must be fully prepared to defend its borders

Filed under: Arunachal Pradesh,China,India — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
Tags: , , ,

India must be fully prepared to defend its borders in the Northeastern region while striving for improved bilateral ties with China in trade and other fields, Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister Dorjee Khandu said on Tuesday.

Dorjee Khandu, the CM of Arunachal Pradesh :http://www.itimesindia.in/

“Border issues are dealt with by the Central government. As chief minister of Arunachal Pradesh, I would like the Central government to be in all preparedness on the borders, while striving for improving bilateral trade and relations to the benefit of both,” Khandu told PTI in an interview in Itanagar.

“We should always rely on our strength and take all steps to defend our borders without depending on anybody, no matter how good the relations in other fronts are,” he said in reply to a question.

Arunachal Pradesh : Image Couresty - http://www.icarzcu3.gov.in/

“I can only say that another war between the two Asian giants will affect the economies of both. Instead, both should cooperate to sustain their fast growing economies,” he added.

Khandu was asked if he felt that India and China leading a joint block with Brazil and South Africa against the developed countries at the recent Copenhagen meet on climate change has brought both the two a step closer to an early solution to the border dispute, especially in Arunachal Pradesh.

China claims Arunachal as its territory which India has rejected. Khandu said land for eight Advanced Landing Grounds lying unused for long has been handed over to the Union defence ministry for free under a Memorandum of Understanding signed last year with the stipulation that they will be used both by military and civil aircraft.

The state government has also sent a proposal for construction of another ALG in the Buddhist town of Tawang, which attracts 9000 tourists every year, besides being an important border town from the strategic point of view.

The process for allotment of land for accommodation of the proposed deployment of two more divisions of army were also on.Khandu, who returned to power with two-thirds majority in the October assembly elections, said he intends to retire from politics after his present term expires.

He plans to complete some major projects that will help the backward state become prosperous by exploiting its huge natural resources.On the cards are the ambitious 1800 km Trans-Arunachal highway and other highways interlinking district headquarters and a four-lane link between the state capital with the rest of the country.

Source: Rediff

Advertisements

December 24, 2009

Can Indian leadership handle China??

This is an excerpt from the article by Tarun Vijay.

The famous hotel Dusit Thani Hua Hin overlooking the gulf of Thailand, where the leaders of India and China met, proudly proclaims, “We use gifts of the heavens to create heaven on earth.” It is one of Thailand’s most scintillating hubs, known for its calm and serene surroundings. I don’t know if the leaders noticed it, but they surely were there to create a better atmosphere between the two nuclear-powered nations which fought a bitter war forty-seven years ago and have been under the shadow of a cold war once again.

Manmohan Singh & Wen Jiabao

Manmohan Singh & Wen Jiabao

The meeting between Prime Ministers Manmohan Singh and Wen Jiabao must help calm the harshness in both the capitals. Prudence and pragmatism prevailed and the outcome was placidly correct. Just correct. Neither yielded the position he has stuck to and neither raised the decibel levels. You couldn’t have expected a tit-for-tat show there and while being conscious of the present situation, if both sides can reconcile themselves to building bridges while sorting out difference, neither loses.

Of late, the Chinese have been pricking Indian sensitivities at an extraordinarily fast pace. So much so that even the electioneering scenes in India were overpowered by the news regarding Chinese incursions, Indian rebuffs, major cover stories in media and the Arunachal CM meeting the Prime Minister.

Interestingly, in such a charged background our cool and gentle Manmohan Singh met Wen Jiabao and felt “excited” as the news reports say. I am sure this must be a reporter’s overenthusiasm, as he might have wanted to convey the thrill of the meeting. The reports said, “Manmohan Singh told Wen: ‘I am excited to see you.’ He said the Chinese people have had a number of achievements “and we share their sense of accomplishment”. He said this in the context of the 60th anniversary of the founding of modern China.”

The Chinese premier was more candid. He said, “We want to have a healthy and steady relationship with India. I hope we can use this opportunity to exchange our views on all related issues.”

As any student of Chinese affairs can tell, understanding diplomacy in Mandarin is a tricky job. Each word and the length of the sentence and similes used to convey the message have to be studied carefully. The official “leaks” do not tell us whether the Indian side conveyed any displeasure or annoyance to the Chinese premier on their cold-war like interventions and the Chinese side, it appears, was calmly “just diplomatically right”. It means they think what they have been doing so far is right and demands no explanation or relook.This must worry us.

The raking up of the border issue so forcefully, in spite of an agreement that the issue will be resolved amicably and through dialogue, has surprised many. While the pro-China lobby in Delhi blamed the American influence for creating an atmosphere that would make the Indian people ask for a reprisal, the factual position about Chinese arrogance spoke a different story. The situation on the Chinese side has to be understood before any final “assault”. The Chinese have grown rich, assertive and xenophobic in their global dreams. And this must make them more interventionist in near future.

It began with the Chinese incursions – observers say there had been more than 218 incursions by the Chinese security personnel since January this year. And the number of such incursions was higher in the Ladakh sector, where they have been successful to also make India dismantle a bridge on the Indus. The experts from Ladakh have been complaining that the Chinese have been intruding the Indian territory, they are not taking our land by inches but by yards. These experts also tells us the points and the nullahs where the Chinese came and then established their dominance. Yet nobody from the South Block took it seriously. Even the Army chief, Gen Deepak Kapoor, and our foreign minister, S M Krishna, gave contradictory statements about incursions. Still the Chinese belligerence didn’t stop. China objected to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s Arunachal visit, it began construction work in the Kashmir region which is under illegal occupation of Pakistan, in spite of having conceded by the Indian government that Tibet is a part of China (which the nationalist school of thought will never accept), China keeps showing Kashmir as an independent country and Sikkim has yet to be shown as an Indian state. It also began giving visas to Kashmiris separately and hasn’t quite understood about the terrorist problem India is facing though it would like us to understand its jihadi headache in Xinjiang.

China opposed India’s agreement with the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), it tried to block Asian Development Bank’s $60 million loan for a power generation project in Arunachal, and more recently it tried its hardest to coerce Southeast Asian nations against inviting India as a member of the East Asia summit. It has not only accepted a “gift” of land from Pakistan, which in fact is claimed by India, but has been strengthening Pakistan militarily by providing nuclear knowhow, among other things. On the maritime front, China is steadfastly modernizing its bases in the Indian Ocean with its port development projects going in full swing in Pakistan, Myanmar and Sri Lanka.

India expressed its concern over China’s new underground nuclear submarine base off the southern tropical island of Hainan. The then Naval chief, Sureesh Mehta, had publicly stated that the base poses a threat to Indian security. On the Arunachal border China has been shifting border pillars and making a dam on the Brahmaputra that would be a potential threat to the Indian people. On the Sikkim border a new highway and permanent army structures have come up. In times of any hostility, the Chinese would be able to cut the Siliguri corridor swiftly. On the other side, a joint command of Lanzhou Military Region opposite Ladakh, Himachal and Uttarakhand has come up. Tibet has become the most powerful Chinese base against India and reports say that China is in a position to send 20,000 troops anywhere on the Indian border from its Tibetan bases within two hours.

By contrast, Indian politicians have no idea what should be their Chinese policy and are busy in petty domestic rumblings or totally uninformed cacophonies. Once Arunachal used to have 12c functional air strips, now it has only two and more accurately just one, to cite an example of our preparedness. It’s only after the media taking up the Chinese threat that India responded by positioning its Sukhoi war planes replacing MIGs on the northeastern front and deciding to revive its four IAF bases on the Arunachal border (Vijaya Nagar, Mechuka, Tuting and Passighat), yet the confidence level hasn’t risen high on our side.

But it would be wrong to conclude that China would engage India in any military assault soon. It would also be imprudent and pathetically unintelligent to put China in the Pakistan category. It has to be a different story – we are not “1962” and China is not Maoist either. Keeping a watch on the factual positions, building our own defence and economy, we must continue to engae China in bilateral relations.

Read the full article here.

October 30, 2009

PM says – China not building dam!

Filed under: Arunachal Pradesh,China,India — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
Tags: , , , ,

The present congress government once again ignored and played down the serious threat that China poses to India.Manmohan Singh or anyone for that matter, cannot counter the Chinese directly unless we shed our complacency and red tapism atleast in security and defence related issues.

According to Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister Dorjee Khandu, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has said that China has not constructed any dam on Brahmaputra river that would have been a matter of concern for India.

Manmohan Singh with Dorjee Khandu

Manmohan Singh with Dorjee Khandu, the CM of Arunachal Pradesh

Khandu, who led a delegation of state leaders to Singh, said on Monday that the Prime Minister had also told them that India would tackle the boundary issue with China diplomatically. The delegation met Singh to seek a review of the defence strategy for the eastern sector in view of Chinese incursions and expressed serious concern over reports of a dam being constructed by China on Brahmaputra river.

“The Prime Minister said no dam is being constructed and only run-of-the-river construction has been made,” Khandu told reporters while citing a letter from the Chinese government. A media report last week had said that China was building a big dam on Brahmaputra river, prompting India to express concern over the development as it would change the course of the river and could result in submergence of low-lying areas downstream. India has no problem with run-off-the-river constructions but building of a dam as it involves storage of water.

When the delegation raised the issue of Chinese incursions into the state, the Prime Minister reportedly assured them that the Centre will “tackle” the boundary question with the neighbouring country bilaterally.

“The Prime Minister told us not to worry. He said the Centre will tackle with the situation bilaterally,” said Congress MP from Arunachal West Takam Sanjoy, who was part of the delegation. Sanjoy said the delegation requested the Prime Minister to give a big push to infrastructure development to ensure better surveillance over Chinese activities and urged him to create a para-military force exclusively comprising youths from the state.

Source: Indian Express

Related Articles:

China begins building of dam on its side of Brahmaputra

India asks China to stay out of PoK

October 14, 2009

After Pakistan,its China’s turn now!

Filed under: China — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
Tags: , , , , , , ,

The prime minister of  the country is condemned for visiting a place in his country.Nothing worse can India expect from China.China has been aggressively pursuing its own agenda ever since it waged a war against India in 1962.India has been a whipping boy for China since then and, Congress government wants to continue the same thing though our security and interests are greatly compromised.

Beijing said on Tuesday it was “seriously dissatisfied” by the visit of an Indian leader to a disputed Himalayan region, the latest tense exchange between the Asian giants over border areas claimed by both. (Courtesy: Economic Times)

China’s foreign ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu accused an unnamed Indian leader of ignoring China’s concerns by visiting the state of Arunachal Pradesh.

Ma Zhaoxu

Ma Zhaoxu

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh travelled to the mountainous state, twice the size of Switzerland, earlier this month to woo voters ahead of Monday’s state assembly election.

Beijing lays claim to 90,000 sq kilometres of land in the border state, that it sees as “southern” Tibet and had already expressed its anger about a planned visit by the Dalai Lama in November. “We demand the Indian side pay attention to the serious and just concerns of the Chinese side, and do not provoke incidents in the disputed region, in order to facilitate the healthy development of Sino-Indian relations,” Ma said in a statement posted on the Foreign Ministry website.

India and China fought a brief but bloody border war, partly over Arunachal Pradesh, in 1962, and while trade between the two has since flourished, the border disputes have never been resolved.

Mistrust remains close below the surface and appears to have resurfaced in recent months. There has been a flurry of reports in Indian media of Chinese incursions along the border — shrugged off by both governments — and Delhi this month protested against a Chinese embassy policy of issuing different visas to residents of disputed Kashmir. China also protested against the Dalai Lama’s trip to Arunachal Pradesh.

It reviles the Tibetan spiritual leader as a separatist and said the trip was further proof of his scheming.

Related Articles on this issue:

China claims Arunachal Pradesh as Chinese territory

Google shows parts of Arunachal Pradesh in Chinese language

August 14, 2009

Chinese incursions in India

Source: TOI

Chinese incursions into Indian territory rose sharply in 2008
Indrani Bagchi

Chinese incursions into Indian territory peaked in 2008, with 270 “violations” being recorded in the western, middle and eastern
sectors. In 2009, they appear to have let up a little on the aggression front, with a little over 60 violations occurring thus far. Chinese violations made headlines last year, signalling a belligerence that made India jittery.

View Map on Google

With the first batch of advanced Sukhoi-30MKI fighter jets getting ready to be deployed in Tezpur and Chabua, Assam, India is slowly responding to the uncertainties of Chinese intentions, by enhancing its state of preparedness in the area. According to the former air force chief, Air Chief Marshal Fali Homi Major, India will deploy a full squadron of these fighter jets in the eastern sector.

Recent figures point to a sharp spike in border violations and aggressive patrolling by Chinese all along the undemarcated border with India since 2007. Aggressive patrolling by Chinese forces, particularly in the western sector, have resulted in 2,285 instances in 2008, as compared to 778 instances in 2007. Indian authorities have recorded 413 instances in 2009 so far.

The brunt of aggressive patrolling by the Chinese has been felt in Demchok, Koyul and Chushul areas in Ladakh. The western sector, i.e. Ladakh, has borne the maximum number of violations, though it’s been the Chinese activity in Arunachal Pradesh and Sikkim areas that have attracted greater attention. India has, in response, set up forward landing bases in Daulat Beg Oldi and Chushul in Ladakh.

Earlier this year, questioned on the repeated incursions, foreign secretary Shiv Shankar Menon had told journalists at a function in New Delhi that he did not think these were intended to change the status quo between India and China. “I do not see the kind of changes in the pattern that would suggest that either side is determined to change the status quo or something fundamental has changed for the worse.”

But it is China’s apparently declared interest in southern Tibet and Tawang in the eastern sector that is of greater concern to India, particularly since they continue to press their claim over all of Arunachl Pradesh. In 2008, just the area in Kongra La Pass (what’s popularly known as Finger Point) in north Sikkim recorded six violations.

In Arunachal Pradesh, the Asaphila area and Dichu/Madan Bridge were worst hit, recording violations even this year. But officials describe the area as by and large “stable”. Questioned about repeated incursions by China, officials say it’s a “regular” occurrence and generally downplay it. But security officials say Chinese troops became adventurous even during the recent election season in India, indulging in “aggressive patrolling” in sections of Arunachal Pradesh.

It is in response to these that India has now taken significant steps to beef up security here. Governor of Arunachal Pradesh, General JJ Singh, said on Saturday that two more army divisions will be deployed along the Sino-Indian border in Arunachal Pradesh within a few years.

“It is true that within a few years, two army divisions comprising 25,000 to 30,000 personnel each will be deployed along the Arunachal border as part of planned augmentation of our capabilities to defend the country,” the former army chief was quoted as saying.

“Increase of force strength is to meet future national security challenges,” he added. “Enhancement of quality of weapons, fighting platforms, intelligence gathering along with increased deployment of personnel and Sukhoi combat jets in nearby Tezpur base in Assam besides construction of border roads and other infrastructure are part of the plan to develop capabilities in a phased manner within the next few years to effectively meet challenges in the eastern theatre,” the governor said.

July 27, 2009

Government Schemes and Projects named after Nehru-Gandhi family

Filed under: Congress,Indira Gandhi,Rahul Gandhi — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My friend arrived at Indira Gandhi International Airport,New Delhi last week, after finishing his research in Cambridge University under Cambridge Nehru scholarship. Recently he had come to Rajiv Gandhi university in Bangalore.He wanted to meet me in Indira Gandhi musical Fountains festival.I inquired about his new job in Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi….This is the kind of penetration,Nehru-Gandhi family has done to our lives.

Nehru-Gandhi family

Nehru-Gandhi family

Since 1947,the Nehru family has been using people’s money to market and promote their party and themselves.Though we got independence from Britishers to think and act freely,this one family has been doing all it can to influence the gullible people and their thinking and decisions.What is so interesting is,they do this in a systematic manner without much publicity.These clandestine acts of this family is getting them people’s support and sympathy without any real effort from their side.I came across these interesting details of A.Suryaprakash about the government projects and Nehru-Gandhi family’s association with those.These thousands of schemes have miserably failed to eradicate poverty among people.They have neither provided safe drinking water for all Indians nor guarded people from external/internal terrorist/maoist threats.

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – 91.88 crore.
Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – 91.52 crore
4. Rajiv Gandhi Udyami Mitra Yojana for benefit of NE entrepreneurs, Ministry of Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, Government of India,
Budgetary allocation 2008-9 – Rs. 2.70 crore
Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – Rs.1.12 crore
5. Indira Awas Yojana, Ministry of Rural Areas and Environment – IAY is a CSS funded on cost-sharing basis between the Centre and the States in the ratio of 75:25. In the case of UTs, the entire funds are provided by Centre. The target groups for housing under IAY are households below poverty line living in rural areas, particularly those belonging to SC/ST and freed bonded labourers.
Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – Rs. 7919.00 crores
Budgetary allocation  2009-10 – Rs.7914.70 crores
6. Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme – objective to provide social security to workers in the unorganized sector in a phased manner. Budgetary allocation in 2008-09 is Rs. 3,443 crore
7. Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission, Ministry of Urban Development,
Govt. of India – 7 years time frame, 50,000 cr.
Budgetary allocation for 2008 – 9 – 10447.98 crore
Budgetary allocation for 2009-10 – 10713.84 crore
8. Jawaharlal Nehru Rojgar Yojna – Ministry of Labour and Employment – A Self- employment programme for urban poor
9. Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Kalyan Yojna, Employees’ State Insurance Corporation
10. Indira Gandhi Canal Project, Funded by World Bank
11. Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojana, Union Ministry of Textiles, in
association with ICICI Lombard General Insurance Company Limited
12. Indira Vikas Patra
State Government Schemes
1. Rajiv Gandhi Rehabilitation Package for Tsunami Affected Areas, Govt. of Tamil Nadu, Budgetary Allocation Rs.2347.19 crores
2. Rajiv Gandhi Social Security Scheme for poor people, Department of Revenue and Disaster Management, Govt. of Puducherry
3. Rajiv Ratna Awas Yojna – Congress party president and United Progressive Alliance (UPA) Chairperson Sonia Gandhi had announced that the Centre would give a package of Rs.1,500-crore for providing housing facilities to the poorer sections in Delhi, thus announcing the scheme.
4. Rajiv Gandhi Prathamik Shiksha Mission , Raigarh
5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Madhya Pradesh
6. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Food Security , Madhya Pradesh
7. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh
8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited is a Government Company established by the Government of Karnataka to cater to the housing needs of the Economically and Socially weaker sections of the society.  Registered in April 2000, its authorised Capital is Rs.10 crores with Rs.3 crore  paid up.
9. Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Development Mission, Rajasthan
10. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Literacy Programme, Assam
11. Rajiv Gandhi Swavlamban Rojgar Yojana, Govt. of NCT of Delhi
12. Rajiv Gandhi Mobile Aids Counseling and Testing Services, Rajiv Gandhi Foundation
13. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyarthi Suraksha Yojana, Maharashtra
14. Rajiv Gandhi Mission for Water Shed Management, M.P.
15. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission for Tribal Areas, MP
16. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry
17. Rajiv Gandhi Breakfast Scheme, Pondicherry
18. Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Divas, Punjab
19. Rajiv Gandhi Artisans Health and Life Insurance Scheme, Tamil Nadu
20. Rajiv Gandhi Zopadpatti and Nivara Prakalpa, Mumbai
21. Rajiv Arogya Sri programme , Gujrat State Govt. Scheme
22. Rajiv Gandhi Abhyudaya Yojana, AP
23. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Saksharta Mission, Jabalpur
24. Rajiv Gandhi Bridges and Roads Infrastructure Development Programme for the construction of new roads and bridges and strengthening of the existing ones in the state of Haryana
25. Rajiv Gandhi Gramin Niwara Prakalp, Maharashtra Govt.
26. Indira Gandhi Utkrishtha Chhattervritti Yojna for Post Plus Two Students, Himachal Pradesh Government Scheme, Sponsored by, Central Government
27. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme, Maharashtra Govt.
28. Indira Gandhi Prathisthan, Housing and Urban Planning Department, UP Govt
29. Indira Kranthi Patham Scheme, Andhra Pradesh
30. Indira Gandhi Nahar Pariyojana, State Govt. Scheme
31. Indira Gandhi Vruddha Bhumiheen Shetmajoor Anudan Yojana, Govt. of
Maharashtra
32. Indira Gandhi Nahar Project  (IGNP), Jaisalmer, Govt. of Rajasthan
33. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Yojna, Govt. of Maharashtra
34. Indira Gandhi kuppam, State Govt. Welfare Scheme for Tsunami effected
fishermen
35. Indira Gandhi Drinking Water Scheme-2006, Haryana Govt.
36. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Old, Landless, Destitute women farm labour Scheme,
Maharashtra Govt.
37. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme , Maharashtra Govt.
38. Indira Gaon Ganga Yojana, Chattisgarh
39. Indira Sahara Yojana , Chattisgarh
40. Indira Soochna Shakti Yojana, Chattisgarh
41. Indira Gandhi Balika Suraksha Yojana , HP
42. Indira Gandhi Garibi Hatao Yojana (DPIP), MP
43. Indira Gandhi super thermal power project , Haryana Govt.
44. Indira Gandhi Water Project, Haryana Govt.
45. Indira Gandhi Sagar Project , Bhandara District Gosikhurd Maharashtra
46. Indira Jeevitha Bima Pathakam, AP Govt
47. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshani Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.
48. Indira Mahila Yojana Scheme, Meghalaya Govt
49. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, Chhattisgarh Govt.
50. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.
51. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, The government of Andhra Pradesh helped most of the respondent families in acquiring female calves through this scheme.
52. Indira Gandhi Landless Agriculture Labour scheme, Maharashtra Govt.
Sports/Tournaments/Trophies
1. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup Kabaddi Tournament
2. Rajiv Gandhi Sadbhavana Run
3. Rajiv Gandhi Federation Cup boxing championship
4. Rajiv Gandhi International tournament (football)
5. NSCI – Rajiv Gandhi road races, New Delhi
6. Rajiv Gandhi Boat Race, Kerala
7. Rajiv Gandhi International Artistic Gymnastic Tournament
8. Rajiv Gandhi Kabbadi Meet
9. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Roller Skating Championship
10. Rajiv Gandhi memorial marathon race, New Delhi
11. Rajiv Gandhi International Judo Championship, Chandigarh
12. Rajeev Gandhi Memorial Trophy for the Best College, Calicut
13. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Cricket Tournament, Initiated by Rahul Gandhi in Amethi
14. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup (U-21), football
15. Rajiv Gandhi Trophy (football)
16.    Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Sportspersons
17.   All Indira Rajiv Gandhi Basketball (Girls) Tournament, organized by Delhi
State
18. All India Rajiv Gandhi Wrestling Gold Cup, organized by Delhi State
19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Jhopadpatti Football Tournament, Rajura
20. Rajiv Gandhi International Invitation Gold Cup Football Tournament, Jamshedpur
21. Rajiv Gandhi Mini Olympics, Mumbai
22. Rajiv Gandhi Beachball Kabaddi Federation
23. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Trophy Prerana Foundation
24. International Indira Gandhi Gold Cup Tournament
25. Indira Gandhi International Hockey Tournament
26. Indira Gandhi Boat Race
27. Jawaharlal Nehru International Gold Cup Football Tournament.
28. Jawaharlal Nehru Hockey Tournament.
Stadia
1. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Delhi
2. Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium, New Delhi
3. Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, New Delhi
4. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Stadium, Bawana
5. Rajiv Gandhi National Football Academy, Haryana
6. Rajiv Gandhi AC Stadium, Vishakhapatnam
7. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Pondicherry
8. Rajiv Gandhi Stadium, Nahariagun, Itanagar
9. Rajiv Gandhi Badminton Indoor Stadium, Cochin
10. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Kadavanthra,Ernakulam
11. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Complex , Singhu
12. Rajib Gandhi Memorial Sports Complex, Guwahati
13. Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad
14. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Cochin
15. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh
16. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Una, Himachal Pradesh
17. Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Vishakhapatnam
18. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Deogarh, Rajasthan
19. Gandhi Stadium, Bolangir, Orissa
Airports/ Ports
1. Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, New Hyderabad, A.P.
2. Rajiv Gandhi Container Terminal, Cochin
3. Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi
4. Indira Gandhi Dock, Mumbai
5. Jawaharlal Nehru Nava Sheva Port Trust, Mumbai
Total budgetary plan outlay 2008-9  – 69.92crore
Total budgetary plan outlay 2009-10 – 324 crore
Universities/Education Institutes
1. Rajiv Gandhi Indian Institute of Management, Shilong
2. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Ranchi, Jharkhand
3. Rajiv Gandhi Technical University, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.
4. Rajiv Gandhi School of Intellectual Property Law, Kharagpur, Kolkata
5. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Secundrabad
6. Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law, Patiala, Punjab
7. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 1.50 crore
Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 3.00 crore
8. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Begumpet, Hyderabad, A.P
9. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam, Kerala
10. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering Research & Technology, Chandrapur, Maharashtra
11. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Airoli, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra
12. Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh
13. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Chola Nagar, Bangalore, Karnataka
14. Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.
15. Rajiv Gandhi D.e.d. College, Latur, Maharashtra
16. Rajiv Gandhi College, Shahpura, Bhopal
17. Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies, New Delhi
18. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Raebareli, U.P.
19. Rajiv Gandhi Homeopathic Medical College, Bhopal, M.P.
20. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Post Graduate Studies, East Godavari District, A.P.
21. Rajiv Gandhi College of Education, Thumkur, Karnataka
22. Rajiv Gandhi College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu
23. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of IT and Biotechnology, Bhartiya Vidhyapeeth
24. Rajiv Gandhi High School, Mumbai, Maharashtra
25. Rajiv Gandhi Group of Institutions, Satna, M.P.
26. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur, Tamil Nadu
27. Rajiv Gandhi Biotechnology Centre, R.T.M., Nagpur University
28. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
29. Rajiv Gandhi Mahavidyalaya, Madhya Pradesh
30. Rajiv Gandhi Post Graduate College, Allahabad, U.P.
31. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka
32. Rajiv Gandhi Govt. PG Ayurvedic College, Poprola, Himachal Pradesh
33. Rajiv Gandhi College, Satna, M.P.
34. Rajiv Gandhi Academy for Aviation Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
35. Rajiv Gandhi Madhyamic Vidyalaya, Maharashtra
36. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Contemporary Studies, Islamabad, Pakistan
37. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship
38. Rajiv Gandhi Industrial Training Centre, Gandhinagar
39. Rajiv Gandhi University of Knowledge Technologies, Andhra Pradesh
40. Rajiv Gandhi Institute Of Distance Education, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
41. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture , Tamil Nadu
42. Rajiv Gandhi University (Arunachal University), A.P.
43. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Medicine Centre (RGSMC), Kerela
44. Rajiv Gandhi Science Centre, Mauritus
45. Rajiv Gandhi Kala Mandir, Ponda, Goa
46. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyalaya, Mulund, Mumbai
47. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Polytechnic, Bangalore, Karnataka
48. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Circle Telecom Training Centre (India), Chennai
49. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Kasagod, Kerala
50. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College Of Aeronautics, Jaipur
51. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial First Grade College, Shimoga
52. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College of Education, Jammu & Kashmir
53. Rajiv Gandhi South Campus, Barkacha, Varanasi
54. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Teacher’s Training College, Jharkhand
55. Rajiv Gandhi Degree College, Rajahmundry, A.P.
56. Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), New Delhi
57. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development & Research, Mumbai, Maharashtra
58. Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy, Dehradun
59. Indira Gandhi RashtriyaUran Akademi, Fursatganj Airfield, Rae Bareli, Uttar Pradesh
60. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai
61. Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Orissa
62. Indira Gandhi B.Ed. College, Mangalore
63. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Education, Nanded, Maharashtra
64. Indira Gandhi Balika Niketan B.ED. College, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan
65. Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur, Madhya Pradesh
66. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Engineering, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra
67. Smt. Indira Gandhi Colelge, Tiruchirappalli
68. Indira Gandhi Engineering College, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh
69. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kashmere Gate, Delhi
70. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Sarang, Dist. Dhenkanal, Orissa
71. Indira Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Pune, Maharashtra
72. Indira Gandhi Integral Education Centre, New Delhi
73. Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, Delhi University, Delhi
74. Indira Gandhi High School, Himachal
75. Indira Kala Sangit Vishwavidyalaya, Chhattisgarh
76. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
77. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Andhra Pradesh
78. Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, Uttarakashi
79. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Business Management, Vikram University
80. Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
81. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore
82. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, AP
83. Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra
84. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced Scientific Research, a deemed university, Jakkur, P.O. Bangalore
85. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Social Studies, affiliated to Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapith (Pune, Maharashtra)
86. Jawaharlal Nehru College of Aeronautics & Applied Sciences, Coimbatore, (ESTD 1968)
87. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Katraj, Dhankwdi, Pune, Maharashtra
88. Kamal Kishore Kadam’s Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra
89. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Education & Technological Research, Nanded, Maharashra
90. Jawaharlal Nehru College, Aligarh
91. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad
92. Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Jabalpur
93. Jawaharlal Nehru B.Ed. College, Kota, Rajasthan
94. Jawaharlal Nehru P.G. College, Bhopal
95. Jawaharlal Nehru Government Engineering College, Sundernagar, District Mandi, H.P.
96. Jawaharlal Nehru PublicSchool, Kolar Road, Bhopal
97. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kakinada, A.P.
98. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Ibrahimpatti, Andhra Pradesh
Awards
1.   Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Achievement
2.   Rajiv Gandhi Shiromani Award
3.   Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Awards, Delhi Labour Welfare Board
4.   Rajiv Gandhi National Sadbhavana Award
5.   Rajiv Gandhi Manav Seva Award
6.   Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Conservation Award
7.   Rajiv Gandhi National Award Scheme for Original Book Writing
on Gyan Vigyan
8.   Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award
9.   Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award, Instituted by Bureau of
Indian Standards in 1991
10.   Rajiv Gandhi Environment Award for Clean Technology, Ministry
of Environment & Forest, Govt. of India
11.   RajivGandhi Travelling Scholarship
12.   Rajiv Gandhi(UK) Foundation Scholarship
13.   Rajiv Gandhi Film Awards (Mumbai)
14.   Rajiv Gandhi Khelratna Puraskar
15.   Rajiv Gandhi Parisara Prashasti, Karnataka
16.   RajivGandhi Vocational Excellence Awards
17.   Rajiv Gandhi Excellence award
18.   Indira Gandhi Peace Prize
19.   Indira Gandhi Prize for National Integration
20.   Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Award
21.   Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Awards, Ministry of
Environment   and Forests
22.    Indira Gandhi Memorial National Award forBest Environmental
& Ecological
23.    Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Purashkar
24.    Indira Gandhi NSS Award
25.    Indira Gandhi Award for National Integration
26.    Indira Gandhi Official Language Award Scheme
27. Indira Gandhi Award for Best First Film
28. Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Awards for The Town Official Language
29. Indira Gandhi Prize” for Peace, Disarmament and Development
30. Indira Gandhi Prize for Popularization of Science
31. Implementation
32. Indira Gandhi Shiromani Award
33. Indira Gandhi NSS Award/National Youth
34. Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Pushar award – search n correct
35. Indira Gandhi N.S.S Awards
36. Indira Gandhi award for social service, MP Govt.
37.    Post Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship Scheme
38.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Award Scheme
39.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Shield Scheme
40.    Indira Gandhi Vision of Wildlife Conservation Zoo, a seminar organized by
Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy.
41. Jawaharlal Nehru award for International peace worth Rs 15 lakh cash given to many international figures, every year, including Yasser Arafat of Palestine Liberation Front in 1988 and U Thant in 1965.
42. Soviet Land Nehru Award, a cash prize of Rs. 20,000 given to Shyam Benegal in Dec 89, in recognition of the above film.
43. Jawaharlal Nehru Balkalyan awards of Rs.10,000 each to 10 couples by Govt. of Maharashtra (ToI-28-4-89).
44. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi, for Academic Achievement
45. Jawaharlal Nehru birth centenary research award for energy
46. Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding
47. Nehru Bal Samiti Bravery Awards
48. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medal
49. Jawaharlal Nehru Prize” from 1998-99, to be given to organizations (preferably   NGOs) for Popularization of Science.
50. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Competition
51. Jawarharlal Nehru Student Award for research project of evolution of DNA
Scholarship / Fellowship
1. Rajiv Gandhi Scholarship Scheme for Students with Disabilities
2. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for SC/ST Candidates, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
Budgetary Allocation for 2008-9 – 26.40 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 23.70 crores
3. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for ST Candidates
Budgetary Allocation for 2008-09 – 29.00 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 42.00 crores
4. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, IGNOU
5. Rajiv Gandhi Science Talent Research Fellows
6. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, Ministry of Tribal Affairs
Budgetary Allocation for  2008-9  – 16.00 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 22.50  crores
7. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for scheduled castes and scheduled          tribes candidates given by University Grants Commission
8. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship sponsored by the Commonwealth of Learning in           association with Indira Gandhi National Open University
9. Rajiv Gandhi science talent research fellowship given by Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced scientific research (to promote budding scientists) done in tandem with Department of Science and Technology and Rajiv Gandhi Foundation
10. Rajiv Gandhi HUDCO Fellowships in the Habitat Sector (to promote research in the field of sustainable Habitat development) for MPhil, {PhD Students for 2 to 3 years, conferred by HUDCO
11. Indira Gandhi Memorial Fellowships check
12. Fullbright scholarship now renamed Fullbright- Jawaharlal Nehru Scholarship
13. Cambridge Nehru Scholarships, 10 in number, for research at Cambridge University, London, leading to Ph. D. for 3 years, which include fee, maintenance allowance, air travel to UK and back.
14. Scheme of Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowships for Post-graduate Studies, Govt. of India.
15. Nehru Centenary (British) Fellowships/Awards
National Parks/ Sanctuaries/ Museums
1. Rajiv Gandhi (Nagarhole) Wildlife Sanctury, Karnataka
2. Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Sanctury, Andhra Pradesh
3. Indira Gandhi National Park, Tamil Nadu
4. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , New Delhi
5. Indira Gandhi National Park, Anamalai Hills on Western Ghats
6. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park, Vishakhapatnam
7. Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (IGRMS)
8. Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary, Pollachi
9. Rajiv Gandhi Health Museum
10. The Rajiv Gandhi Museum of Natural History
11. Indira Gandhi Memorial museum, New Delhi
12. Jawaharlal Nehru museum in Aurangabad, Maharashtra opened by state govt.
13. Jawaharlal Nehru memorial Gallery, London
14. Jawaharlal Nehru planetarium, Worli, Mumbai.
15. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Exhibition for Children
Hospitals/Medical Institutions
1. Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science, Bangalore, Karnataka
2. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi
3. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry
4. Shri Rajiv Gandhi college of Dental Science & Hospital,  Bangalore, Karnataka
5. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Bio Technology, Thiruvanthapuram, Kerala
6. Rajiv Gandhi College of Nursing, Bangalore, Karnataka
7. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Raichur
8. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases, Bangalore, Karnataka
9. Rajiv Gandhi Paramedical College, Jodhpur
10. Rajiv Gandhi Medical College, Thane, Mumbai
11. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Karnataka
12. Rajiv Gandhi Hospital, Goa
13. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh
14. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Delhi
15. Rajiv Gandhi Homoeaopathic Medical College, Chinar Park, Bhopal, M.P
16. North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences , Shilong, Meghalaya
17. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
18. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore
19. Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sheikhpura, Patna
20. The Indira Gandhi Paediatric Hospital, Afghanistan
21. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health Hospital, Dharmaram College, Bangalore
22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Heath, Bangalore
23. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
24. Indira Gandhi Institute of Dental Science, Kerala
25. Indira Gandhi Memorial Ayurvedic Medical College & Hospital, Bhubaneshwar
26. Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur
27. Indira Gandhi Eye Hospital And Research Centre, Kolkata
28. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Shimla
29. Indira Gandhi Women and Children Hospital , Bhopla
30. Indira Gandhi Gas Relief hospital, Bhopal
31. Kamla Nehru Hospital, Shimla
32. Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya
33. Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research
(JIPMER), Puducherry
Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 127.84 crores
Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 117.51 crores
34. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Bhopal
35. Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College in Raipur.
36. Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College & Hospital, New Delhi
37. Nehru, Science Centre, Worli, Mumbai
38. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, Bhopal
39. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Homoeopathic Medical Sciences,
Maharashtra
Institutions / Chairs / Festivals
1.    Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development. (RGNIYD), Ministry of
Youth and Sports
2. Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute, Faridabad, Haryana
3. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission in Tribal Areas
4. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development
5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Chhattisgarh
6. Rajiv Gandhi Chair Endowment established in 1998 to create a Chair of South
Asian Economics
7. Rajiv Gandhi Project – A pilot to provide Education thru Massive Satellite
Connectivity up grassroot Level
8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited (Government of Karnataka
Enterprise)
9. Rajiv Gandhi Information and Technology Commission
10. Rajiv Gandhi Chair for Peace and Disarmament
11. Rajiv Gandhi Music Festival
12.   Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Lecture
13.    Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Diwas
14.    Rajiv Gandhi Education Foundation, Kerala
15.    Rajiv Gandhi Panchayati Raj Convention
16. The Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Educational and Charitable Society, Kasagod,
Kerala
17. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial trophy ekankika spardha, Prerana Foundation, Kari
Road
18. Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, Janpath, New Delhi
19. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj & Gramin Vikas Sansthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan
20. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam
21. Indira Gandhi  Institute for Development and Research , Mumbai
22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Cardiology (IGIC), Patna
23. Indira Gandhi National Center for the Arts, New Delhi
24. Indira Gandhi National Foundation, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
25. Indira Gandhi Mahila Sahakari Soot Girani Ltd, Maharashtra
26.    Indira Gandhi Conservation Monitoring Centre , Ministry of Environment &
Forest
27.    Post-Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship for Single Girl Child
28.    Jawahar Shetkari Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd.
29. Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan
30.    Jawaharlal Nehru Centenary celebrations
31.    Postal stamps of different denominations and one Rupee coins in memory of
Jawaharlal Nehru.
32.    Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Trust (U.K.) Scholarships
33. Jawaharlal Nehru Custom House Nhava Sheva, Maharashtra
34. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore
35. Jawaharlal Nehru Cultural Centre, Embassy of India, Moscow
36. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Udyog Kendra for Juveniles, Pune, Maharastra
37. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru college of agriculture and research institute ,
Pondicherry
Roads/Buildings/places
1. Rajiv Chowk, Delhi
2. Rajiv Gandhi Bhawan, Safdarjung, New Delhi
3. Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, New Delhi
4. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Kalkaji, Delhi
5. Indira Chowk, New Delhi
6. Nehru Planetarium, New Delhi
7. Nehru Yuvak Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi
8. Nehru Nagar, New Delhi
9. Nehru Place, New Delhi
10. Nehru Park, New Delhi Nehru House, BSZ Marg, New Delhi
11. Jawaharlal Nehru Government House New Delhi
12. Rajiv Gandhi Renewable Energy Park, Gurgaon, Haryana
13. Rajiv Gandhi Chowk, Andheri, Mumbai
14. Indira Gandhi Road, Mumbai
15. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Wadala, Mumbai
16. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Mulund, Mumbai
17. Nehru Nagar, Kurla, Mumbai
18. Jawaharlal Nehru gardens at Thane, Mumbai
19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Hall, Chennai
20. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Vadapalani, Chennai, Tamilnadu
21. Rajiv Gandhi Salai (Old Mahabalipuram road named after Rajiv Gandhi)
22. Rajiv Gandhi Education City, Haryana
23. Mount Rajiv, a peak in Himalaya
24. Rajiv Gandhi IT Habitat, Goa
25. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Chennai
26. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Vijayawada
27. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar in Coimbatore,  Tamil Nadu
28. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Trichy, Tamil Nadu
29. Rajiv Gandhi IT Park, Hinjewadi, Pune
30. Rajiv Gandhi Panchayat Bhav , Palanpur  Banaskantha
31. Rajiv Gandhi Chandigarh Technology Park, Chandigarh
32. Rajiv Gandhi Smriti Van, Jharkhand
33. Rajiv Gandhi statue, Panaji, Goa
34. Rajiv Gandhi Road, Chittoor
35. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial at Sriperumbudur
36. Indira Gandhi Memorial Library, University of Hyderabad
37. Indira Gandhi Musical Fountains, Bangalore
38. Indira Gandhi Planetarium , Lucknow
39. Indira Gandhi Centre for Indian Culture (IGCIC), High Commission of India, Mauritus
40. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , Eastern Ghats of India
41. Indira Gandhi Canal, Ramnagar, Jaisalmer
42. Indira Gandhi Industrial Complex, Ranipet, Vellore District
43. Indira Gandhi Park, Itanagar
44. Indira Gandhi Squiare , Pondicherry
45. Indira Gandhi Road, Willingdon Island, Cochin
46. Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden, Kashmir
47. Indira Gandhi Sagar Dam, Nagpur
48. Indira Gandhi bridge, Rameshvar, Tamil Nadu
49. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Bhiwandi Nizampur Municipal Corporation
50. Indira Gandhi memorial cultural Complex, UP Govt.
51. Indira Gandhi Sports Stadium , Rohru District, Shimla
52. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj Sansthan , Bhopal
53. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Rajasthan
54. Indira Nagar, Lucknow
55. Roads are named after Jawaharlal Nehru in many cities e.g. in Jaipur, Nagpur, Vile Parle, Ghatkopar, Mulund etc.
56. Nehru Nagar, Ghaziabad
57. Jawaharlal Nehru Gardens, Ambarnath
58. Jawarharlal Nehru Gardens, Panhala
59. Jawaharlal Nehru market, Jammu.
60. Jawaharlal Nehru Tunnel on the Jammu Srinagar Highway
61. Nehru Chowk, Ulhas Nagar, Maharashtra.
62. Nehru Bridge on the river Mandvi, Panaji, Goa
63. Nehru Nagar Ghaziabad
64. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Dharmatala, Kolkata
65. Nehru Road, Guwahati
66. Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur
67. Nehru Vihar Colony, Kalyanpur, Lucknow
68. Nehru Nagar, Patna
69. Jawaharlal Nehru Street, Pondicherry
70. Nehru Bazaar, Madanapalli, Tirupathi
71. Nehru Chowk, Bilaspur. M.P
72. Nehru Street, Ponmalaipatti, Tiruchirapalli
73. Nehru Nagar, S.M. Road, Ahmedabad
74. Nehru Nagar,. Nashik Pune Road

The following are some of the Government Schemes and Projects that have been named after the Nehru-Gandhi family.

Central Government Schemes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana, Ministry of Power – A scheme “Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana” for Rural Electricity Infrastructure and Household Electrification was launched for the attainment of the National Common Minimum Programme of providing access to electricity to all Rural Household by 2009. Rural Electrification Corporation (REC) is the nodal agency for the scheme. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana to be continued during the Eleventh Plan period with a capital subsidy of Rs. 28000 Crore; allocation of Rs 5500 crore for FY09.

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (RGNDWM), Ministry of Rural Development, Annual allocation plan 2007-08 was Rs.6,400 crore and Annual allocation plan 2008-09 is Rs.7,300 crore.

3. Rajiv Gandhi National Crèche Scheme for the Children of Working Mothers, Department of Women & Child Development, Ministry of HRD, New Delhi,

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – 91.88 crore.

Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – 91.52 crore

4. Rajiv Gandhi Udyami Mitra Yojana for benefit of NE entrepreneurs, Ministry of Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, Government of India,

Budgetary allocation 2008-9 – Rs. 2.70 crore

Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – Rs.1.12 crore

5. Indira Awas Yojana, Ministry of Rural Areas and Environment – IAY is a CSS funded on cost-sharing basis between the Centre and the States in the ratio of 75:25. In the case of UTs, the entire funds are provided by Centre. The target groups for housing under IAY are households below poverty line living in rural areas, particularly those belonging to SC/ST and freed bonded labourers.

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – Rs. 7919.00 crores

Budgetary allocation  2009-10 – Rs.7914.70 crores

6. Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme – objective to provide social security to workers in the unorganized sector in a phased manner. Budgetary allocation in 2008-09 is Rs. 3,443 crore

7. Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission, Ministry of Urban Development,

Govt. of India – 7 years time frame, 50,000 cr.

Budgetary allocation for 2008 – 9 – 10447.98 crore

Budgetary allocation for 2009-10 – 10713.84 crore

8. Jawaharlal Nehru Rojgar Yojna – Ministry of Labour and Employment – A Self- employment programme for urban poor

9. Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Kalyan Yojna, Employees’ State Insurance Corporation

10. Indira Gandhi Canal Project, Funded by World Bank

11. Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojana, Union Ministry of Textiles, in association with ICICI Lombard General Insurance Company Limited

12. Indira Vikas Patra

State Government Schemes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Rehabilitation Package for Tsunami Affected Areas, Govt. of Tamil Nadu, Budgetary Allocation Rs.2347.19 crores

2. Rajiv Gandhi Social Security Scheme for poor people, Department of Revenue and Disaster Management, Govt. of Puducherry

3. Rajiv Ratna Awas Yojna – Congress party president and United Progressive Alliance (UPA) Chairperson Sonia Gandhi had announced that the Centre would give a package of Rs.1,500-crore for providing housing facilities to the poorer sections in Delhi, thus announcing the scheme.

4. Rajiv Gandhi Prathamik Shiksha Mission , Raigarh

5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Madhya Pradesh

6. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Food Security , Madhya Pradesh

7. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh

8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited is a Government Company established by the Government of Karnataka to cater to the housing needs of the Economically and Socially weaker sections of the society.  Registered in April 2000, its authorised Capital is Rs.10 crores with Rs.3 crore  paid up.

9. Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Development Mission, Rajasthan

10. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Literacy Programme, Assam

11. Rajiv Gandhi Swavlamban Rojgar Yojana, Govt. of NCT of Delhi

12. Rajiv Gandhi Mobile Aids Counseling and Testing Services, Rajiv Gandhi Foundation

13. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyarthi Suraksha Yojana, Maharashtra

14. Rajiv Gandhi Mission for Water Shed Management, M.P.

15. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission for Tribal Areas, MP

16. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry

17. Rajiv Gandhi Breakfast Scheme, Pondicherry

18. Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Divas, Punjab

19. Rajiv Gandhi Artisans Health and Life Insurance Scheme, Tamil Nadu

20. Rajiv Gandhi Zopadpatti and Nivara Prakalpa, Mumbai

21. Rajiv Arogya Sri programme , Gujrat State Govt. Scheme

22. Rajiv Gandhi Abhyudaya Yojana, AP

23. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Saksharta Mission, Jabalpur

24. Rajiv Gandhi Bridges and Roads Infrastructure Development Programme for the construction of new roads and bridges and strengthening of the existing ones in the state of Haryana

25. Rajiv Gandhi Gramin Niwara Prakalp, Maharashtra Govt.

26. Indira Gandhi Utkrishtha Chhattervritti Yojna for Post Plus Two Students, Himachal Pradesh Government Scheme, Sponsored by, Central Government

27. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme, Maharashtra Govt.

28. Indira Gandhi Prathisthan, Housing and Urban Planning Department, UP Govt

29. Indira Kranthi Patham Scheme, Andhra Pradesh

30. Indira Gandhi Nahar Pariyojana, State Govt. Scheme

31. Indira Gandhi Vruddha Bhumiheen Shetmajoor Anudan Yojana, Govt. of Maharashtra

32. Indira Gandhi Nahar Project  (IGNP), Jaisalmer, Govt. of Rajasthan

33. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Yojna, Govt. of Maharashtra

34. Indira Gandhi kuppam, State Govt. Welfare Scheme for Tsunami effected fishermen

35. Indira Gandhi Drinking Water Scheme-2006, Haryana Govt.

36. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Old, Landless, Destitute women farm labour Scheme,

Maharashtra Govt.

37. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme , Maharashtra Govt.

38. Indira Gaon Ganga Yojana, Chattisgarh

39. Indira Sahara Yojana , Chattisgarh

40. Indira Soochna Shakti Yojana, Chattisgarh

41. Indira Gandhi Balika Suraksha Yojana , HP

42. Indira Gandhi Garibi Hatao Yojana (DPIP), MP

43. Indira Gandhi super thermal power project , Haryana Govt.

44. Indira Gandhi Water Project, Haryana Govt.

45. Indira Gandhi Sagar Project , Bhandara District Gosikhurd Maharashtra

46. Indira Jeevitha Bima Pathakam, AP Govt

47. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshani Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.

48. Indira Mahila Yojana Scheme, Meghalaya Govt

49. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, Chhattisgarh Govt.

50. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.

51. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, The government of Andhra Pradesh helped most of the respondent families in acquiring female calves through this scheme.

52. Indira Gandhi Landless Agriculture Labour scheme, Maharashtra Govt.

Sports/Tournaments/Trophies 

1. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup Kabaddi Tournament

2. Rajiv Gandhi Sadbhavana Run

3. Rajiv Gandhi Federation Cup boxing championship

4. Rajiv Gandhi International tournament (football)

5. NSCI – Rajiv Gandhi road races, New Delhi

6. Rajiv Gandhi Boat Race, Kerala

7. Rajiv Gandhi International Artistic Gymnastic Tournament

8. Rajiv Gandhi Kabbadi Meet

9. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Roller Skating Championship

10. Rajiv Gandhi memorial marathon race, New Delhi

11. Rajiv Gandhi International Judo Championship, Chandigarh

12. Rajeev Gandhi Memorial Trophy for the Best College, Calicut

13. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Cricket Tournament, Initiated by Rahul Gandhi in Amethi

14. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup (U-21), football

15. Rajiv Gandhi Trophy (football)

16. Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Sportspersons

17. All Indira Rajiv Gandhi Basketball (Girls) Tournament, organized by Delhi State

18. All India Rajiv Gandhi Wrestling Gold Cup, organized by Delhi State

19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Jhopadpatti Football Tournament, Rajura

20. Rajiv Gandhi International Invitation Gold Cup Football Tournament, Jamshedpur

21. Rajiv Gandhi Mini Olympics, Mumbai

22. Rajiv Gandhi Beachball Kabaddi Federation

23. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Trophy Prerana Foundation

24. International Indira Gandhi Gold Cup Tournament

25. Indira Gandhi International Hockey Tournament

26. Indira Gandhi Boat Race

27. Jawaharlal Nehru International Gold Cup Football Tournament.

28. Jawaharlal Nehru Hockey Tournament.

Stadia

1. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Delhi

2. Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium, New Delhi

3. Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, New Delhi

4. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Stadium, Bawana

5. Rajiv Gandhi National Football Academy, Haryana

6. Rajiv Gandhi AC Stadium, Vishakhapatnam

7. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Pondicherry

8. Rajiv Gandhi Stadium, Nahariagun, Itanagar

9. Rajiv Gandhi Badminton Indoor Stadium, Cochin

10. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Kadavanthra,Ernakulam

11. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Complex , Singhu

12. Rajib Gandhi Memorial Sports Complex, Guwahati

13. Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad

14. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Cochin

15. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh

16. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Una, Himachal Pradesh

17. Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Vishakhapatnam

18. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Deogarh, Rajasthan

19. Gandhi Stadium, Bolangir, Orissa

Airports/ Ports

1. Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, New Hyderabad, A.P.

2. Rajiv Gandhi Container Terminal, Cochin

3. Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi

4. Indira Gandhi Dock, Mumbai

5. Jawaharlal Nehru Nava Sheva Port Trust, Mumbai

Total budgetary plan outlay 2008-9  – 69.92crore

Total budgetary plan outlay 2009-10 – 324 crore

Universities/Education Institutes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Indian Institute of Management, Shilong

2. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Ranchi, Jharkhand

3. Rajiv Gandhi Technical University, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.

4. Rajiv Gandhi School of Intellectual Property Law, Kharagpur, Kolkata

5. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Secundrabad

6. Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law, Patiala, Punjab

7. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports

Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 1.50 crore

Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 3.00 crore

8. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Begumpet, Hyderabad, A.P

9. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam, Kerala

10. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering Research & Technology, Chandrapur, Maharashtra

11. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Airoli, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra

12. Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh

13. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Chola Nagar, Bangalore, Karnataka

14. Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.

15. Rajiv Gandhi D.e.d. College, Latur, Maharashtra

16. Rajiv Gandhi College, Shahpura, Bhopal

17. Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies, New Delhi

18. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Raebareli, U.P.

19. Rajiv Gandhi Homeopathic Medical College, Bhopal, M.P.

20. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Post Graduate Studies, East Godavari District, A.P.

21. Rajiv Gandhi College of Education, Thumkur, Karnataka

22. Rajiv Gandhi College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu

23. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of IT and Biotechnology, Bhartiya Vidhyapeeth

24. Rajiv Gandhi High School, Mumbai, Maharashtra

25. Rajiv Gandhi Group of Institutions, Satna, M.P.

26. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur, Tamil Nadu

27. Rajiv Gandhi Biotechnology Centre, R.T.M., Nagpur University

28. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

29. Rajiv Gandhi Mahavidyalaya, Madhya Pradesh

30. Rajiv Gandhi Post Graduate College, Allahabad, U.P.

31. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka

32. Rajiv Gandhi Govt. PG Ayurvedic College, Poprola, Himachal Pradesh

33. Rajiv Gandhi College, Satna, M.P.

34. Rajiv Gandhi Academy for Aviation Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

35. Rajiv Gandhi Madhyamic Vidyalaya, Maharashtra

36. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Contemporary Studies, Islamabad, Pakistan

37. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

38. Rajiv Gandhi Industrial Training Centre, Gandhinagar

39. Rajiv Gandhi University of Knowledge Technologies, Andhra Pradesh

40. Rajiv Gandhi Institute Of Distance Education, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu

41. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture , Tamil Nadu

42. Rajiv Gandhi University (Arunachal University), A.P.

43. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Medicine Centre (RGSMC), Kerela

44. Rajiv Gandhi Science Centre, Mauritus

45. Rajiv Gandhi Kala Mandir, Ponda, Goa

46. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyalaya, Mulund, Mumbai

47. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Polytechnic, Bangalore, Karnataka

48. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Circle Telecom Training Centre (India), Chennai

49. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Kasagod, Kerala

50. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College Of Aeronautics, Jaipur

51. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial First Grade College, Shimoga

52. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College of Education, Jammu & Kashmir

53. Rajiv Gandhi South Campus, Barkacha, Varanasi

54. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Teacher’s Training College, Jharkhand

55. Rajiv Gandhi Degree College, Rajahmundry, A.P.

56. Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), New Delhi

57. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development & Research, Mumbai, Maharashtra

58. Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy, Dehradun

59. Indira Gandhi RashtriyaUran Akademi, Fursatganj Airfield, Rae Bareli, Uttar Pradesh

60. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai

61. Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Orissa

62. Indira Gandhi B.Ed. College, Mangalore

63. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Education, Nanded, Maharashtra

64. Indira Gandhi Balika Niketan B.ED. College, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan

65. Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur, Madhya Pradesh

66. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Engineering, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra

67. Smt. Indira Gandhi Colelge, Tiruchirappalli

68. Indira Gandhi Engineering College, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh

69. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kashmere Gate, Delhi

70. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Sarang, Dist. Dhenkanal, Orissa

71. Indira Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Pune, Maharashtra

72. Indira Gandhi Integral Education Centre, New Delhi

73. Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, Delhi University, Delhi

74. Indira Gandhi High School, Himachal

75. Indira Kala Sangit Vishwavidyalaya, Chhattisgarh

76. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

77. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Andhra Pradesh

78. Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, Uttarakashi

79. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Business Management, Vikram University

80. Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

81. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore

82. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, AP

83. Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

84. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced Scientific Research, a deemed university, Jakkur, P.O. Bangalore

85. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Social Studies, affiliated to Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapith (Pune, Maharashtra)

86. Jawaharlal Nehru College of Aeronautics & Applied Sciences, Coimbatore, (ESTD 1968)

87. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Katraj, Dhankwdi, Pune, Maharashtra

88. Kamal Kishore Kadam’s Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

89. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Education & Technological Research, Nanded, Maharashra

90. Jawaharlal Nehru College, Aligarh

91. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad

92. Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Jabalpur

93. Jawaharlal Nehru B.Ed. College, Kota, Rajasthan

94. Jawaharlal Nehru P.G. College, Bhopal

95. Jawaharlal Nehru Government Engineering College, Sundernagar, District Mandi, H.P.

96. Jawaharlal Nehru PublicSchool, Kolar Road, Bhopal

97. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kakinada, A.P.

98. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Ibrahimpatti, Andhra Pradesh

Awards

1.   Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Achievement

2.   Rajiv Gandhi Shiromani Award

3.   Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Awards, Delhi Labour Welfare Board

4.   Rajiv Gandhi National Sadbhavana Award

5.   Rajiv Gandhi Manav Seva Award

6.   Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Conservation Award

7.   Rajiv Gandhi National Award Scheme for Original Book Writing on Gyan Vigyan

8.   Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award

9.   Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award, Instituted by Bureau of Indian Standards in 1991

10.   Rajiv Gandhi Environment Award for Clean Technology, Ministry of Environment & Forest, Govt. of India

11.   RajivGandhi Travelling Scholarship

12.   Rajiv Gandhi(UK) Foundation Scholarship

13.   Rajiv Gandhi Film Awards (Mumbai)

14.   Rajiv Gandhi Khelratna Puraskar

15.   Rajiv Gandhi Parisara Prashasti, Karnataka

16.   RajivGandhi Vocational Excellence Awards

17.   Rajiv Gandhi Excellence award

18.   Indira Gandhi Peace Prize

19.   Indira Gandhi Prize for National Integration

20.   Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Award

21.   Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Awards, Ministry of Environment   and Forests

22.    Indira Gandhi Memorial National Award forBest Environmental & Ecological

23.    Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Purashkar

24.    Indira Gandhi NSS Award

25.    Indira Gandhi Award for National Integration

26.    Indira Gandhi Official Language Award Scheme

27. Indira Gandhi Award for Best First Film

28. Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Awards for The Town Official Language

29. Indira Gandhi Prize” for Peace, Disarmament and Development

30. Indira Gandhi Prize for Popularization of Science

31. Implementation

32. Indira Gandhi Shiromani Award

33. Indira Gandhi NSS Award/National Youth

34. Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Pushar award – search n correct

35. Indira Gandhi N.S.S Awards

36. Indira Gandhi award for social service, MP Govt.

37.    Post Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship Scheme

38.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Award Scheme

39.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Shield Scheme

40.    Indira Gandhi Vision of Wildlife Conservation Zoo, a seminar organized by Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy.

41. Jawaharlal Nehru award for International peace worth Rs 15 lakh cash given to many international figures, every year, including Yasser Arafat of Palestine Liberation Front in 1988 and U Thant in 1965.

42. Soviet Land Nehru Award, a cash prize of Rs. 20,000 given to Shyam Benegal in Dec 89, in recognition of the above film.

43. Jawaharlal Nehru Balkalyan awards of Rs.10,000 each to 10 couples by Govt. of Maharashtra (ToI-28-4-89).

44. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi, for Academic Achievement

45. Jawaharlal Nehru birth centenary research award for energy

46. Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding

47. Nehru Bal Samiti Bravery Awards

48. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medal

49. Jawaharlal Nehru Prize” from 1998-99, to be given to organizations (preferably   NGOs) for Popularization of Science.

50. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Competition

51. Jawarharlal Nehru Student Award for research project of evolution of DNA

Scholarship / Fellowship

1. Rajiv Gandhi Scholarship Scheme for Students with Disabilities

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for SC/ST Candidates, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment

Budgetary Allocation for 2008-9 – 26.40 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 23.70 crores

3. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for ST Candidates

Budgetary Allocation for 2008-09 – 29.00 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 42.00 crores

4. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, IGNOU

5. Rajiv Gandhi Science Talent Research Fellows

6. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, Ministry of Tribal Affairs

Budgetary Allocation for  2008-9  – 16.00 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 22.50  crores

7. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for scheduled castes and scheduled tribes candidates given by University Grants Commission

8. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship sponsored by the Commonwealth of Learning in association with Indira Gandhi National Open University

9. Rajiv Gandhi science talent research fellowship given by Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced scientific research (to promote budding scientists) done in tandem with Department of Science and Technology and Rajiv Gandhi Foundation

10. Rajiv Gandhi HUDCO Fellowships in the Habitat Sector (to promote research in the field of sustainable Habitat development) for MPhil, {PhD Students for 2 to 3 years, conferred by HUDCO

11. Indira Gandhi Memorial Fellowships check

12. Fullbright scholarship now renamed Fullbright- Jawaharlal Nehru Scholarship

13. Cambridge Nehru Scholarships, 10 in number, for research at Cambridge University, London, leading to Ph. D. for 3 years, which include fee, maintenance allowance, air travel to UK and back.

14. Scheme of Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowships for Post-graduate Studies, Govt. of India.

15. Nehru Centenary (British) Fellowships/Awards

National Parks/ Sanctuaries/ Museums 

1. Rajiv Gandhi (Nagarhole) Wildlife Sanctury, Karnataka

2. Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Sanctury, Andhra Pradesh

3. Indira Gandhi National Park, Tamil Nadu

4. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , New Delhi

5. Indira Gandhi National Park, Anamalai Hills on Western Ghats

6. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park, Vishakhapatnam

7. Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (IGRMS)

8. Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary, Pollachi

9. Rajiv Gandhi Health Museum

10. The Rajiv Gandhi Museum of Natural History

11. Indira Gandhi Memorial museum, New Delhi

12. Jawaharlal Nehru museum in Aurangabad, Maharashtra opened by state govt.

13. Jawaharlal Nehru memorial Gallery, London

14. Jawaharlal Nehru planetarium, Worli, Mumbai.

15. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Exhibition for Children

Hospitals/Medical Institutions

1. Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science, Bangalore, Karnataka

2. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi

3. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry

4. Shri Rajiv Gandhi college of Dental Science & Hospital,  Bangalore, Karnataka

5. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Bio Technology, Thiruvanthapuram, Kerala

6. Rajiv Gandhi College of Nursing, Bangalore, Karnataka

7. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Raichur

8. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases, Bangalore, Karnataka

9. Rajiv Gandhi Paramedical College, Jodhpur

10. Rajiv Gandhi Medical College, Thane, Mumbai

11. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Karnataka

12. Rajiv Gandhi Hospital, Goa

13. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh

14. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Delhi

15. Rajiv Gandhi Homoeaopathic Medical College, Chinar Park, Bhopal, M.P

16. North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences , Shilong, Meghalaya

17. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

18. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore

19. Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sheikhpura, Patna

20. The Indira Gandhi Paediatric Hospital, Afghanistan

21. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health Hospital, Dharmaram College, Bangalore

22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Heath, Bangalore

23. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

24. Indira Gandhi Institute of Dental Science, Kerala

25. Indira Gandhi Memorial Ayurvedic Medical College & Hospital, Bhubaneshwar

26. Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur

27. Indira Gandhi Eye Hospital And Research Centre, Kolkata

28. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Shimla

29. Indira Gandhi Women and Children Hospital , Bhopla

30. Indira Gandhi Gas Relief hospital, Bhopal

31. Kamla Nehru Hospital, Shimla

32. Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya

33. Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry

Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 127.84 crores

Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 117.51 crores

34. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Bhopal

35. Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College in Raipur.

36. Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College & Hospital, New Delhi

37. Nehru, Science Centre, Worli, Mumbai

38. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, Bhopal

39. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Homoeopathic Medical Sciences, Maharashtra

Institutions / Chairs / Festivals

1. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development. (RGNIYD), Ministry of  Youth and Sports

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute, Faridabad, Haryana

3. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission in Tribal Areas

4. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development

5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Chhattisgarh

6. Rajiv Gandhi Chair Endowment established in 1998 to create a Chair of South Asian Economics

7. Rajiv Gandhi Project – A pilot to provide Education thru Massive Satellite Connectivity up grassroot Level

8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited (Government of Karnataka Enterprise)

9. Rajiv Gandhi Information and Technology Commission

10. Rajiv Gandhi Chair for Peace and Disarmament

11. Rajiv Gandhi Music Festival

12.   Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Lecture

13.    Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Diwas

14.    Rajiv Gandhi Education Foundation, Kerala

15.    Rajiv Gandhi Panchayati Raj Convention

16. The Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Educational and Charitable Society, Kasagod,Kerala

17. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial trophy ekankika spardha, Prerana Foundation, Kari Road

18. Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, Janpath, New Delhi

19. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj & Gramin Vikas Sansthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan

20. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam

21. Indira Gandhi  Institute for Development and Research , Mumbai

22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Cardiology (IGIC), Patna

23. Indira Gandhi National Center for the Arts, New Delhi

24. Indira Gandhi National Foundation, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

25. Indira Gandhi Mahila Sahakari Soot Girani Ltd, Maharashtra

26.    Indira Gandhi Conservation Monitoring Centre , Ministry of Environment & Forest

27.    Post-Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship for Single Girl Child

28.    Jawahar Shetkari Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd.

29. Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan

30.    Jawaharlal Nehru Centenary celebrations

31.    Postal stamps of different denominations and one Rupee coins in memory of Jawaharlal Nehru.

32.    Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Trust (U.K.) Scholarships

33. Jawaharlal Nehru Custom House Nhava Sheva, Maharashtra

34. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore

35. Jawaharlal Nehru Cultural Centre, Embassy of India, Moscow

36. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Udyog Kendra for Juveniles, Pune, Maharastra

37. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru college of agriculture and research institute , Pondicherry

Roads/Buildings/places

1. Rajiv Chowk, Delhi

2. Rajiv Gandhi Bhawan, Safdarjung, New Delhi

3. Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, New Delhi

4. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Kalkaji, Delhi

5. Indira Chowk, New Delhi

6. Nehru Planetarium, New Delhi

7. Nehru Yuvak Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi

8. Nehru Nagar, New Delhi

9. Nehru Place, New Delhi

10. Nehru Park, New Delhi Nehru House, BSZ Marg, New Delhi

11. Jawaharlal Nehru Government House New Delhi

12. Rajiv Gandhi Renewable Energy Park, Gurgaon, Haryana

13. Rajiv Gandhi Chowk, Andheri, Mumbai

14. Indira Gandhi Road, Mumbai

15. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Wadala, Mumbai

16. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Mulund, Mumbai

17. Nehru Nagar, Kurla, Mumbai

18. Jawaharlal Nehru gardens at Thane, Mumbai

19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Hall, Chennai

20. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Vadapalani, Chennai, Tamilnadu

21. Rajiv Gandhi Salai (Old Mahabalipuram road named after Rajiv Gandhi)

22. Rajiv Gandhi Education City, Haryana

23. Mount Rajiv, a peak in Himalaya

24. Rajiv Gandhi IT Habitat, Goa

25. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Chennai

26. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Vijayawada

27. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar in Coimbatore,  Tamil Nadu

28. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Trichy, Tamil Nadu

29. Rajiv Gandhi IT Park, Hinjewadi, Pune

30. Rajiv Gandhi Panchayat Bhav , Palanpur  Banaskantha

31. Rajiv Gandhi Chandigarh Technology Park, Chandigarh

32. Rajiv Gandhi Smriti Van, Jharkhand

33. Rajiv Gandhi statue, Panaji, Goa

34. Rajiv Gandhi Road, Chittoor

35. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial at Sriperumbudur

36. Indira Gandhi Memorial Library, University of Hyderabad

37. Indira Gandhi Musical Fountains, Bangalore

38. Indira Gandhi Planetarium , Lucknow

39. Indira Gandhi Centre for Indian Culture (IGCIC), High Commission of India, Mauritus

40. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , Eastern Ghats of India

41. Indira Gandhi Canal, Ramnagar, Jaisalmer

42. Indira Gandhi Industrial Complex, Ranipet, Vellore District

43. Indira Gandhi Park, Itanagar

44. Indira Gandhi Squiare , Pondicherry

45. Indira Gandhi Road, Willingdon Island, Cochin

46. Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden, Kashmir

47. Indira Gandhi Sagar Dam, Nagpur

48. Indira Gandhi bridge, Rameshvar, Tamil Nadu

49. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Bhiwandi Nizampur Municipal Corporation

50. Indira Gandhi memorial cultural Complex, UP Govt.

51. Indira Gandhi Sports Stadium , Rohru District, Shimla

52. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj Sansthan , Bhopal

53. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Rajasthan

54. Indira Nagar, Lucknow

55. Roads are named after Jawaharlal Nehru in many cities e.g. in Jaipur, Nagpur, Vile Parle, Ghatkopar, Mulund etc.

56. Nehru Nagar, Ghaziabad

57. Jawaharlal Nehru Gardens, Ambarnath

58. Jawarharlal Nehru Gardens, Panhala

59. Jawaharlal Nehru market, Jammu.

60. Jawaharlal Nehru Tunnel on the Jammu Srinagar Highway

61. Nehru Chowk, Ulhas Nagar, Maharashtra.

62. Nehru Bridge on the river Mandvi, Panaji, Goa

63. Nehru Nagar Ghaziabad

64. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Dharmatala, Kolkata

65. Nehru Road, Guwahati

66. Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur

67. Nehru Vihar Colony, Kalyanpur, Lucknow

68. Nehru Nagar, Patna

69. Jawaharlal Nehru Street, Pondicherry

70. Nehru Bazaar, Madanapalli, Tirupathi

71. Nehru Chowk, Bilaspur. M.P

72. Nehru Street, Ponmalaipatti, Tiruchirapalli

73. Nehru Nagar, S.M. Road, Ahmedabad

74. Nehru Nagar,. Nashik Pune Road

The entire details of the schemes are available in Suryaprakash’s blog.

Related article : From Cradle to grave, be grateful to Nehru-Gandhis!

June 25, 2009

Delhi fiddles while the northeast burns

Filed under: India — thecandideye @ 6:29 AM
Tags: , , , , , ,

From Tarun Vijay, editor of RSS weekly Panchjanya.Appeared on Rediff, few years ago.

Visiting Nagaland makes you feel different. You have to procure an inner line permit to enter. The permit demands to know why I am going there, where I shall stay and to be sure about my credentials I needed a guaranteer to vouch for me, my safe conduct and return within the stated period. Issued by the deputy commissioner’s office this permit is governed under the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation Act 1873. Yes, 1873.
The British left India in 1947. We are celebrating the 60th anniversary of that freedom obtained after our motherland’s division and the massacres that followed. Still, I needed a permit, something that the British began to isolate these regions in the name of ‘protecting’ the local indigenous people. The same procedure is also in vogue in Arunachal Pradesh.
So, we, legitimate Indians, are required to obtain a permit — another name for a ‘visa’ — but these states are reeling under the heat of illegal Muslim infiltrators from Bangladesh, who, obviously do not need to get an permit to enter, buy land, marry local girls and become so dominant that even the state authorities feel afraid to oust them.
Arunachal Pradesh’s student bodies recently compelled Chief Minister Dorjee Khandu to take action against the Bangladeshis. So what did he do? He pushed a couple of thousands to Assam and the matter ended. In Assam it created a furore. The Muslim bodies, specially the All Assam Minorities Students Union, threatened to oust Hindus from Muslim majority districts like Dhubri, Goalpara and Barpeta, so Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi ‘certified’ that all those ousted by the Arunachal Pradesh government are Assamese and shall be accommodated in Barpeta!
The situation is so serious and Delhi’s apathy so mindboggling that the people have lost all hope. The All Assam Students Union, which spearheaded an unprecedented movement in the 1980s to oust Bangladeshi infiltrators, has in utter desperation said that in the next ten years Assam may have a Bangladeshi chief minister. Strong and alarming words indeed. But neither the media nor the political parties paid any attention.
Assam has been transformed beyond recognition. The state’s cultural identity is symbolised by the great reformer and rejuvenator Srimat Sankar Dev. His birthlace in Dhing, near Bardowa, is a must-visit pilgrim centre for every Assamese Hindu. Now the Dhing assembly constituency has 90.02 percent Muslims. No prizes to guess how this Hindu pilgrim centre became a Muslim majority town because of the Bangladeshi influx.
Assam’s latest political star is Maulana Badruddin Ajmal, a perfume tycoon, who formed a new political party, the United Democratic Front, in 2005 and won 10 seats in the 2006 assembly election, surprising everyone. Previously he used to remote control other secular parties. Now he has taken the reins in his hands.
Assam and other northeastern states have become more volatile than Kashmir, but Delhi’s page three media and corrupt polity don’t see beyond their immediate concerns.
After Assam and Arunachal Pradesh, it is Nagaland’s turn now. Bangladeshi jihadi factories supplying men and material are creating havoc from Itanagar to Kohima and Hyderabad. They are there before everybody’s eyes, yet no government has shown a steely resolve to identify them and send them back. Aliens are turned into voters for political gain. The lines dividing traitors and patriots are getting blurred. Patriotic people need permits, they are made to live a refugee’s life, but aliens feel quite confident and vocal to aggressively enter our country, bomb it and yet find sympathies in the corridors of power.
In Nagaland, people are sandwiched between the insurgent groups and the Bangladeshi influx. The headquarters of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (Issac-Muivah group) is in Hebron, 30 odd kilometres from Dimapur. Everywhere, while going to Kohima one can see posters demanding ‘quick results of peace talks’ and a greater Nagalim which they want in the name of Christ — a separate independent country. According to government sources there are about 75,000 Bangladeshi Muslims in Nagaland today.
I had come to attend a seminar organised by a daring tribal organisation, the Janajati Vikas Samiti, which had invited about 80 participants from the northeastern states. Nagaland Home Minister Thenucho inaugurated the conference. Former state secretary C M Chang headed the organising committee. It was incredible to see so many tribal leaders engrossed in what can be termed a free discussion on the problems Nagaland faces — Bangladeshi infiltration being the foremost.
Minister Thenucho was forthcoming and said this problem has to be seen as a demographic invasion. ‘The Naga people may be soon reduced to miserable sufferers by these infiltrators, who may appear as an asset for providing cheap labour and easily available hands for menial jobs. But look what they have done elsewhere and there is no guarantee that they will not do the same here. Today they work as labourers; tomorrow Nagas will have to work for them, if we do not stand up and say no to them,’ the minister said. He was serious.
The only problem is the Centre does not share their anxieties. Nothing that binds Naga society with the rest of the country has ever been encouraged and strengthened. Natwar Thakkar started his Gandhi ashram in Mokukchang but could never expand his mission of spreading Gandhi’s sublime thoughts beyond that.
To be in Kohima is still considered a matter of fear, pregnant with life and death questions. There is no icon of India that can be seen here. In the early 1980s a Gandhi statue was installed in Kohima, only to be desecrated and destroyed soon. ‘Nagaland doesn’t need any Indian’s statue’ was the decree issued by the insurgents.
Almost everyone, from IAS officers to traders and teachers, have to cough up a part of their earnings to the insurgents. Their ‘freedom days’, ‘republic days’ are celebrated in full public view with the media from Kolkata and Delhi in attendance. Presently there is a ceasefire between the NSCN (IM) and the Indian Army, but rumours are afloat that this period has been better utilised by the insurgents to reinforce its battalions with new recruits, procure better weapons and resources to press for its demand for an ‘independent ‘Nagalim’, which seeks to ‘add’ parts of Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh to its fold.
This has enraged Manipuri and Arunachali tribals and a tribal war cannot be ruled out if the Naga insurgents’ demand is given any sympathy.
The press is lively but cocooned in its own world. “We have never been invited to join any prime minister’s party on his foreign visits, Delhi and Kolkata papers reach us very late, after a day or two, that too the dak edition,’ said Geoffrey Yaden, editor of the Nagaland Post, the main daily newspaper in the state. “They don’t understand us properly, they write to please their egos. Nobody has the time and interest to understand our people or to make serious efforts to create bridges and strengthen national feelings here. Are politicians sitting in Delhi are bothered about us or the nation?” he lamented.
I know it is very difficult to have a Delhi leader or social activist or cultural tsar to find time for a northeast visit. How many of us would go to Manipur or Nagaland or Arunachal for a family trip? Do we know that the most scintillating lakes, mountains, rivers and forests are in the northeast, bettering even Kashmir’s panorama? Unfortunately the northeast has yet to register in our minds as markedly as Hardwar, Manali, Goa [Images] or Rameshwaram.
Corruption to the northeast’s politicians is ‘taught’ by politicians in New Delhi. Even to get a central grant released for these states, central ministers and their durbaris have to be suitably ‘pleased’. The grants that go to the northeast finally come back in large parts to the Delhi durbar through traders, contractors, commission agents and sanctioning ministers. The rest is divided amongst local ‘beneficiaries’, including the insurgents.
In view of the infiltration threat faced by Nagaland and other northeastern states, an observation by E Ramamohan, the former director general, Border Security Force, who was with me in Kohima, should be an eyeopener. He warns about the insurgent groups’ long-term planning for 2015 — “Today there are several Islamic fundamentalist insurgent groups in Assam, all created with the help of the Director General Forces Intelligence of Bangladesh and Pakistan’s Inter Services Intelligence. The main groups are the Muslim United Liberation Front of Assam, the Muslim United Tigers of Assam and the Islamic Liberation Army of Assam… what is most interesting that these Islamic fundamentalist groups have not started operations so far. Interrogations of the suspects and intelligence reports have revealed that they are in a preparation phase. Motivating and recruiting cadres, training them in Pakistan, stockpiling arms and explosives for the insurgency is their present strategy. The target is (to launch an assault) in 2015.”
Why can’t we understand that India shrinks from every inch that is occupied by Bangladeshi infiltrators in our territory? In less than 100 years India has shrunk like no other nation on earth.
We lost Taxila, Karachi, Dhaka. Post independence, we lost 1.25 lakh square kilometres of land to Pakistan and China. Beijing [Images] still eyes Arunachal Pradesh.
Then Indians lost lands and homes in the Kashmir valley and became refugees for the ‘sin’ of supporting India. Now, jihadis, Maoists and church-supported insurgents want their share. Where will this all lead to? All the power, position, money and glitter weigh nothing before the question of the nation’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. At least in the northeast, people feel nobody listens to their woes in Delhi.

Visiting Nagaland makes you feel different. You have to procure an inner line permit to enter. The permit demands to know why I am going there, where I shall stay and to be sure about my credentials I needed a guaranteer to vouch for me, my safe conduct and return within the stated period. Issued by the deputy commissioner’s office this permit is governed under the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation Act 1873. Yes, 1873.

The British left India in 1947. We are celebrating the 60th anniversary of that freedom obtained after our motherland’s division and the massacres that followed. Still, I needed a permit, something that the British began to isolate these regions in the name of ‘protecting’ the local indigenous people. The same procedure is also in vogue in Arunachal Pradesh.

So, we, legitimate Indians, are required to obtain a permit — another name for a ‘visa’ — but these states are reeling under the heat of illegal Muslim infiltrators from Bangladesh, who, obviously do not need to get an permit to enter, buy land, marry local girls and become so dominant that even the state authorities feel afraid to oust them.

Arunachal Pradesh’s student bodies recently compelled Chief Minister Dorjee Khandu to take action against the Bangladeshis. So what did he do? He pushed a couple of thousands to Assam and the matter ended. In Assam it created a furore. The Muslim bodies, specially the All Assam Minorities Students Union, threatened to oust Hindus from Muslim majority districts like Dhubri, Goalpara and Barpeta, so Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi ‘certified’ that all those ousted by the Arunachal Pradesh government are Assamese and shall be accommodated in Barpeta!

The situation is so serious and Delhi’s apathy so mindboggling that the people have lost all hope. The All Assam Students Union, which spearheaded an unprecedented movement in the 1980s to oust Bangladeshi infiltrators, has in utter desperation said that in the next ten years Assam may have a Bangladeshi chief minister. Strong and alarming words indeed. But neither the media nor the political parties paid any attention.

Assam has been transformed beyond recognition. The state’s cultural identity is symbolised by the great reformer and rejuvenator Srimat Sankar Dev. His birthlace in Dhing, near Bardowa, is a must-visit pilgrim centre for every Assamese Hindu. Now the Dhing assembly constituency has 90.02 percent Muslims. No prizes to guess how this Hindu pilgrim centre became a Muslim majority town because of the Bangladeshi influx.

Assam’s latest political star is Maulana Badruddin Ajmal, a perfume tycoon, who formed a new political party, the United Democratic Front, in 2005 and won 10 seats in the 2006 assembly election, surprising everyone. Previously he used to remote control other secular parties. Now he has taken the reins in his hands.

Assam and other northeastern states have become more volatile than Kashmir, but Delhi’s page three media and corrupt polity don’t see beyond their immediate concerns.

After Assam and Arunachal Pradesh, it is Nagaland’s turn now. Bangladeshi jihadi factories supplying men and material are creating havoc from Itanagar to Kohima and Hyderabad. They are there before everybody’s eyes, yet no government has shown a steely resolve to identify them and send them back. Aliens are turned into voters for political gain. The lines dividing traitors and patriots are getting blurred. Patriotic people need permits, they are made to live a refugee’s life, but aliens feel quite confident and vocal to aggressively enter our country, bomb it and yet find sympathies in the corridors of power.

In Nagaland, people are sandwiched between the insurgent groups and the Bangladeshi influx. The headquarters of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (Issac-Muivah group) is in Hebron, 30 odd kilometres from Dimapur. Everywhere, while going to Kohima one can see posters demanding ‘quick results of peace talks’ and a greater Nagalim which they want in the name of Christ — a separate independent country. According to government sources there are about 75,000 Bangladeshi Muslims in Nagaland today.

I had come to attend a seminar organised by a daring tribal organisation, the Janajati Vikas Samiti, which had invited about 80 participants from the northeastern states. Nagaland Home Minister Thenucho inaugurated the conference. Former state secretary C M Chang headed the organising committee. It was incredible to see so many tribal leaders engrossed in what can be termed a free discussion on the problems Nagaland faces — Bangladeshi infiltration being the foremost.

Minister Thenucho was forthcoming and said this problem has to be seen as a demographic invasion. ‘The Naga people may be soon reduced to miserable sufferers by these infiltrators, who may appear as an asset for providing cheap labour and easily available hands for menial jobs. But look what they have done elsewhere and there is no guarantee that they will not do the same here. Today they work as labourers; tomorrow Nagas will have to work for them, if we do not stand up and say no to them,’ the minister said. He was serious.

The only problem is the Centre does not share their anxieties. Nothing that binds Naga society with the rest of the country has ever been encouraged and strengthened. Natwar Thakkar started his Gandhi ashram in Mokukchang but could never expand his mission of spreading Gandhi’s sublime thoughts beyond that.

To be in Kohima is still considered a matter of fear, pregnant with life and death questions. There is no icon of India that can be seen here. In the early 1980s a Gandhi statue was installed in Kohima, only to be desecrated and destroyed soon. ‘Nagaland doesn’t need any Indian’s statue’ was the decree issued by the insurgents.

Almost everyone, from IAS officers to traders and teachers, have to cough up a part of their earnings to the insurgents. Their ‘freedom days’, ‘republic days’ are celebrated in full public view with the media from Kolkata and Delhi in attendance. Presently there is a ceasefire between the NSCN (IM) and the Indian Army, but rumours are afloat that this period has been better utilised by the insurgents to reinforce its battalions with new recruits, procure better weapons and resources to press for its demand for an ‘independent ‘Nagalim’, which seeks to ‘add’ parts of Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh to its fold.

This has enraged Manipuri and Arunachali tribals and a tribal war cannot be ruled out if the Naga insurgents’ demand is given any sympathy.

The press is lively but cocooned in its own world. “We have never been invited to join any prime minister’s party on his foreign visits, Delhi and Kolkata papers reach us very late, after a day or two, that too the dak edition,’ said Geoffrey Yaden, editor of the Nagaland Post, the main daily newspaper in the state. “They don’t understand us properly, they write to please their egos. Nobody has the time and interest to understand our people or to make serious efforts to create bridges and strengthen national feelings here. Are politicians sitting in Delhi are bothered about us or the nation?” he lamented.

I know it is very difficult to have a Delhi leader or social activist or cultural tsar to find time for a northeast visit. How many of us would go to Manipur or Nagaland or Arunachal for a family trip? Do we know that the most scintillating lakes, mountains, rivers and forests are in the northeast, bettering even Kashmir’s panorama? Unfortunately the northeast has yet to register in our minds as markedly as Hardwar, Manali, Goa  or Rameshwaram.

Corruption to the northeast’s politicians is ‘taught’ by politicians in New Delhi. Even to get a central grant released for these states, central ministers and their durbaris have to be suitably ‘pleased’. The grants that go to the northeast finally come back in large parts to the Delhi durbar through traders, contractors, commission agents and sanctioning ministers. The rest is divided amongst local ‘beneficiaries’, including the insurgents.

In view of the infiltration threat faced by Nagaland and other northeastern states, an observation by E Ramamohan, the former director general, Border Security Force, who was with me in Kohima, should be an eyeopener. He warns about the insurgent groups’ long-term planning for 2015 — “Today there are several Islamic fundamentalist insurgent groups in Assam, all created with the help of the Director General Forces Intelligence of Bangladesh and Pakistan’s Inter Services Intelligence. The main groups are the Muslim United Liberation Front of Assam, the Muslim United Tigers of Assam and the Islamic Liberation Army of Assam… what is most interesting that these Islamic fundamentalist groups have not started operations so far. Interrogations of the suspects and intelligence reports have revealed that they are in a preparation phase. Motivating and recruiting cadres, training them in Pakistan, stockpiling arms and explosives for the insurgency is their present strategy. The target is (to launch an assault) in 2015.”

Why can’t we understand that India shrinks from every inch that is occupied by Bangladeshi infiltrators in our territory? In less than 100 years India has shrunk like no other nation on earth.

We lost Taxila, Karachi, Dhaka. Post independence, we lost 1.25 lakh square kilometres of land to Pakistan and China. Beijing still eyes Arunachal Pradesh.

Then Indians lost lands and homes in the Kashmir valley and became refugees for the ‘sin’ of supporting India. Now, jihadis, Maoists and church-supported insurgents want their share. Where will this all lead to? All the power, position, money and glitter weigh nothing before the question of the nation’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. At least in the northeast, people feel nobody listens to their woes in Delhi.

Related posts:

Is Congress selling India to Pakistan?

Madrasa  = CBSE?

Threat of re-partitioning India?

National Liberation Front of Tripura

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.