The Candid Eye

August 25, 2011

World’s #9 Most Powerful Person Now Accused of Corruption — Will She Fall?

From huffingtonpost article by Cleo Paskal:

 

New Delhi. Some of India’s biggest fish are getting caught up in the country’s fast-growing wave of anti-corruption activity. In what could be India’s equivalent of a judicial jasmine revolution, previously invulnerable politicians, business icons, and pillars of the community are all nervously keeping their lawyers on speed-dial.

The anti-corruption push is an unprecedented coming together of myriad facets of Indian society. Religious leaders are concerned about the effects on morality and spiritual growth. NGOs speak of the effects on the poor. The middle class is angry about its future being stifled by a smothering blanket of day-to-day corruption. The intelligence services see corruption a clear threat to national security. And the business community, thanks to globalization, has seen how efficiently things can operate without having to constantly pay bribes or be tangled in red tape, and they want the same thing at home.

Even the Supreme Court is fed up, with Justice B. Sudarshan Reddy saying about the vast sums of Indian money being illegally hidden away in Liechtenstein Bank:

We are talking about the huge money. It is a plunder of the nation. It is a pure and simple theft of the national money. We are talking about mind-boggling crime.

The scandals are bursting on to the front pages fast and thick. Suresh Kalmadi, a Congress Party politician and the former head of the corruption-plagued Commonwealth Games, was arrested April 25. According to a report by the Indian Comptroller and Auditor General, the 2G spectrum scam alone, in which 2G licenses were sold off in a manner that was, to say the least, less than transparent, cost close to $40 billion in lost revenue.

All across India, people are saying enough is enough. And suddenly the unthinkable is starting to happen. People considered above reproach, or at least untouchable, are coming under the judicial cross-hairs. 2G alone has seen charges laid against one former government minister and several captains of industry.

And the latest high profile target is one of the biggest fish of all, Congress Party President Sonia Gandhi, currently #9 on Forbes list of the World’s Most Powerful People.

Sonia Gandhi has one of the most remarkable life stories in international politics. Born Edvige Antonia Albina Maino into a family of modest means in rural Italy, she didn’t even get a chance to complete high school before heading to the UK for work. There she met Rajiv Gandhi, son of Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. She eventually married him and the young family moved in to Indira Gandhi’s New Delhi’s home, putting her literally in the heart of Indian politics.

After Indira Gandhi’s assassination in 1984, Sonia’s husband Rajiv became Prime Minister. Following Rajiv’s 1991 assassination by Tamil terrorists, there were rumors that Sonia was going to put herself forward as Prime Minister.

As she herself later said, she “could not walk past the portraits of my husband, my mother-in-law and her father and not feel that I had some responsibility to try and save the party they had given their lives to.”

2011-04-25-SoniaCongress.jpg

Given her focus on the party, it was fitting that instead of becoming Prime Minister, she ended up as President of the powerful Congress Party. Politically, it proved to be a smart move as it gave her power without direct responsibility — while she is #9 on Forbes list of power people, the actual Prime Minister of India, Manmohan Singh, is only #18. According to Forbes, “Gandhi remains the real power behind the nuclear-tipped throne […] she has cemented her status as true heiress to the Nehru-Gandhi political dynasty.”

Her image is of a dutiful, submissive Indian wife, now widow. When her husband was alive, she would walk behind him. In public she wears saris. Although a devout Catholic, she is often photographed at Hindu Temples. And like a good Indian mother, though she has decorously pulled herself out of the race for Prime Minister, she is happy to encourage her son, Rahul, to take the job.

However there have been growing, persistent murmurs about questionable business deals and inexplicable exponential jumps in the personal wealth of her and her family.

The allegations came out in the open in 1995 when M. D. Nalapat, then Resident Editor (Delhi) of the world’s largest English language newspaper, the Times of India, began a groundbreaking series of articles about Sonia.

The articles made the controversial (at the time) claim that the public docility was just a ploy, and that Sonia actually had serious political ambitions (later confirmed by her role in Congress). Also, crucially, the series said that her desire for power wasn’t simply altruistic and that the wealth not only of her, but of her Italian relatives, rose stratospherically after Rajiv Gandhi became Prime Minister in 1984.

Nalapat’s articles could not be ignored as he was one of India’s most respected journalists and had, throughout his career, taken on corrupt politicians, social inequity and institutionalized discrimination.

This however was a ‘topic too far’. While the facts in the article were never refuted, Nalapat was forced out of journalism in 1998 and moved into academics.

Next came public questions from another highly reputed source, Sten Lindstrom, Sweden’s special prosecutor investigating the pay-offs associated with the sale of weapons by Bofors to the government of India. His investigation showed that a close friend of Sonia’s, Ottavio Quattrocchi, has received kickbacks in the millions.

In 1998 Lindstrom gave an interview in which he said:

the Gandhis, particularly now Sonia, should explain how Quattrocchi-owned companies got such fat sums as payoffs from the Bofors deal. After all, what is the connection of Sonia and the Gandhi family to Quattrocchi? Who introduced Quattrocchi and his AE Services to Bofors? At least one thing is certainly known now. A part of the payoffs definitely went to Quattrocchi. […] the papers all pointed to the Gandhi family.

Not only have the questions not been answered by Sonia, but in spite of substantial evidence against him, Quattrocchi has managed to evade prosecution in India, and has even had his kickback funds unfrozenfrom overseas accounts.

Part of the genius of Sonia Gandhi is her ability to present herself as a helpless victim, convincing even her political rivals not to fear her as she is fatally flawed. In 1998, India was being led by BJP Prime Minister Vajpayee. When Nalapat spoke with him about Sonia, he was bluntly told to lay off, as, “so long as a white Christian lady is head of the Congress Party, I [Vajpayee] and my party will always be in power”. Vajpayee and his party lost power to Sonia’s Congress in 2004.

But the most serious threat to Sonia — and, as she is at the apex of the Congress Party, and so to Congress itself — is now lying on the desk of #18, the Prime Minister of India.

On April 15, former Law and Justice Minister and Harvard Professor Dr. Subramanian Swamy asked Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for leave to lay corruption charges against Sonia Gandhi. In a meticulously researched 200+ page submission Dr Swamy alleges Sonia Gandhi has been involved in corruption in India since 1972 and personally benefited from the Bofors scam (1986), has held billions in non-Indian bank accounts since at least 1991, illegally profited from the Iraqi oil-for-food deals (2002), and even accessed KGB payoffs during the Cold War.

The Prime Minister has three months to decide whether or not to grant sanction to prosecute. If he doesn’t, Dr. Swamy can take the case directly to the Supreme Court, which under Chief Justice Kapadia is showing a definite proclivity towards facilitating corruption cases.

While, so far, the corruption cases in India have caught up some pretty big fish, if charges are laid against Sonia Gandhi, it won’t just be part of a wave, it will be a sea change.

Sonia Gandhi is not just an individual, she is the steely core of a pillar of Indian politics. If she crumbles, it will shake the foundations of the venerable Congress Party, and possibly leave a gaping hole in the political scene. Meanwhile, a range of polarizing and regional parties are ready to rush in and stake their claim. Given the growing importance of India in our heavily globalized world, this is not just an Indian story, this is one all should be following very closely indeed.

Follow Cleo Paskal on Twitter: www.twitter.com/cleopaskal

October 4, 2010

Home truths for Rahul Gandhi!

In what is clearly an indictment of PV Narasimha Rao, one of India’s greatest Prime Ministers, Congress MP Rahul Gandhi declared a couple of weeks ago that the Babri Masjid would have been saved if a member of the Nehru-Gandhi family had been in active politics at that time. Though Mr Gandhi has belatedly tried to make some amends, this incident has once again brought to the fore the feudal mindset of members of the Nehru-Gandhi family, their insecurities (which prevent them from acknowledging the contribution of leaders outside their family) and their persistent efforts to distort historical truths.

Rahul Gandhi Family - Courtesy : in.com

Since Mr Gandhi has sought to give us a glimpse of what would have been if a member of his family had been at the helm in December 1992, here is a summary of this family’s track record when it did hold the political reins. Let us begin at the beginning. Acting on the advice of Lord Mountbatten, the first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, gave Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel the task of integrating all the 565 princely states in the Indian Union. Even as Sardar Patel set about his task, Nehru, in a display of pettiness typical of this family, moved “Kashmir Affairs” from the Department of States to the Ministry of External Affairs, which was under his charge. Patel executed his responsibility in a clinical and ruthless manner and successfully completed the gigantic task of stitching together 564 princely states into the Indian Union. Nehru took on the responsibility of integrating one princely state (Jammu & Kashmir) and we all know the consequence – this has remained India’s most problematic State for the last 60 years.

But Nehru’s Kashmir blunders did not end here. In October 1947, Pakistan sent in thousands of heavily armed tribesmen into Jammu & Kashmir in a bid to capture it by force. After Maharaja Hari Singh signed the Instrument of Accession, the Indian Army marched in and began pushing back the intruders who had captured Baramulla and cut off power supply to Srinagar. Even as our gallant soldiers were driving out the intruders, Nehru cried halt to the Army operation and, much against the advice of Sardar Patel, took the fateful decision to lodge a complaint against Pakistan before the United Nations Security Council on January 1, 1948.

With this single act, Nehru demoralised the Army (which wanted just a few more days to throw out the intruders), allowed Pakistan to retain 30,000 square miles of illegally occupied territory in Jammu & Kashmir and internationalised the Kashmir issue. So, while Nehru made a mess of the Kashmir issue, Patel coaxed, cajoled or bamboozled recalcitrant princes like the Nizam of Hyderabad and a couple of pro-Pakistan princes on the Gujarat coast to fall in line and accede their territories to India. But for Patel’s firmness, we would have lost Hyderabad and the coastal areas of Gujarat to Pakistan in1948 itself and Hyderabad, in the words of the Sardar, would have become an “undigested lump” in India’s belly.

Let us now examine the report card of another member of this family – Mrs Indira Gandhi.

In 1975, Mrs Gandhi imposed an internal Emergency and turned a vibrant democracy into a dictatorship. Her Government wrecked the Constitution through a series of horrendous amendments, jailed most of her political opponents under draconian laws, ordered forcible sterilisation of men in the reproductive age group and sent bulldozers to drive out the poor from the cities. All this would never have happened if a non-Nehru-Gandhi had been the Prime Minister.

Thereafter, between 1980 and 1984, Mrs Gandhi’s Government offered tacit support to Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale just to spite the Akalis and allowed him to store deadly weapons in the Golden Temple. When things went out of control, she ordered the Army to march into the shrine, causing huge loss of human life and hurting the pride of the Sikhs. Thereafter, Mrs Gandhi was assassinated by her Sikh bodyguards leading to a pogrom in which more than 3,000 Sikhs were lynched in Delhi and other parts of northern India at the behest of Congress leaders. None of this would have happened if a non-Nehru Gandhi had been the Prime Minister between 1980 and 1984.

Coming to the era of Rajiv Gandhi, his approach to the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) eerily resembled the Sikh militancy story. This too ended in the tragic deaths of hundreds of brave, young soldiers and the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi. All this would never have happened if a non-Nehru-Gandhi had been Prime Minister between 1984 and 1989.

There are several other decisions taken by members of this family, which have resulted in much social, economic and political strife. For example, Rajiv Gandhi succumbed to pressure from the Muslim clergy and amended the law to deny maintenance to divorced Muslim women after the Shah Bano case. Thereafter he felt compelled to appease Hindu sentiment and so had the Ram Temple in Ayodhya unlocked and a ‘shilanyas’ performed. Yet, Mr Rahul Gandhi showers abuse on Narasimha Rao and expects us to believe that the family that blessed the ‘shilanyas’ would have saved the masjid! The list is endless.

However, since Mr Gandhi has sought to run down Narasimha Rao, we need to ask ourselves whether members of this family have ever had the civility to acknowledge the contribution of national leaders from outside this family, be it Sardar Patel, BR Ambedkar or Narasimha Rao. When Narasimha Rao became Prime Minister we had mortgaged gold to the Bank of England because we had run out of foreign exchange. By the time he completed his five-year term, he had laid the foundation for India’s emergence as an economic superpower. I shudder to think what would have been India’s fate if instead of the cerebral Narasimha Rao, a Nehru-Gandhi had been the Prime Minister between 1991 and 1996!

Narasimha Rao, along with Mr Manmohan Singh, not only gave India hope but also unlocked the creative genius of Indians, which had been bottled up during the era of the Nehru-Gandhis. The Nehru-Gandhis will never acknowledge this, but we do not have to be so ungrateful. Now that Mr Rahul Gandhi has sought to besmirch the image of Narasimha Rao, we must demand the appointment of a Truth Commission to document the commissions and omissions of every Prime Minister so that our post-independence history, which is currently corrupted by the mythology promoted by the Nehru-Gandhis, becomes a more honest narrative.

Source : The Pioneer

August 10, 2009

Worst case scenario threatening Indian survival

The tradition of statecraft is weak in India though most Indians are apt to name Kautilya proudly to suggest otherwise. But the proof of the pudding is in the eating and Indians have habitually stumbled in their international relations. Local Indian kingdoms in the region failed to unite adequately in the face of medieval Islamic invasions that brought them catastrophe on an unimaginable scale. Medieval Indians might be forgiven for not anticipating that Abrahamic invaders would attempt to erase their cultures altogether and enslave them en masse since local pluralist custom and consanguinity of their traditions ensured that military defeat did not mean extinction. There can be fewer excuses for subsequent failings and the affectations to superiority, combined with childish unrealism, which continued to dominate later Indian history.
The Maratha successors of the great warrior-king Shivaji were betrayed by their own French officers to the formidable Arthur Wellington, admittedly a great general who also saw off the redoubtable Napoleon. And a broken backed Pakistan continues to routinely outwit India today. Fundamentally, Indians refuse to acknowledge the brutally predatory nature of the wider world and persistently adopt the path of least resistance in the apparent hope that difficult problems will go away or can be finessed by compromises.
The Gandhi-Nehru era is considered by many to have been the most dismaying modern example of boundless self-confidence and stupidity in dealings with other countries. In defence of the Mahatma it might be said that his supposed whimsical counsel to surrender and/or commit mass suicide, which is what he advised the Bengali Hindu rape victims of Noakhali, may not be the entire story. Although he reputedly espoused non violence, almost unconditionally, the same Mahatma Gandhi also wrote in The Doctrine of the Sword, “I do believe when there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I would rather have India resort to arms in order to defend her honour than that she should in a cowardly manner become or remain a helpless victim to her own dishonour”. When Nehru apologetically informed him of India’s armed defence of Kashmir against Pakistani marauders, engaged in rape and looting, he agreed that there was no choice, but to fight. But Gandhi’s theme of non-violence was handsomely embellished by India’s Anglo-Saxon enemies as a means of befuddling the natives though some among them had their own reasons for choosing befuddlement. Jawaharlal Nehru, though a worldly statesman was another kettle of fish, wildly misconceiving Indian interests at every juncture, choosing the worst possible advisers and ignoring counsel that warned of impending national disaster. Ambassador K. M Pannikar, his evil courtier, led him up the garden path while Nehru banished the formidable Mr. Sinha abroad because the latter insisted on warning of the impending 1962 Chinese attack.
Even Indira Gandhi, who displayed great courage, was failed by a medley of dim-witted advisers, apt to misconstrue their privileged origins as some sort of certification of innate wisdom. And if they could use a knife and fork, unlike the rest of their hapless fellow countrymen and compose adolescent English prose, they were unstoppable. This was the reason why she took the decision to invade Bangladesh without the enthusiastic support of those around her. But she was lucky to have, in General JFR Jacob, one of the great soldiers of the twentieth century and that according to the Times of London, which unfailingly wishes India harm. The fruits of the historic victory were lost because India declined to offend the USSR since it provided critical diplomatic support for its famous military victory. The Soviet leadership pressed India not to demand from Pakistan what might be considered humiliating terms because the US made that a condition for the SALT talks between them scheduled for 1972, which the USSR regarded as crucial. Quite clearly, India should have insisted on a treaty renouncing all Pakistani claims to Indian Territory before agreeing to the cessation of hostilities, even if it offended the USSR. The expression of gratitude in international relations is situational and should be withheld if its does not serve important national interests. It is not the counterpart of an inter-personal relationship that encapsulates inviolable mutual honour!
The most immediate danger for India is a simultaneous military attack by Pakistan and China. Despite apparent Indian military preparedness for such a dire eventuality it is unclear if India could sustain a prolonged engagement with both of them. China is in a position to produce sufficient hardware and ordnance for its own and Pakistan’s military assault against India. India is unfortunately likely to remain dependant on foreign supplies of hardware and possibly ordnance as well for the foreseeable future if the engagement proves long-lasting. Of course the threat of a nuclear factor should enter into the calculations of both aggressors, but India has done everything to convey a message that it is unlikely to resort to nuclear weapons, even in the face of military and political catastrophe. It may be assumed that Russia will not deny India supplies and spares, but there is a high probability that it will press for Indian concessions to keep its own fragile relationship with an increasingly empowered China tolerable. The Israelis are not in a position to substitute Russia and are unlikely to be enthusiastic about enmity with China by helping India. The Americans will do exactly the same, judging Indian territorial losses and humiliation an insufficient cause to jeopardise its historic friendship with Pakistan and offend China, with which it is evidently fashioning a global condominium. On the contrary, India in disarray in the aftermath of defeat might be considered ripe for subordination as a prostrate ally like Pakistan and rapid Christianization.
Indians enamoured of the US are likely to be grievously disappointed when their supposed friendship is tested by the harsh realities of international diplomacy. The US faces no direct threat from China while its ICBMs retain their awesome superiority in variety, accuracy and numbers. While India and Japan may be seen as useful counterweights, in order to elicit an acceptable understanding with China over their respective interests in Asia and elsewhere, actual conflict with it would be considered a failure of US policy. The loss of some Indian territories to China and Pakistan, being ardently sought by both in a war against India, might be regarded as unfortunate, but clearly not a casus belli that should bring it into direct conflict with either aggressor. The obverse does not hold true in the event of the US finding itself in a serious military engagement with China, arising out of an unavoidable dispute with it. In such a situation, Indian bases would be sought and Indians regarded as useful cannon fodder to ensure a satisfactory outcome for the US. There are some within the supposed Indian nationalist constituency that might even be willing to acquiesce in such an unfavourable role for India because they have compromised themselves with the US and are vulnerable to blackmail.
In addition, India’s minor detractors in the region might regard setback suffered by it an opportunity for achieving any territorial ambitions they may have harboured. The enmity of its smaller neighbours stems mainly from a lack of respect for India, which means that although India is pilloried by them as an alleged bully it is precisely because India does not wield a big stick that they complain and needle. Of late there has been a measure of attitudinal change in this motley group of failed states because Indian economic advance, though irksome to them, cannot be altogether denied. In addition, the Cold War incitement against India fuelled by the Anglo-American imperial predators has waned somewhat in the past decade. But India should be under no illusion that if it were to find itself in serious political difficulties they would wish to take advantage with alacrity. India must therefore make provision for this potentially costly eventuality in much the way the USSR did before the onset of war with Nazi Germany in relation to the truculent Finns and Baltic States to secure its strategic perimeter. Such preparations would entail sealing the border with Bangladesh and Nepal and securing the Palk Straits to prevent its use by a third party, aided by Sri Lankan perfidy. In all these cases the threat of devastating Indian fire power should suffice to deter opportunism.
A more complex and disastrous problem lurks inside India itself in the potentially treasonous conduct of Indians themselves and a foreign fifth column embedded discreetly within it. Many of the thousands of foreigners residing legally and illegally in India, including ostensibly accredited journalists and apparently innocuous visitors, are almost certainly agents of foreign powers who will implement pre-existing plans to undertake political and military sabotage. Assorted insurgencies, ranging from ULFA to the Naxalites, are completely controlled by Sino-Pak agencies and will no doubt endeavour to tie down India’s paramilitary forces. It would be a logical goal for them to seize territory and especially small towns, even cities and decapitate the established authority within it. If the military debacle suffered by India is severe whole swathes of Muslim India within its cities, which already enjoy virtual de facto sovereign autonomy, will revolt to assert de jure independence. The Hindus in these cities, especially Kolkata, Hyderabad and other areas adjacent to its borders in Assam, Kashmir and elsewhere will simply flee, precipitating a further effective partition of India. Depending on the scale of the catastrophe, some states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Punjab and J&K and indeed even West Bengal, which have already been subverted politically by foreign interests like evangelical business corporations, could secede and are likely gain immediate political recognition from India’s enemies.
If India’s feeble political leadership showed any sign of deploying nuclear weapons in order to deter Chinese aggression massive public demonstrations, instigated by Left parties and myriad foreign-sponsored NGO activists are guaranteed to oppose it. It may also be hazarded that weak coalition partners at the federal centre, inexperienced and motivated principally by lucre would panic and fold quickly if India’s armed forces suffered a major reverse or local revolts threatened the viability of their own regional party. Most of the leaders of such coalition partners are preoccupied with the personal fortunes of their families and party and their very participation at the federal centre is primarily intended to promote their parochial regional aspirations. India may face the threat of extinction as a political entity if matters get out of hand, but its opinionated Chatterati will no doubt congregate in the capitals salons in the meantime to reflect on the IPL and other assorted matters of substance. The armed forces alone would remain interposed between annihilation and Indian survival. By the time such dire choices are posed, though unlikely, but not inconceivable, it would be too late to work out a strategy in response to them. It is therefore indispensable for India’s armed forces and what remains of its dismayingly politicised and subverted establishment (including its bureaucracy, intelligence services and key players within civil society) to consider what actions they may need to take in the event of a primordial threat to India’s survival.
Seizure of political power by India’s armed forces in such circumstances would be imperative and justified. It would be need to be followed by ruthlessly neutralising saboteurs and foreign agents operating inside the country. The same treatment would have to be meted out to a significant number of the comprador political class under the sway of foreign powers and those groups threatening secession. In order for this to be achieved effectively plans need to be drawn up in advance, covertly, with the help of India’s intelligence agencies, to identify individual candidates for elimination. But the gathering of this information needs to proceed in the greatest secrecy, involving the fewest possible senior personnel of the armed forces and only on a need-to-know basis. Perhaps, this particular task might be best left to retired senior personnel of the agencies concerned. Revolts within cities would need to be crushed immediately and pitilessly to demonstrate the will of the Indian State. A few harsh examples would constitute a salutary deterrent. But most of all, the Indian armed forces would need to wrest control of India’s nuclear weapons from the political class. And with the help of India’s formidable scientific establishment prepare low-yield battlefield nuclear warheads for use, with the menace of escalation to a ballistic level if India is threatened by the nuclear armouries of its adversaries.

The tradition of statecraft is weak in India though most Indians are apt to name Kautilya proudly to suggest otherwise. But the proof of the pudding is in the eating and Indians have habitually stumbled in their international relations. Local Indian kingdoms in the region failed to unite adequately in the face of medieval Islamic invasions that brought them catastrophe on an unimaginable scale. Medieval Indians might be forgiven for not anticipating that Abrahamic invaders would attempt to erase their cultures altogether and enslave them en masse since local pluralist custom and consanguinity of their traditions ensured that military defeat did not mean extinction. There can be fewer excuses for subsequent failings and the affectations to superiority, combined with childish unrealism, which continued to dominate later Indian history.

The Maratha successors of the great warrior-king Shivaji were betrayed by their own French officers to the formidable Arthur Wellington, admittedly a great general who also saw off the redoubtable Napoleon. And a broken backed Pakistan continues to routinely outwit India today. Fundamentally, Indians refuse to acknowledge the brutally predatory nature of the wider world and persistently adopt the path of least resistance in the apparent hope that difficult problems will go away or can be finessed by compromises.

The Gandhi-Nehru era is considered by many to have been the most dismaying modern example of boundless self-confidence and stupidity in dealings with other countries. In defence of the Mahatma it might be said that his supposed whimsical counsel to surrender and/or commit mass suicide, which is what he advised the Bengali Hindu rape victims of Noakhali, may not be the entire story. Although he reputedly espoused non violence, almost unconditionally, the same Mahatma Gandhi also wrote in The Doctrine of the Sword, “I do believe when there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I would rather have India resort to arms in order to defend her honour than that she should in a cowardly manner become or remain a helpless victim to her own dishonour”. When Nehru apologetically informed him of India’s armed defence of Kashmir against Pakistani marauders, engaged in rape and looting, he agreed that there was no choice, but to fight. But Gandhi’s theme of non-violence was handsomely embellished by India’s Anglo-Saxon enemies as a means of befuddling the natives though some among them had their own reasons for choosing befuddlement. Jawaharlal Nehru, though a worldly statesman was another kettle of fish, wildly misconceiving Indian interests at every juncture, choosing the worst possible advisers and ignoring counsel that warned of impending national disaster. Ambassador K. M Pannikar, his evil courtier, led him up the garden path while Nehru banished the formidable Mr. Sinha abroad because the latter insisted on warning of the impending 1962 Chinese attack.

Even Indira Gandhi, who displayed great courage, was failed by a medley of dim-witted advisers, apt to misconstrue their privileged origins as some sort of certification of innate wisdom. And if they could use a knife and fork, unlike the rest of their hapless fellow countrymen and compose adolescent English prose, they were unstoppable. This was the reason why she took the decision to invade Bangladesh without the enthusiastic support of those around her. But she was lucky to have, in General JFR Jacob, one of the great soldiers of the twentieth century and that according to the Times of London, which unfailingly wishes India harm. The fruits of the historic victory were lost because India declined to offend the USSR since it provided critical diplomatic support for its famous military victory. The Soviet leadership pressed India not to demand from Pakistan what might be considered humiliating terms because the US made that a condition for the SALT talks between them scheduled for 1972, which the USSR regarded as crucial. Quite clearly, India should have insisted on a treaty renouncing all Pakistani claims to Indian Territory before agreeing to the cessation of hostilities, even if it offended the USSR. The expression of gratitude in international relations is situational and should be withheld if its does not serve important national interests. It is not the counterpart of an inter-personal relationship that encapsulates inviolable mutual honour!

The most immediate danger for India is a simultaneous military attack by Pakistan and China. Despite apparent Indian military preparedness for such a dire eventuality it is unclear if India could sustain a prolonged engagement with both of them. China is in a position to produce sufficient hardware and ordnance for its own and Pakistan’s military assault against India. India is unfortunately likely to remain dependant on foreign supplies of hardware and possibly ordnance as well for the foreseeable future if the engagement proves long-lasting. Of course the threat of a nuclear factor should enter into the calculations of both aggressors, but India has done everything to convey a message that it is unlikely to resort to nuclear weapons, even in the face of military and political catastrophe. It may be assumed that Russia will not deny India supplies and spares, but there is a high probability that it will press for Indian concessions to keep its own fragile relationship with an increasingly empowered China tolerable. The Israelis are not in a position to substitute Russia and are unlikely to be enthusiastic about enmity with China by helping India. The Americans will do exactly the same, judging Indian territorial losses and humiliation an insufficient cause to jeopardise its historic friendship with Pakistan and offend China, with which it is evidently fashioning a global condominium. On the contrary, India in disarray in the aftermath of defeat might be considered ripe for subordination as a prostrate ally like Pakistan and rapid Christianization.

Indians enamoured of the US are likely to be grievously disappointed when their supposed friendship is tested by the harsh realities of international diplomacy. The US faces no direct threat from China while its ICBMs retain their awesome superiority in variety, accuracy and numbers. While India and Japan may be seen as useful counterweights, in order to elicit an acceptable understanding with China over their respective interests in Asia and elsewhere, actual conflict with it would be considered a failure of US policy. The loss of some Indian territories to China and Pakistan, being ardently sought by both in a war against India, might be regarded as unfortunate, but clearly not a casus belli that should bring it into direct conflict with either aggressor. The obverse does not hold true in the event of the US finding itself in a serious military engagement with China, arising out of an unavoidable dispute with it. In such a situation, Indian bases would be sought and Indians regarded as useful cannon fodder to ensure a satisfactory outcome for the US. There are some within the supposed Indian nationalist constituency that might even be willing to acquiesce in such an unfavourable role for India because they have compromised themselves with the US and are vulnerable to blackmail.

In addition, India’s minor detractors in the region might regard setback suffered by it an opportunity for achieving any territorial ambitions they may have harboured. The enmity of its smaller neighbours stems mainly from a lack of respect for India, which means that although India is pilloried by them as an alleged bully it is precisely because India does not wield a big stick that they complain and needle. Of late there has been a measure of attitudinal change in this motley group of failed states because Indian economic advance, though irksome to them, cannot be altogether denied. In addition, the Cold War incitement against India fuelled by the Anglo-American imperial predators has waned somewhat in the past decade. But India should be under no illusion that if it were to find itself in serious political difficulties they would wish to take advantage with alacrity. India must therefore make provision for this potentially costly eventuality in much the way the USSR did before the onset of war with Nazi Germany in relation to the truculent Finns and Baltic States to secure its strategic perimeter. Such preparations would entail sealing the border with Bangladesh and Nepal and securing the Palk Straits to prevent its use by a third party, aided by Sri Lankan perfidy. In all these cases the threat of devastating Indian fire power should suffice to deter opportunism.

A more complex and disastrous problem lurks inside India itself in the potentially treasonous conduct of Indians themselves and a foreign fifth column embedded discreetly within it. Many of the thousands of foreigners residing legally and illegally in India, including ostensibly accredited journalists and apparently innocuous visitors, are almost certainly agents of foreign powers who will implement pre-existing plans to undertake political and military sabotage. Assorted insurgencies, ranging from ULFA to the Naxalites, are completely controlled by Sino-Pak agencies and will no doubt endeavour to tie down India’s paramilitary forces. It would be a logical goal for them to seize territory and especially small towns, even cities and decapitate the established authority within it. If the military debacle suffered by India is severe whole swathes of Muslim India within its cities, which already enjoy virtual de facto sovereign autonomy, will revolt to assert de jure independence. The Hindus in these cities, especially Kolkata, Hyderabad and other areas adjacent to its borders in Assam, Kashmir and elsewhere will simply flee, precipitating a further effective partition of India. Depending on the scale of the catastrophe, some states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Punjab and J&K and indeed even West Bengal, which have already been subverted politically by foreign interests like evangelical business corporations, could secede and are likely gain immediate political recognition from India’s enemies.

If India’s feeble political leadership showed any sign of deploying nuclear weapons in order to deter Chinese aggression massive public demonstrations, instigated by Left parties and myriad foreign-sponsored NGO activists are guaranteed to oppose it. It may also be hazarded that weak coalition partners at the federal centre, inexperienced and motivated principally by lucre would panic and fold quickly if India’s armed forces suffered a major reverse or local revolts threatened the viability of their own regional party. Most of the leaders of such coalition partners are preoccupied with the personal fortunes of their families and party and their very participation at the federal centre is primarily intended to promote their parochial regional aspirations. India may face the threat of extinction as a political entity if matters get out of hand, but its opinionated Chatterati will no doubt congregate in the capitals salons in the meantime to reflect on the IPL and other assorted matters of substance. The armed forces alone would remain interposed between annihilation and Indian survival. By the time such dire choices are posed, though unlikely, but not inconceivable, it would be too late to work out a strategy in response to them. It is therefore indispensable for India’s armed forces and what remains of its dismayingly politicised and subverted establishment (including its bureaucracy, intelligence services and key players within civil society) to consider what actions they may need to take in the event of a primordial threat to India’s survival.

Seizure of political power by India’s armed forces in such circumstances would be imperative and justified. It would be need to be followed by ruthlessly neutralising saboteurs and foreign agents operating inside the country. The same treatment would have to be meted out to a significant number of the comprador political class under the sway of foreign powers and those groups threatening secession. In order for this to be achieved effectively plans need to be drawn up in advance, covertly, with the help of India’s intelligence agencies, to identify individual candidates for elimination. But the gathering of this information needs to proceed in the greatest secrecy, involving the fewest possible senior personnel of the armed forces and only on a need-to-know basis. Perhaps, this particular task might be best left to retired senior personnel of the agencies concerned. Revolts within cities would need to be crushed immediately and pitilessly to demonstrate the will of the Indian State. A few harsh examples would constitute a salutary deterrent. But most of all, the Indian armed forces would need to wrest control of India’s nuclear weapons from the political class. And with the help of India’s formidable scientific establishment prepare low-yield battlefield nuclear warheads for use, with the menace of escalation to a ballistic level if India is threatened by the nuclear armouries of its adversaries.

Source : Vigil Online

August 5, 2009

Bangladesh, a portrait of convert genocide – 1

Background

All kinds of people of the erstwhile East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) irrespective of caste, creed, religion or sex stood up conjointly from the inception of exploitation and oppression of the self-seeking ruling class of Pakistan which was established on the basis of the Two Nation Theory. The very harmful effect of the so-called Two Nation Theory was-division, disunity, malice, communalism and fanaticism. Bengali nationalism slowly and rapidly emerged against this reactionary stream. From the historic language movement of 1952 till the war of liberation of 1971 the united struggle of Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists and Christian gave rise to the unconquerable ideal of Bengal nationalism and ultimately out of the sacrifice of the lives of the 3 million people, Independent Sovereign Bangladesh was born. The basic consciousness of the liberation struggle manifested itself in the four fundamental principals of the state, namely, Nationalism, Secularism, Democracy and Socialism as laid down in the Constitution of 1972. The entire nation came to realise through the liberation struggle that is only the secular Bengali nationalism which could establish the national unity by binding the different religious communities with the bond of fraternity. Through the vicissitudes of the history, the reactionary clique comprising the anti-liberation forces has captured the state power and destroyed the ideals of the War of Liberation, the four state principles. Not only that, the communal, fanatic and fundamentalist forces, who were defeated and rejected in the liberation war, have been rehabilitated.
At last the ruling class of 1988 has illegally and unconstitutionally made ‘Islam’ the state religion by enacting the so-called 8th Amendment of the Constitution with a view to perpetuating its autocratic rule by using religion as a political weapon just like the Pakistan regime. By means of this sort of divisive activities, vicious move has been made to destroy the secular-Bengali nationalism, the basis of the Independent and Sovereign Bangladesh and also the various rights and the very existence of the religious minorities have jeopardised. The 20 percent people of the country, that is, two and a half crores of religious minorities have been driven towards an uncertain future. In all spheres of life including job opportunities, the religious minorities are facing intense discrimination and great deprivation. The tribal people have been deprived of their legitimate rights. As a result, all of them have been subjected to great sufferings leading to complete frustration in life.
On the other hand, under the cover of the 8th Amendment of the Constitution the communal, fanatic and the fundamentalist forces and the anti-social elements have created a chaotic situation in the different parts of the country by inflicting various kinds of oppression and torture upon the members of the minority communities, such as, snatching away their landed properties on the false plea of enemies (vested) property or by creating forged and fraudulent deeds, or setting fire to their houses or giving them threats for leaving the country. In different areas of the country inhabited by the minorities in substantial number, innumerable people have become the victim of harassment and thereby they have become very panicky.
It is, however, a matter of hope that the heroic Bengali nation, as in the past is again building up resistance against communalism, fundamentalism, fanaticism, oppression and tyranny. The intelligentsia as well as the conscious citizens of all classes of the entire country have already given a call to launch an united movement of active resistance against this anti-nation step of the autocratic Government.
FACT India has put up an exhibition on the  genocide of minorities in Bangladesh.

Political changes, Becoming of a Muslim Nation and Decrease in population of minorities:-

0102

To be continued.

July 27, 2009

Government Schemes and Projects named after Nehru-Gandhi family

Filed under: Congress,Indira Gandhi,Rahul Gandhi — thecandideye @ 6:00 AM
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My friend arrived at Indira Gandhi International Airport,New Delhi last week, after finishing his research in Cambridge University under Cambridge Nehru scholarship. Recently he had come to Rajiv Gandhi university in Bangalore.He wanted to meet me in Indira Gandhi musical Fountains festival.I inquired about his new job in Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi….This is the kind of penetration,Nehru-Gandhi family has done to our lives.

Nehru-Gandhi family

Nehru-Gandhi family

Since 1947,the Nehru family has been using people’s money to market and promote their party and themselves.Though we got independence from Britishers to think and act freely,this one family has been doing all it can to influence the gullible people and their thinking and decisions.What is so interesting is,they do this in a systematic manner without much publicity.These clandestine acts of this family is getting them people’s support and sympathy without any real effort from their side.I came across these interesting details of A.Suryaprakash about the government projects and Nehru-Gandhi family’s association with those.These thousands of schemes have miserably failed to eradicate poverty among people.They have neither provided safe drinking water for all Indians nor guarded people from external/internal terrorist/maoist threats.

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – 91.88 crore.
Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – 91.52 crore
4. Rajiv Gandhi Udyami Mitra Yojana for benefit of NE entrepreneurs, Ministry of Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, Government of India,
Budgetary allocation 2008-9 – Rs. 2.70 crore
Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – Rs.1.12 crore
5. Indira Awas Yojana, Ministry of Rural Areas and Environment – IAY is a CSS funded on cost-sharing basis between the Centre and the States in the ratio of 75:25. In the case of UTs, the entire funds are provided by Centre. The target groups for housing under IAY are households below poverty line living in rural areas, particularly those belonging to SC/ST and freed bonded labourers.
Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – Rs. 7919.00 crores
Budgetary allocation  2009-10 – Rs.7914.70 crores
6. Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme – objective to provide social security to workers in the unorganized sector in a phased manner. Budgetary allocation in 2008-09 is Rs. 3,443 crore
7. Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission, Ministry of Urban Development,
Govt. of India – 7 years time frame, 50,000 cr.
Budgetary allocation for 2008 – 9 – 10447.98 crore
Budgetary allocation for 2009-10 – 10713.84 crore
8. Jawaharlal Nehru Rojgar Yojna – Ministry of Labour and Employment – A Self- employment programme for urban poor
9. Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Kalyan Yojna, Employees’ State Insurance Corporation
10. Indira Gandhi Canal Project, Funded by World Bank
11. Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojana, Union Ministry of Textiles, in
association with ICICI Lombard General Insurance Company Limited
12. Indira Vikas Patra
State Government Schemes
1. Rajiv Gandhi Rehabilitation Package for Tsunami Affected Areas, Govt. of Tamil Nadu, Budgetary Allocation Rs.2347.19 crores
2. Rajiv Gandhi Social Security Scheme for poor people, Department of Revenue and Disaster Management, Govt. of Puducherry
3. Rajiv Ratna Awas Yojna – Congress party president and United Progressive Alliance (UPA) Chairperson Sonia Gandhi had announced that the Centre would give a package of Rs.1,500-crore for providing housing facilities to the poorer sections in Delhi, thus announcing the scheme.
4. Rajiv Gandhi Prathamik Shiksha Mission , Raigarh
5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Madhya Pradesh
6. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Food Security , Madhya Pradesh
7. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh
8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited is a Government Company established by the Government of Karnataka to cater to the housing needs of the Economically and Socially weaker sections of the society.  Registered in April 2000, its authorised Capital is Rs.10 crores with Rs.3 crore  paid up.
9. Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Development Mission, Rajasthan
10. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Literacy Programme, Assam
11. Rajiv Gandhi Swavlamban Rojgar Yojana, Govt. of NCT of Delhi
12. Rajiv Gandhi Mobile Aids Counseling and Testing Services, Rajiv Gandhi Foundation
13. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyarthi Suraksha Yojana, Maharashtra
14. Rajiv Gandhi Mission for Water Shed Management, M.P.
15. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission for Tribal Areas, MP
16. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry
17. Rajiv Gandhi Breakfast Scheme, Pondicherry
18. Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Divas, Punjab
19. Rajiv Gandhi Artisans Health and Life Insurance Scheme, Tamil Nadu
20. Rajiv Gandhi Zopadpatti and Nivara Prakalpa, Mumbai
21. Rajiv Arogya Sri programme , Gujrat State Govt. Scheme
22. Rajiv Gandhi Abhyudaya Yojana, AP
23. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Saksharta Mission, Jabalpur
24. Rajiv Gandhi Bridges and Roads Infrastructure Development Programme for the construction of new roads and bridges and strengthening of the existing ones in the state of Haryana
25. Rajiv Gandhi Gramin Niwara Prakalp, Maharashtra Govt.
26. Indira Gandhi Utkrishtha Chhattervritti Yojna for Post Plus Two Students, Himachal Pradesh Government Scheme, Sponsored by, Central Government
27. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme, Maharashtra Govt.
28. Indira Gandhi Prathisthan, Housing and Urban Planning Department, UP Govt
29. Indira Kranthi Patham Scheme, Andhra Pradesh
30. Indira Gandhi Nahar Pariyojana, State Govt. Scheme
31. Indira Gandhi Vruddha Bhumiheen Shetmajoor Anudan Yojana, Govt. of
Maharashtra
32. Indira Gandhi Nahar Project  (IGNP), Jaisalmer, Govt. of Rajasthan
33. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Yojna, Govt. of Maharashtra
34. Indira Gandhi kuppam, State Govt. Welfare Scheme for Tsunami effected
fishermen
35. Indira Gandhi Drinking Water Scheme-2006, Haryana Govt.
36. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Old, Landless, Destitute women farm labour Scheme,
Maharashtra Govt.
37. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme , Maharashtra Govt.
38. Indira Gaon Ganga Yojana, Chattisgarh
39. Indira Sahara Yojana , Chattisgarh
40. Indira Soochna Shakti Yojana, Chattisgarh
41. Indira Gandhi Balika Suraksha Yojana , HP
42. Indira Gandhi Garibi Hatao Yojana (DPIP), MP
43. Indira Gandhi super thermal power project , Haryana Govt.
44. Indira Gandhi Water Project, Haryana Govt.
45. Indira Gandhi Sagar Project , Bhandara District Gosikhurd Maharashtra
46. Indira Jeevitha Bima Pathakam, AP Govt
47. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshani Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.
48. Indira Mahila Yojana Scheme, Meghalaya Govt
49. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, Chhattisgarh Govt.
50. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.
51. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, The government of Andhra Pradesh helped most of the respondent families in acquiring female calves through this scheme.
52. Indira Gandhi Landless Agriculture Labour scheme, Maharashtra Govt.
Sports/Tournaments/Trophies
1. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup Kabaddi Tournament
2. Rajiv Gandhi Sadbhavana Run
3. Rajiv Gandhi Federation Cup boxing championship
4. Rajiv Gandhi International tournament (football)
5. NSCI – Rajiv Gandhi road races, New Delhi
6. Rajiv Gandhi Boat Race, Kerala
7. Rajiv Gandhi International Artistic Gymnastic Tournament
8. Rajiv Gandhi Kabbadi Meet
9. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Roller Skating Championship
10. Rajiv Gandhi memorial marathon race, New Delhi
11. Rajiv Gandhi International Judo Championship, Chandigarh
12. Rajeev Gandhi Memorial Trophy for the Best College, Calicut
13. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Cricket Tournament, Initiated by Rahul Gandhi in Amethi
14. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup (U-21), football
15. Rajiv Gandhi Trophy (football)
16.    Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Sportspersons
17.   All Indira Rajiv Gandhi Basketball (Girls) Tournament, organized by Delhi
State
18. All India Rajiv Gandhi Wrestling Gold Cup, organized by Delhi State
19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Jhopadpatti Football Tournament, Rajura
20. Rajiv Gandhi International Invitation Gold Cup Football Tournament, Jamshedpur
21. Rajiv Gandhi Mini Olympics, Mumbai
22. Rajiv Gandhi Beachball Kabaddi Federation
23. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Trophy Prerana Foundation
24. International Indira Gandhi Gold Cup Tournament
25. Indira Gandhi International Hockey Tournament
26. Indira Gandhi Boat Race
27. Jawaharlal Nehru International Gold Cup Football Tournament.
28. Jawaharlal Nehru Hockey Tournament.
Stadia
1. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Delhi
2. Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium, New Delhi
3. Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, New Delhi
4. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Stadium, Bawana
5. Rajiv Gandhi National Football Academy, Haryana
6. Rajiv Gandhi AC Stadium, Vishakhapatnam
7. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Pondicherry
8. Rajiv Gandhi Stadium, Nahariagun, Itanagar
9. Rajiv Gandhi Badminton Indoor Stadium, Cochin
10. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Kadavanthra,Ernakulam
11. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Complex , Singhu
12. Rajib Gandhi Memorial Sports Complex, Guwahati
13. Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad
14. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Cochin
15. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh
16. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Una, Himachal Pradesh
17. Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Vishakhapatnam
18. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Deogarh, Rajasthan
19. Gandhi Stadium, Bolangir, Orissa
Airports/ Ports
1. Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, New Hyderabad, A.P.
2. Rajiv Gandhi Container Terminal, Cochin
3. Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi
4. Indira Gandhi Dock, Mumbai
5. Jawaharlal Nehru Nava Sheva Port Trust, Mumbai
Total budgetary plan outlay 2008-9  – 69.92crore
Total budgetary plan outlay 2009-10 – 324 crore
Universities/Education Institutes
1. Rajiv Gandhi Indian Institute of Management, Shilong
2. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Ranchi, Jharkhand
3. Rajiv Gandhi Technical University, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.
4. Rajiv Gandhi School of Intellectual Property Law, Kharagpur, Kolkata
5. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Secundrabad
6. Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law, Patiala, Punjab
7. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu
Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports
Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 1.50 crore
Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 3.00 crore
8. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Begumpet, Hyderabad, A.P
9. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam, Kerala
10. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering Research & Technology, Chandrapur, Maharashtra
11. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Airoli, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra
12. Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh
13. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Chola Nagar, Bangalore, Karnataka
14. Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.
15. Rajiv Gandhi D.e.d. College, Latur, Maharashtra
16. Rajiv Gandhi College, Shahpura, Bhopal
17. Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies, New Delhi
18. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Raebareli, U.P.
19. Rajiv Gandhi Homeopathic Medical College, Bhopal, M.P.
20. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Post Graduate Studies, East Godavari District, A.P.
21. Rajiv Gandhi College of Education, Thumkur, Karnataka
22. Rajiv Gandhi College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu
23. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of IT and Biotechnology, Bhartiya Vidhyapeeth
24. Rajiv Gandhi High School, Mumbai, Maharashtra
25. Rajiv Gandhi Group of Institutions, Satna, M.P.
26. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur, Tamil Nadu
27. Rajiv Gandhi Biotechnology Centre, R.T.M., Nagpur University
28. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
29. Rajiv Gandhi Mahavidyalaya, Madhya Pradesh
30. Rajiv Gandhi Post Graduate College, Allahabad, U.P.
31. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka
32. Rajiv Gandhi Govt. PG Ayurvedic College, Poprola, Himachal Pradesh
33. Rajiv Gandhi College, Satna, M.P.
34. Rajiv Gandhi Academy for Aviation Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
35. Rajiv Gandhi Madhyamic Vidyalaya, Maharashtra
36. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Contemporary Studies, Islamabad, Pakistan
37. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship
38. Rajiv Gandhi Industrial Training Centre, Gandhinagar
39. Rajiv Gandhi University of Knowledge Technologies, Andhra Pradesh
40. Rajiv Gandhi Institute Of Distance Education, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
41. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture , Tamil Nadu
42. Rajiv Gandhi University (Arunachal University), A.P.
43. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Medicine Centre (RGSMC), Kerela
44. Rajiv Gandhi Science Centre, Mauritus
45. Rajiv Gandhi Kala Mandir, Ponda, Goa
46. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyalaya, Mulund, Mumbai
47. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Polytechnic, Bangalore, Karnataka
48. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Circle Telecom Training Centre (India), Chennai
49. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Kasagod, Kerala
50. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College Of Aeronautics, Jaipur
51. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial First Grade College, Shimoga
52. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College of Education, Jammu & Kashmir
53. Rajiv Gandhi South Campus, Barkacha, Varanasi
54. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Teacher’s Training College, Jharkhand
55. Rajiv Gandhi Degree College, Rajahmundry, A.P.
56. Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), New Delhi
57. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development & Research, Mumbai, Maharashtra
58. Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy, Dehradun
59. Indira Gandhi RashtriyaUran Akademi, Fursatganj Airfield, Rae Bareli, Uttar Pradesh
60. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai
61. Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Orissa
62. Indira Gandhi B.Ed. College, Mangalore
63. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Education, Nanded, Maharashtra
64. Indira Gandhi Balika Niketan B.ED. College, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan
65. Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur, Madhya Pradesh
66. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Engineering, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra
67. Smt. Indira Gandhi Colelge, Tiruchirappalli
68. Indira Gandhi Engineering College, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh
69. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kashmere Gate, Delhi
70. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Sarang, Dist. Dhenkanal, Orissa
71. Indira Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Pune, Maharashtra
72. Indira Gandhi Integral Education Centre, New Delhi
73. Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, Delhi University, Delhi
74. Indira Gandhi High School, Himachal
75. Indira Kala Sangit Vishwavidyalaya, Chhattisgarh
76. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
77. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Andhra Pradesh
78. Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, Uttarakashi
79. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Business Management, Vikram University
80. Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
81. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore
82. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, AP
83. Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra
84. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced Scientific Research, a deemed university, Jakkur, P.O. Bangalore
85. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Social Studies, affiliated to Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapith (Pune, Maharashtra)
86. Jawaharlal Nehru College of Aeronautics & Applied Sciences, Coimbatore, (ESTD 1968)
87. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Katraj, Dhankwdi, Pune, Maharashtra
88. Kamal Kishore Kadam’s Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra
89. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Education & Technological Research, Nanded, Maharashra
90. Jawaharlal Nehru College, Aligarh
91. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad
92. Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Jabalpur
93. Jawaharlal Nehru B.Ed. College, Kota, Rajasthan
94. Jawaharlal Nehru P.G. College, Bhopal
95. Jawaharlal Nehru Government Engineering College, Sundernagar, District Mandi, H.P.
96. Jawaharlal Nehru PublicSchool, Kolar Road, Bhopal
97. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kakinada, A.P.
98. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Ibrahimpatti, Andhra Pradesh
Awards
1.   Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Achievement
2.   Rajiv Gandhi Shiromani Award
3.   Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Awards, Delhi Labour Welfare Board
4.   Rajiv Gandhi National Sadbhavana Award
5.   Rajiv Gandhi Manav Seva Award
6.   Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Conservation Award
7.   Rajiv Gandhi National Award Scheme for Original Book Writing
on Gyan Vigyan
8.   Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award
9.   Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award, Instituted by Bureau of
Indian Standards in 1991
10.   Rajiv Gandhi Environment Award for Clean Technology, Ministry
of Environment & Forest, Govt. of India
11.   RajivGandhi Travelling Scholarship
12.   Rajiv Gandhi(UK) Foundation Scholarship
13.   Rajiv Gandhi Film Awards (Mumbai)
14.   Rajiv Gandhi Khelratna Puraskar
15.   Rajiv Gandhi Parisara Prashasti, Karnataka
16.   RajivGandhi Vocational Excellence Awards
17.   Rajiv Gandhi Excellence award
18.   Indira Gandhi Peace Prize
19.   Indira Gandhi Prize for National Integration
20.   Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Award
21.   Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Awards, Ministry of
Environment   and Forests
22.    Indira Gandhi Memorial National Award forBest Environmental
& Ecological
23.    Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Purashkar
24.    Indira Gandhi NSS Award
25.    Indira Gandhi Award for National Integration
26.    Indira Gandhi Official Language Award Scheme
27. Indira Gandhi Award for Best First Film
28. Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Awards for The Town Official Language
29. Indira Gandhi Prize” for Peace, Disarmament and Development
30. Indira Gandhi Prize for Popularization of Science
31. Implementation
32. Indira Gandhi Shiromani Award
33. Indira Gandhi NSS Award/National Youth
34. Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Pushar award – search n correct
35. Indira Gandhi N.S.S Awards
36. Indira Gandhi award for social service, MP Govt.
37.    Post Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship Scheme
38.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Award Scheme
39.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Shield Scheme
40.    Indira Gandhi Vision of Wildlife Conservation Zoo, a seminar organized by
Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy.
41. Jawaharlal Nehru award for International peace worth Rs 15 lakh cash given to many international figures, every year, including Yasser Arafat of Palestine Liberation Front in 1988 and U Thant in 1965.
42. Soviet Land Nehru Award, a cash prize of Rs. 20,000 given to Shyam Benegal in Dec 89, in recognition of the above film.
43. Jawaharlal Nehru Balkalyan awards of Rs.10,000 each to 10 couples by Govt. of Maharashtra (ToI-28-4-89).
44. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi, for Academic Achievement
45. Jawaharlal Nehru birth centenary research award for energy
46. Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding
47. Nehru Bal Samiti Bravery Awards
48. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medal
49. Jawaharlal Nehru Prize” from 1998-99, to be given to organizations (preferably   NGOs) for Popularization of Science.
50. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Competition
51. Jawarharlal Nehru Student Award for research project of evolution of DNA
Scholarship / Fellowship
1. Rajiv Gandhi Scholarship Scheme for Students with Disabilities
2. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for SC/ST Candidates, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment
Budgetary Allocation for 2008-9 – 26.40 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 23.70 crores
3. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for ST Candidates
Budgetary Allocation for 2008-09 – 29.00 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 42.00 crores
4. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, IGNOU
5. Rajiv Gandhi Science Talent Research Fellows
6. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, Ministry of Tribal Affairs
Budgetary Allocation for  2008-9  – 16.00 crores
Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 22.50  crores
7. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for scheduled castes and scheduled          tribes candidates given by University Grants Commission
8. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship sponsored by the Commonwealth of Learning in           association with Indira Gandhi National Open University
9. Rajiv Gandhi science talent research fellowship given by Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced scientific research (to promote budding scientists) done in tandem with Department of Science and Technology and Rajiv Gandhi Foundation
10. Rajiv Gandhi HUDCO Fellowships in the Habitat Sector (to promote research in the field of sustainable Habitat development) for MPhil, {PhD Students for 2 to 3 years, conferred by HUDCO
11. Indira Gandhi Memorial Fellowships check
12. Fullbright scholarship now renamed Fullbright- Jawaharlal Nehru Scholarship
13. Cambridge Nehru Scholarships, 10 in number, for research at Cambridge University, London, leading to Ph. D. for 3 years, which include fee, maintenance allowance, air travel to UK and back.
14. Scheme of Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowships for Post-graduate Studies, Govt. of India.
15. Nehru Centenary (British) Fellowships/Awards
National Parks/ Sanctuaries/ Museums
1. Rajiv Gandhi (Nagarhole) Wildlife Sanctury, Karnataka
2. Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Sanctury, Andhra Pradesh
3. Indira Gandhi National Park, Tamil Nadu
4. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , New Delhi
5. Indira Gandhi National Park, Anamalai Hills on Western Ghats
6. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park, Vishakhapatnam
7. Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (IGRMS)
8. Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary, Pollachi
9. Rajiv Gandhi Health Museum
10. The Rajiv Gandhi Museum of Natural History
11. Indira Gandhi Memorial museum, New Delhi
12. Jawaharlal Nehru museum in Aurangabad, Maharashtra opened by state govt.
13. Jawaharlal Nehru memorial Gallery, London
14. Jawaharlal Nehru planetarium, Worli, Mumbai.
15. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Exhibition for Children
Hospitals/Medical Institutions
1. Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science, Bangalore, Karnataka
2. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi
3. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry
4. Shri Rajiv Gandhi college of Dental Science & Hospital,  Bangalore, Karnataka
5. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Bio Technology, Thiruvanthapuram, Kerala
6. Rajiv Gandhi College of Nursing, Bangalore, Karnataka
7. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Raichur
8. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases, Bangalore, Karnataka
9. Rajiv Gandhi Paramedical College, Jodhpur
10. Rajiv Gandhi Medical College, Thane, Mumbai
11. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Karnataka
12. Rajiv Gandhi Hospital, Goa
13. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh
14. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Delhi
15. Rajiv Gandhi Homoeaopathic Medical College, Chinar Park, Bhopal, M.P
16. North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences , Shilong, Meghalaya
17. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
18. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore
19. Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sheikhpura, Patna
20. The Indira Gandhi Paediatric Hospital, Afghanistan
21. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health Hospital, Dharmaram College, Bangalore
22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Heath, Bangalore
23. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla
24. Indira Gandhi Institute of Dental Science, Kerala
25. Indira Gandhi Memorial Ayurvedic Medical College & Hospital, Bhubaneshwar
26. Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur
27. Indira Gandhi Eye Hospital And Research Centre, Kolkata
28. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Shimla
29. Indira Gandhi Women and Children Hospital , Bhopla
30. Indira Gandhi Gas Relief hospital, Bhopal
31. Kamla Nehru Hospital, Shimla
32. Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya
33. Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research
(JIPMER), Puducherry
Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 127.84 crores
Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 117.51 crores
34. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Bhopal
35. Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College in Raipur.
36. Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College & Hospital, New Delhi
37. Nehru, Science Centre, Worli, Mumbai
38. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, Bhopal
39. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Homoeopathic Medical Sciences,
Maharashtra
Institutions / Chairs / Festivals
1.    Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development. (RGNIYD), Ministry of
Youth and Sports
2. Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute, Faridabad, Haryana
3. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission in Tribal Areas
4. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development
5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Chhattisgarh
6. Rajiv Gandhi Chair Endowment established in 1998 to create a Chair of South
Asian Economics
7. Rajiv Gandhi Project – A pilot to provide Education thru Massive Satellite
Connectivity up grassroot Level
8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited (Government of Karnataka
Enterprise)
9. Rajiv Gandhi Information and Technology Commission
10. Rajiv Gandhi Chair for Peace and Disarmament
11. Rajiv Gandhi Music Festival
12.   Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Lecture
13.    Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Diwas
14.    Rajiv Gandhi Education Foundation, Kerala
15.    Rajiv Gandhi Panchayati Raj Convention
16. The Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Educational and Charitable Society, Kasagod,
Kerala
17. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial trophy ekankika spardha, Prerana Foundation, Kari
Road
18. Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, Janpath, New Delhi
19. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj & Gramin Vikas Sansthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan
20. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam
21. Indira Gandhi  Institute for Development and Research , Mumbai
22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Cardiology (IGIC), Patna
23. Indira Gandhi National Center for the Arts, New Delhi
24. Indira Gandhi National Foundation, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
25. Indira Gandhi Mahila Sahakari Soot Girani Ltd, Maharashtra
26.    Indira Gandhi Conservation Monitoring Centre , Ministry of Environment &
Forest
27.    Post-Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship for Single Girl Child
28.    Jawahar Shetkari Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd.
29. Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan
30.    Jawaharlal Nehru Centenary celebrations
31.    Postal stamps of different denominations and one Rupee coins in memory of
Jawaharlal Nehru.
32.    Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Trust (U.K.) Scholarships
33. Jawaharlal Nehru Custom House Nhava Sheva, Maharashtra
34. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore
35. Jawaharlal Nehru Cultural Centre, Embassy of India, Moscow
36. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Udyog Kendra for Juveniles, Pune, Maharastra
37. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru college of agriculture and research institute ,
Pondicherry
Roads/Buildings/places
1. Rajiv Chowk, Delhi
2. Rajiv Gandhi Bhawan, Safdarjung, New Delhi
3. Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, New Delhi
4. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Kalkaji, Delhi
5. Indira Chowk, New Delhi
6. Nehru Planetarium, New Delhi
7. Nehru Yuvak Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi
8. Nehru Nagar, New Delhi
9. Nehru Place, New Delhi
10. Nehru Park, New Delhi Nehru House, BSZ Marg, New Delhi
11. Jawaharlal Nehru Government House New Delhi
12. Rajiv Gandhi Renewable Energy Park, Gurgaon, Haryana
13. Rajiv Gandhi Chowk, Andheri, Mumbai
14. Indira Gandhi Road, Mumbai
15. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Wadala, Mumbai
16. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Mulund, Mumbai
17. Nehru Nagar, Kurla, Mumbai
18. Jawaharlal Nehru gardens at Thane, Mumbai
19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Hall, Chennai
20. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Vadapalani, Chennai, Tamilnadu
21. Rajiv Gandhi Salai (Old Mahabalipuram road named after Rajiv Gandhi)
22. Rajiv Gandhi Education City, Haryana
23. Mount Rajiv, a peak in Himalaya
24. Rajiv Gandhi IT Habitat, Goa
25. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Chennai
26. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Vijayawada
27. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar in Coimbatore,  Tamil Nadu
28. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Trichy, Tamil Nadu
29. Rajiv Gandhi IT Park, Hinjewadi, Pune
30. Rajiv Gandhi Panchayat Bhav , Palanpur  Banaskantha
31. Rajiv Gandhi Chandigarh Technology Park, Chandigarh
32. Rajiv Gandhi Smriti Van, Jharkhand
33. Rajiv Gandhi statue, Panaji, Goa
34. Rajiv Gandhi Road, Chittoor
35. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial at Sriperumbudur
36. Indira Gandhi Memorial Library, University of Hyderabad
37. Indira Gandhi Musical Fountains, Bangalore
38. Indira Gandhi Planetarium , Lucknow
39. Indira Gandhi Centre for Indian Culture (IGCIC), High Commission of India, Mauritus
40. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , Eastern Ghats of India
41. Indira Gandhi Canal, Ramnagar, Jaisalmer
42. Indira Gandhi Industrial Complex, Ranipet, Vellore District
43. Indira Gandhi Park, Itanagar
44. Indira Gandhi Squiare , Pondicherry
45. Indira Gandhi Road, Willingdon Island, Cochin
46. Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden, Kashmir
47. Indira Gandhi Sagar Dam, Nagpur
48. Indira Gandhi bridge, Rameshvar, Tamil Nadu
49. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Bhiwandi Nizampur Municipal Corporation
50. Indira Gandhi memorial cultural Complex, UP Govt.
51. Indira Gandhi Sports Stadium , Rohru District, Shimla
52. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj Sansthan , Bhopal
53. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Rajasthan
54. Indira Nagar, Lucknow
55. Roads are named after Jawaharlal Nehru in many cities e.g. in Jaipur, Nagpur, Vile Parle, Ghatkopar, Mulund etc.
56. Nehru Nagar, Ghaziabad
57. Jawaharlal Nehru Gardens, Ambarnath
58. Jawarharlal Nehru Gardens, Panhala
59. Jawaharlal Nehru market, Jammu.
60. Jawaharlal Nehru Tunnel on the Jammu Srinagar Highway
61. Nehru Chowk, Ulhas Nagar, Maharashtra.
62. Nehru Bridge on the river Mandvi, Panaji, Goa
63. Nehru Nagar Ghaziabad
64. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Dharmatala, Kolkata
65. Nehru Road, Guwahati
66. Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur
67. Nehru Vihar Colony, Kalyanpur, Lucknow
68. Nehru Nagar, Patna
69. Jawaharlal Nehru Street, Pondicherry
70. Nehru Bazaar, Madanapalli, Tirupathi
71. Nehru Chowk, Bilaspur. M.P
72. Nehru Street, Ponmalaipatti, Tiruchirapalli
73. Nehru Nagar, S.M. Road, Ahmedabad
74. Nehru Nagar,. Nashik Pune Road

The following are some of the Government Schemes and Projects that have been named after the Nehru-Gandhi family.

Central Government Schemes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana, Ministry of Power – A scheme “Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana” for Rural Electricity Infrastructure and Household Electrification was launched for the attainment of the National Common Minimum Programme of providing access to electricity to all Rural Household by 2009. Rural Electrification Corporation (REC) is the nodal agency for the scheme. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana to be continued during the Eleventh Plan period with a capital subsidy of Rs. 28000 Crore; allocation of Rs 5500 crore for FY09.

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (RGNDWM), Ministry of Rural Development, Annual allocation plan 2007-08 was Rs.6,400 crore and Annual allocation plan 2008-09 is Rs.7,300 crore.

3. Rajiv Gandhi National Crèche Scheme for the Children of Working Mothers, Department of Women & Child Development, Ministry of HRD, New Delhi,

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – 91.88 crore.

Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – 91.52 crore

4. Rajiv Gandhi Udyami Mitra Yojana for benefit of NE entrepreneurs, Ministry of Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, Government of India,

Budgetary allocation 2008-9 – Rs. 2.70 crore

Budgetary allocation 2009-10 – Rs.1.12 crore

5. Indira Awas Yojana, Ministry of Rural Areas and Environment – IAY is a CSS funded on cost-sharing basis between the Centre and the States in the ratio of 75:25. In the case of UTs, the entire funds are provided by Centre. The target groups for housing under IAY are households below poverty line living in rural areas, particularly those belonging to SC/ST and freed bonded labourers.

Budgetary allocation 2008-09 – Rs. 7919.00 crores

Budgetary allocation  2009-10 – Rs.7914.70 crores

6. Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme – objective to provide social security to workers in the unorganized sector in a phased manner. Budgetary allocation in 2008-09 is Rs. 3,443 crore

7. Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission, Ministry of Urban Development,

Govt. of India – 7 years time frame, 50,000 cr.

Budgetary allocation for 2008 – 9 – 10447.98 crore

Budgetary allocation for 2009-10 – 10713.84 crore

8. Jawaharlal Nehru Rojgar Yojna – Ministry of Labour and Employment – A Self- employment programme for urban poor

9. Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Kalyan Yojna, Employees’ State Insurance Corporation

10. Indira Gandhi Canal Project, Funded by World Bank

11. Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojana, Union Ministry of Textiles, in association with ICICI Lombard General Insurance Company Limited

12. Indira Vikas Patra

State Government Schemes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Rehabilitation Package for Tsunami Affected Areas, Govt. of Tamil Nadu, Budgetary Allocation Rs.2347.19 crores

2. Rajiv Gandhi Social Security Scheme for poor people, Department of Revenue and Disaster Management, Govt. of Puducherry

3. Rajiv Ratna Awas Yojna – Congress party president and United Progressive Alliance (UPA) Chairperson Sonia Gandhi had announced that the Centre would give a package of Rs.1,500-crore for providing housing facilities to the poorer sections in Delhi, thus announcing the scheme.

4. Rajiv Gandhi Prathamik Shiksha Mission , Raigarh

5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Madhya Pradesh

6. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Food Security , Madhya Pradesh

7. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh

8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited is a Government Company established by the Government of Karnataka to cater to the housing needs of the Economically and Socially weaker sections of the society.  Registered in April 2000, its authorised Capital is Rs.10 crores with Rs.3 crore  paid up.

9. Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Development Mission, Rajasthan

10. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Literacy Programme, Assam

11. Rajiv Gandhi Swavlamban Rojgar Yojana, Govt. of NCT of Delhi

12. Rajiv Gandhi Mobile Aids Counseling and Testing Services, Rajiv Gandhi Foundation

13. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyarthi Suraksha Yojana, Maharashtra

14. Rajiv Gandhi Mission for Water Shed Management, M.P.

15. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission for Tribal Areas, MP

16. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry

17. Rajiv Gandhi Breakfast Scheme, Pondicherry

18. Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Divas, Punjab

19. Rajiv Gandhi Artisans Health and Life Insurance Scheme, Tamil Nadu

20. Rajiv Gandhi Zopadpatti and Nivara Prakalpa, Mumbai

21. Rajiv Arogya Sri programme , Gujrat State Govt. Scheme

22. Rajiv Gandhi Abhyudaya Yojana, AP

23. Rajiv Gandhi Computer Saksharta Mission, Jabalpur

24. Rajiv Gandhi Bridges and Roads Infrastructure Development Programme for the construction of new roads and bridges and strengthening of the existing ones in the state of Haryana

25. Rajiv Gandhi Gramin Niwara Prakalp, Maharashtra Govt.

26. Indira Gandhi Utkrishtha Chhattervritti Yojna for Post Plus Two Students, Himachal Pradesh Government Scheme, Sponsored by, Central Government

27. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme, Maharashtra Govt.

28. Indira Gandhi Prathisthan, Housing and Urban Planning Department, UP Govt

29. Indira Kranthi Patham Scheme, Andhra Pradesh

30. Indira Gandhi Nahar Pariyojana, State Govt. Scheme

31. Indira Gandhi Vruddha Bhumiheen Shetmajoor Anudan Yojana, Govt. of Maharashtra

32. Indira Gandhi Nahar Project  (IGNP), Jaisalmer, Govt. of Rajasthan

33. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Yojna, Govt. of Maharashtra

34. Indira Gandhi kuppam, State Govt. Welfare Scheme for Tsunami effected fishermen

35. Indira Gandhi Drinking Water Scheme-2006, Haryana Govt.

36. Indira Gandhi Niradhar Old, Landless, Destitute women farm labour Scheme,

Maharashtra Govt.

37. Indira Gandhi Women Protection Scheme , Maharashtra Govt.

38. Indira Gaon Ganga Yojana, Chattisgarh

39. Indira Sahara Yojana , Chattisgarh

40. Indira Soochna Shakti Yojana, Chattisgarh

41. Indira Gandhi Balika Suraksha Yojana , HP

42. Indira Gandhi Garibi Hatao Yojana (DPIP), MP

43. Indira Gandhi super thermal power project , Haryana Govt.

44. Indira Gandhi Water Project, Haryana Govt.

45. Indira Gandhi Sagar Project , Bhandara District Gosikhurd Maharashtra

46. Indira Jeevitha Bima Pathakam, AP Govt

47. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshani Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.

48. Indira Mahila Yojana Scheme, Meghalaya Govt

49. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, Chhattisgarh Govt.

50. Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Vivah Shagun Yojana, Haryana Govt.

51. Indira Gandhi Calf Rearing Scheme, The government of Andhra Pradesh helped most of the respondent families in acquiring female calves through this scheme.

52. Indira Gandhi Landless Agriculture Labour scheme, Maharashtra Govt.

Sports/Tournaments/Trophies 

1. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup Kabaddi Tournament

2. Rajiv Gandhi Sadbhavana Run

3. Rajiv Gandhi Federation Cup boxing championship

4. Rajiv Gandhi International tournament (football)

5. NSCI – Rajiv Gandhi road races, New Delhi

6. Rajiv Gandhi Boat Race, Kerala

7. Rajiv Gandhi International Artistic Gymnastic Tournament

8. Rajiv Gandhi Kabbadi Meet

9. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Roller Skating Championship

10. Rajiv Gandhi memorial marathon race, New Delhi

11. Rajiv Gandhi International Judo Championship, Chandigarh

12. Rajeev Gandhi Memorial Trophy for the Best College, Calicut

13. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Cricket Tournament, Initiated by Rahul Gandhi in Amethi

14. Rajiv Gandhi Gold Cup (U-21), football

15. Rajiv Gandhi Trophy (football)

16. Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Sportspersons

17. All Indira Rajiv Gandhi Basketball (Girls) Tournament, organized by Delhi State

18. All India Rajiv Gandhi Wrestling Gold Cup, organized by Delhi State

19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Jhopadpatti Football Tournament, Rajura

20. Rajiv Gandhi International Invitation Gold Cup Football Tournament, Jamshedpur

21. Rajiv Gandhi Mini Olympics, Mumbai

22. Rajiv Gandhi Beachball Kabaddi Federation

23. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Trophy Prerana Foundation

24. International Indira Gandhi Gold Cup Tournament

25. Indira Gandhi International Hockey Tournament

26. Indira Gandhi Boat Race

27. Jawaharlal Nehru International Gold Cup Football Tournament.

28. Jawaharlal Nehru Hockey Tournament.

Stadia

1. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Delhi

2. Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium, New Delhi

3. Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, New Delhi

4. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Stadium, Bawana

5. Rajiv Gandhi National Football Academy, Haryana

6. Rajiv Gandhi AC Stadium, Vishakhapatnam

7. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Pondicherry

8. Rajiv Gandhi Stadium, Nahariagun, Itanagar

9. Rajiv Gandhi Badminton Indoor Stadium, Cochin

10. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Kadavanthra,Ernakulam

11. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Complex , Singhu

12. Rajib Gandhi Memorial Sports Complex, Guwahati

13. Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad

14. Rajiv Gandhi Indoor Stadium, Cochin

15. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh

16. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Una, Himachal Pradesh

17. Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Vishakhapatnam

18. Indira Gandhi Stadium, Deogarh, Rajasthan

19. Gandhi Stadium, Bolangir, Orissa

Airports/ Ports

1. Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, New Hyderabad, A.P.

2. Rajiv Gandhi Container Terminal, Cochin

3. Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi

4. Indira Gandhi Dock, Mumbai

5. Jawaharlal Nehru Nava Sheva Port Trust, Mumbai

Total budgetary plan outlay 2008-9  – 69.92crore

Total budgetary plan outlay 2009-10 – 324 crore

Universities/Education Institutes

1. Rajiv Gandhi Indian Institute of Management, Shilong

2. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Ranchi, Jharkhand

3. Rajiv Gandhi Technical University, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.

4. Rajiv Gandhi School of Intellectual Property Law, Kharagpur, Kolkata

5. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Secundrabad

6. Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law, Patiala, Punjab

7. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports

Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 1.50 crore

Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 3.00 crore

8. Rajiv Gandhi Aviation Academy, Begumpet, Hyderabad, A.P

9. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam, Kerala

10. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering Research & Technology, Chandrapur, Maharashtra

11. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Airoli, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra

12. Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh

13. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Chola Nagar, Bangalore, Karnataka

14. Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal, M.P.

15. Rajiv Gandhi D.e.d. College, Latur, Maharashtra

16. Rajiv Gandhi College, Shahpura, Bhopal

17. Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies, New Delhi

18. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Raebareli, U.P.

19. Rajiv Gandhi Homeopathic Medical College, Bhopal, M.P.

20. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Post Graduate Studies, East Godavari District, A.P.

21. Rajiv Gandhi College of Education, Thumkur, Karnataka

22. Rajiv Gandhi College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu

23. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of IT and Biotechnology, Bhartiya Vidhyapeeth

24. Rajiv Gandhi High School, Mumbai, Maharashtra

25. Rajiv Gandhi Group of Institutions, Satna, M.P.

26. Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur, Tamil Nadu

27. Rajiv Gandhi Biotechnology Centre, R.T.M., Nagpur University

28. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

29. Rajiv Gandhi Mahavidyalaya, Madhya Pradesh

30. Rajiv Gandhi Post Graduate College, Allahabad, U.P.

31. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka

32. Rajiv Gandhi Govt. PG Ayurvedic College, Poprola, Himachal Pradesh

33. Rajiv Gandhi College, Satna, M.P.

34. Rajiv Gandhi Academy for Aviation Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

35. Rajiv Gandhi Madhyamic Vidyalaya, Maharashtra

36. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Contemporary Studies, Islamabad, Pakistan

37. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

38. Rajiv Gandhi Industrial Training Centre, Gandhinagar

39. Rajiv Gandhi University of Knowledge Technologies, Andhra Pradesh

40. Rajiv Gandhi Institute Of Distance Education, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu

41. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture , Tamil Nadu

42. Rajiv Gandhi University (Arunachal University), A.P.

43. Rajiv Gandhi Sports Medicine Centre (RGSMC), Kerela

44. Rajiv Gandhi Science Centre, Mauritus

45. Rajiv Gandhi Kala Mandir, Ponda, Goa

46. Rajiv Gandhi Vidyalaya, Mulund, Mumbai

47. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Polytechnic, Bangalore, Karnataka

48. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Circle Telecom Training Centre (India), Chennai

49. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Kasagod, Kerala

50. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College Of Aeronautics, Jaipur

51. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial First Grade College, Shimoga

52. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial College of Education, Jammu & Kashmir

53. Rajiv Gandhi South Campus, Barkacha, Varanasi

54. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Teacher’s Training College, Jharkhand

55. Rajiv Gandhi Degree College, Rajahmundry, A.P.

56. Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), New Delhi

57. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development & Research, Mumbai, Maharashtra

58. Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy, Dehradun

59. Indira Gandhi RashtriyaUran Akademi, Fursatganj Airfield, Rae Bareli, Uttar Pradesh

60. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai

61. Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Orissa

62. Indira Gandhi B.Ed. College, Mangalore

63. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Education, Nanded, Maharashtra

64. Indira Gandhi Balika Niketan B.ED. College, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan

65. Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur, Madhya Pradesh

66. Smt. Indira Gandhi College of Engineering, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra

67. Smt. Indira Gandhi Colelge, Tiruchirappalli

68. Indira Gandhi Engineering College, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh

69. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kashmere Gate, Delhi

70. Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology, Sarang, Dist. Dhenkanal, Orissa

71. Indira Gandhi Institute of Aeronautics, Pune, Maharashtra

72. Indira Gandhi Integral Education Centre, New Delhi

73. Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, Delhi University, Delhi

74. Indira Gandhi High School, Himachal

75. Indira Kala Sangit Vishwavidyalaya, Chhattisgarh

76. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

77. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Andhra Pradesh

78. Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, Uttarakashi

79. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Business Management, Vikram University

80. Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

81. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore

82. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, AP

83. Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

84. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced Scientific Research, a deemed university, Jakkur, P.O. Bangalore

85. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Social Studies, affiliated to Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapith (Pune, Maharashtra)

86. Jawaharlal Nehru College of Aeronautics & Applied Sciences, Coimbatore, (ESTD 1968)

87. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Katraj, Dhankwdi, Pune, Maharashtra

88. Kamal Kishore Kadam’s Jawaharlal Nehru Engineering College in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

89. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Education & Technological Research, Nanded, Maharashra

90. Jawaharlal Nehru College, Aligarh

91. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad

92. Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Jabalpur

93. Jawaharlal Nehru B.Ed. College, Kota, Rajasthan

94. Jawaharlal Nehru P.G. College, Bhopal

95. Jawaharlal Nehru Government Engineering College, Sundernagar, District Mandi, H.P.

96. Jawaharlal Nehru PublicSchool, Kolar Road, Bhopal

97. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kakinada, A.P.

98. Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Technology, Ibrahimpatti, Andhra Pradesh

Awards

1.   Rajiv Gandhi Award for Outstanding Achievement

2.   Rajiv Gandhi Shiromani Award

3.   Rajiv Gandhi Shramik Awards, Delhi Labour Welfare Board

4.   Rajiv Gandhi National Sadbhavana Award

5.   Rajiv Gandhi Manav Seva Award

6.   Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Conservation Award

7.   Rajiv Gandhi National Award Scheme for Original Book Writing on Gyan Vigyan

8.   Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award

9.   Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award, Instituted by Bureau of Indian Standards in 1991

10.   Rajiv Gandhi Environment Award for Clean Technology, Ministry of Environment & Forest, Govt. of India

11.   RajivGandhi Travelling Scholarship

12.   Rajiv Gandhi(UK) Foundation Scholarship

13.   Rajiv Gandhi Film Awards (Mumbai)

14.   Rajiv Gandhi Khelratna Puraskar

15.   Rajiv Gandhi Parisara Prashasti, Karnataka

16.   RajivGandhi Vocational Excellence Awards

17.   Rajiv Gandhi Excellence award

18.   Indira Gandhi Peace Prize

19.   Indira Gandhi Prize for National Integration

20.   Indira Gandhi Priyadarshini Award

21.   Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Awards, Ministry of Environment   and Forests

22.    Indira Gandhi Memorial National Award forBest Environmental & Ecological

23.    Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Purashkar

24.    Indira Gandhi NSS Award

25.    Indira Gandhi Award for National Integration

26.    Indira Gandhi Official Language Award Scheme

27. Indira Gandhi Award for Best First Film

28. Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Awards for The Town Official Language

29. Indira Gandhi Prize” for Peace, Disarmament and Development

30. Indira Gandhi Prize for Popularization of Science

31. Implementation

32. Indira Gandhi Shiromani Award

33. Indira Gandhi NSS Award/National Youth

34. Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Pushar award – search n correct

35. Indira Gandhi N.S.S Awards

36. Indira Gandhi award for social service, MP Govt.

37.    Post Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship Scheme

38.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Award Scheme

39.    Indira Gandhi Rajbhasha Shield Scheme

40.    Indira Gandhi Vision of Wildlife Conservation Zoo, a seminar organized by Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy.

41. Jawaharlal Nehru award for International peace worth Rs 15 lakh cash given to many international figures, every year, including Yasser Arafat of Palestine Liberation Front in 1988 and U Thant in 1965.

42. Soviet Land Nehru Award, a cash prize of Rs. 20,000 given to Shyam Benegal in Dec 89, in recognition of the above film.

43. Jawaharlal Nehru Balkalyan awards of Rs.10,000 each to 10 couples by Govt. of Maharashtra (ToI-28-4-89).

44. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi, for Academic Achievement

45. Jawaharlal Nehru birth centenary research award for energy

46. Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding

47. Nehru Bal Samiti Bravery Awards

48. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medal

49. Jawaharlal Nehru Prize” from 1998-99, to be given to organizations (preferably   NGOs) for Popularization of Science.

50. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Competition

51. Jawarharlal Nehru Student Award for research project of evolution of DNA

Scholarship / Fellowship

1. Rajiv Gandhi Scholarship Scheme for Students with Disabilities

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for SC/ST Candidates, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment

Budgetary Allocation for 2008-9 – 26.40 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 23.70 crores

3. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for ST Candidates

Budgetary Allocation for 2008-09 – 29.00 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 42.00 crores

4. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, IGNOU

5. Rajiv Gandhi Science Talent Research Fellows

6. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship, Ministry of Tribal Affairs

Budgetary Allocation for  2008-9  – 16.00 crores

Budgetary Allocation for 2009-10 – 22.50  crores

7. Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship Scheme for scheduled castes and scheduled tribes candidates given by University Grants Commission

8. Rajiv Gandhi Fellowship sponsored by the Commonwealth of Learning in association with Indira Gandhi National Open University

9. Rajiv Gandhi science talent research fellowship given by Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for advanced scientific research (to promote budding scientists) done in tandem with Department of Science and Technology and Rajiv Gandhi Foundation

10. Rajiv Gandhi HUDCO Fellowships in the Habitat Sector (to promote research in the field of sustainable Habitat development) for MPhil, {PhD Students for 2 to 3 years, conferred by HUDCO

11. Indira Gandhi Memorial Fellowships check

12. Fullbright scholarship now renamed Fullbright- Jawaharlal Nehru Scholarship

13. Cambridge Nehru Scholarships, 10 in number, for research at Cambridge University, London, leading to Ph. D. for 3 years, which include fee, maintenance allowance, air travel to UK and back.

14. Scheme of Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowships for Post-graduate Studies, Govt. of India.

15. Nehru Centenary (British) Fellowships/Awards

National Parks/ Sanctuaries/ Museums 

1. Rajiv Gandhi (Nagarhole) Wildlife Sanctury, Karnataka

2. Rajiv Gandhi Wildlife Sanctury, Andhra Pradesh

3. Indira Gandhi National Park, Tamil Nadu

4. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , New Delhi

5. Indira Gandhi National Park, Anamalai Hills on Western Ghats

6. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park, Vishakhapatnam

7. Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (IGRMS)

8. Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary, Pollachi

9. Rajiv Gandhi Health Museum

10. The Rajiv Gandhi Museum of Natural History

11. Indira Gandhi Memorial museum, New Delhi

12. Jawaharlal Nehru museum in Aurangabad, Maharashtra opened by state govt.

13. Jawaharlal Nehru memorial Gallery, London

14. Jawaharlal Nehru planetarium, Worli, Mumbai.

15. Jawaharlal Nehru National Science Exhibition for Children

Hospitals/Medical Institutions

1. Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science, Bangalore, Karnataka

2. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi

3. Rajiv Gandhi Home for Handicapped, Pondicherry

4. Shri Rajiv Gandhi college of Dental Science & Hospital,  Bangalore, Karnataka

5. Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Bio Technology, Thiruvanthapuram, Kerala

6. Rajiv Gandhi College of Nursing, Bangalore, Karnataka

7. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Raichur

8. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases, Bangalore, Karnataka

9. Rajiv Gandhi Paramedical College, Jodhpur

10. Rajiv Gandhi Medical College, Thane, Mumbai

11. Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Pharmacy, Karnataka

12. Rajiv Gandhi Hospital, Goa

13. Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Community Health, Madhya Pradesh

14. Rajiv Gandhi Super Specialty Hospital, Delhi

15. Rajiv Gandhi Homoeaopathic Medical College, Chinar Park, Bhopal, M.P

16. North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences , Shilong, Meghalaya

17. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

18. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore

19. Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sheikhpura, Patna

20. The Indira Gandhi Paediatric Hospital, Afghanistan

21. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health Hospital, Dharmaram College, Bangalore

22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Heath, Bangalore

23. Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla

24. Indira Gandhi Institute of Dental Science, Kerala

25. Indira Gandhi Memorial Ayurvedic Medical College & Hospital, Bhubaneshwar

26. Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur

27. Indira Gandhi Eye Hospital And Research Centre, Kolkata

28. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Shimla

29. Indira Gandhi Women and Children Hospital , Bhopla

30. Indira Gandhi Gas Relief hospital, Bhopal

31. Kamla Nehru Hospital, Shimla

32. Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya

33. Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry

Budgetary Allocation 2008-09 – 127.84 crores

Budgetary Allocation 2009-10 – 117.51 crores

34. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Bhopal

35. Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College in Raipur.

36. Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College & Hospital, New Delhi

37. Nehru, Science Centre, Worli, Mumbai

38. Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, Bhopal

39. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Homoeopathic Medical Sciences, Maharashtra

Institutions / Chairs / Festivals

1. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development. (RGNIYD), Ministry of  Youth and Sports

2. Rajiv Gandhi National Ground Water Training & Research Institute, Faridabad, Haryana

3. Rajiv Gandhi Food Security Mission in Tribal Areas

4. Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development

5. Rajiv Gandhi Shiksha Mission, Chhattisgarh

6. Rajiv Gandhi Chair Endowment established in 1998 to create a Chair of South Asian Economics

7. Rajiv Gandhi Project – A pilot to provide Education thru Massive Satellite Connectivity up grassroot Level

8. Rajiv Gandhi Rural Housing Corporation Limited (Government of Karnataka Enterprise)

9. Rajiv Gandhi Information and Technology Commission

10. Rajiv Gandhi Chair for Peace and Disarmament

11. Rajiv Gandhi Music Festival

12.   Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Lecture

13.    Rajiv Gandhi Akshay Urja Diwas

14.    Rajiv Gandhi Education Foundation, Kerala

15.    Rajiv Gandhi Panchayati Raj Convention

16. The Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Educational and Charitable Society, Kasagod,Kerala

17. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial trophy ekankika spardha, Prerana Foundation, Kari Road

18. Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, Janpath, New Delhi

19. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj & Gramin Vikas Sansthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan

20. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam

21. Indira Gandhi  Institute for Development and Research , Mumbai

22. Indira Gandhi Institute of Cardiology (IGIC), Patna

23. Indira Gandhi National Center for the Arts, New Delhi

24. Indira Gandhi National Foundation, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

25. Indira Gandhi Mahila Sahakari Soot Girani Ltd, Maharashtra

26.    Indira Gandhi Conservation Monitoring Centre , Ministry of Environment & Forest

27.    Post-Graduate Indira Gandhi Scholarship for Single Girl Child

28.    Jawahar Shetkari Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd.

29. Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan

30.    Jawaharlal Nehru Centenary celebrations

31.    Postal stamps of different denominations and one Rupee coins in memory of Jawaharlal Nehru.

32.    Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Trust (U.K.) Scholarships

33. Jawaharlal Nehru Custom House Nhava Sheva, Maharashtra

34. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore

35. Jawaharlal Nehru Cultural Centre, Embassy of India, Moscow

36. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru Udyog Kendra for Juveniles, Pune, Maharastra

37. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru college of agriculture and research institute , Pondicherry

Roads/Buildings/places

1. Rajiv Chowk, Delhi

2. Rajiv Gandhi Bhawan, Safdarjung, New Delhi

3. Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, New Delhi

4. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Kalkaji, Delhi

5. Indira Chowk, New Delhi

6. Nehru Planetarium, New Delhi

7. Nehru Yuvak Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi

8. Nehru Nagar, New Delhi

9. Nehru Place, New Delhi

10. Nehru Park, New Delhi Nehru House, BSZ Marg, New Delhi

11. Jawaharlal Nehru Government House New Delhi

12. Rajiv Gandhi Renewable Energy Park, Gurgaon, Haryana

13. Rajiv Gandhi Chowk, Andheri, Mumbai

14. Indira Gandhi Road, Mumbai

15. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Wadala, Mumbai

16. Indira Gandhi Sports Complex, Mulund, Mumbai

17. Nehru Nagar, Kurla, Mumbai

18. Jawaharlal Nehru gardens at Thane, Mumbai

19. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial Hall, Chennai

20. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Vadapalani, Chennai, Tamilnadu

21. Rajiv Gandhi Salai (Old Mahabalipuram road named after Rajiv Gandhi)

22. Rajiv Gandhi Education City, Haryana

23. Mount Rajiv, a peak in Himalaya

24. Rajiv Gandhi IT Habitat, Goa

25. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Chennai

26. Rajiv Gandhi Park, Vijayawada

27. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar in Coimbatore,  Tamil Nadu

28. Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Trichy, Tamil Nadu

29. Rajiv Gandhi IT Park, Hinjewadi, Pune

30. Rajiv Gandhi Panchayat Bhav , Palanpur  Banaskantha

31. Rajiv Gandhi Chandigarh Technology Park, Chandigarh

32. Rajiv Gandhi Smriti Van, Jharkhand

33. Rajiv Gandhi statue, Panaji, Goa

34. Rajiv Gandhi Road, Chittoor

35. Rajiv Gandhi Memorial at Sriperumbudur

36. Indira Gandhi Memorial Library, University of Hyderabad

37. Indira Gandhi Musical Fountains, Bangalore

38. Indira Gandhi Planetarium , Lucknow

39. Indira Gandhi Centre for Indian Culture (IGCIC), High Commission of India, Mauritus

40. Indira Gandhi Zoological Park , Eastern Ghats of India

41. Indira Gandhi Canal, Ramnagar, Jaisalmer

42. Indira Gandhi Industrial Complex, Ranipet, Vellore District

43. Indira Gandhi Park, Itanagar

44. Indira Gandhi Squiare , Pondicherry

45. Indira Gandhi Road, Willingdon Island, Cochin

46. Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden, Kashmir

47. Indira Gandhi Sagar Dam, Nagpur

48. Indira Gandhi bridge, Rameshvar, Tamil Nadu

49. Indira Gandhi Hospital, Bhiwandi Nizampur Municipal Corporation

50. Indira Gandhi memorial cultural Complex, UP Govt.

51. Indira Gandhi Sports Stadium , Rohru District, Shimla

52. Indira Gandhi Panchayati Raj Sansthan , Bhopal

53. Indira Gandhi Nagar, Rajasthan

54. Indira Nagar, Lucknow

55. Roads are named after Jawaharlal Nehru in many cities e.g. in Jaipur, Nagpur, Vile Parle, Ghatkopar, Mulund etc.

56. Nehru Nagar, Ghaziabad

57. Jawaharlal Nehru Gardens, Ambarnath

58. Jawarharlal Nehru Gardens, Panhala

59. Jawaharlal Nehru market, Jammu.

60. Jawaharlal Nehru Tunnel on the Jammu Srinagar Highway

61. Nehru Chowk, Ulhas Nagar, Maharashtra.

62. Nehru Bridge on the river Mandvi, Panaji, Goa

63. Nehru Nagar Ghaziabad

64. Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Dharmatala, Kolkata

65. Nehru Road, Guwahati

66. Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur

67. Nehru Vihar Colony, Kalyanpur, Lucknow

68. Nehru Nagar, Patna

69. Jawaharlal Nehru Street, Pondicherry

70. Nehru Bazaar, Madanapalli, Tirupathi

71. Nehru Chowk, Bilaspur. M.P

72. Nehru Street, Ponmalaipatti, Tiruchirapalli

73. Nehru Nagar, S.M. Road, Ahmedabad

74. Nehru Nagar,. Nashik Pune Road

The entire details of the schemes are available in Suryaprakash’s blog.

Related article : From Cradle to grave, be grateful to Nehru-Gandhis!

July 17, 2009

Indira Gandhi – India’s best primeminister?

A little old article by Tavleen Singh on Indira Gandhi.Appeared on Indian Express.

As someone who believes Indira Gandhi was India’s worst Prime Minister it shocks me when I meet people who think she was the best. Mostly these are illiterate villagers who sometimes think she is still alive because they have just received a house under the Indira Awas Yojana. Or some other sop under another scheme named for her. She was a clever politician,Mrs Gandhi, and it was in her time that schemes paid for with taxpayers money were named after her or her Daddy.

Congress governments have continued the practice because it is a clever way of using our money to pay for their propaganda. Simple, rural people can be forgiven for being fooled but what are we to make of educated young voters who vote online to declare Mrs Gandhi as their Dream Prime Minister?

A poll conducted last week by an English daily found that 13 per cent of those polled said Mrs Gandhi was their Dream Prime Minister. Sardar Patel polled the same number of votes but since he never had the job there is nothing to discuss. As a responsible political pundit who has written about Indian politics since the month in which Mrs Gandhi declared the Emergency I believe it is my duty to explain to young first time voters why it’s time they started reading their history books with a more investigative eye.

Let us examine her political ‘achievements’. Her admirers admire her most for winning the Bangladesh war. Congress Party chamchas rave about how this was the first war India won in many centuries. But, from a retrospective viewpoint all it has done for India is create an endless supply of desperately poor refugees who have come in such large numbers that they have altered the demography of whole districts and in Assam virtually the whole state. If this were not enough of a problem we now have Bangladesh turning into a centre for the jihad with established links to the worldwide web of Islamist terrorists who hate Hindu India.

Domestically Mrs Gandhi’s tenure as Prime Minister served mostly to create huge problems in Punjab and Kashmir without solving those that already existed in the Northeastern states. When Rajiv Gandhi became Prime Minister one of the first things he did was to try to bring peace in these troubled states. Had he been wise and allowed a free election in Jammu & Kashmir in 1986 we may not have had a Kashmir problem today. But, he was young and Mummy’s old advisers told him to force an alliance with the National Conference, which turned into a political suicide pact for both parties.

If during this time of terrible political instability dear Dream Prime Minister had been building up the Indian economy through wise policies and through simply paying attention to the changes taking place in Southeast Asia we may still have been alright. But, even as our old enemy China opened its moribund communist economy to foreign investment and capitalist ideas,

Mrs Gandhi kept India’s wrapped in red tape, state controls and central planning. It was such a bizarre time that industrialists who produced more than the quotas allotted to them were treated like criminals. Her devoted daughter-in-law recently said bank nationalisation was the reason why India had not been affected by the international financial meltdown. This is nonsense. Bank nationalisation kept Indian banks in a prolonged dark age until foreign banks arrived to show them how much they needed to change.

The poor found it just as hard to get loans from nationalised banks as from private ones. Only governments benefited and they borrowed and spent recklessly. Mrs Gandhi’s family continues to speak of the ‘the poor’ as if they were the only ones who cared for them. The truth is that if Rahul Gandhi were truly in touch with life in the real India he would not need to spend the night in a Dalit hut to find out how bad things are.

His little sister, Priyanka, is proud that she looks like Dadi and has recently taken to wearing her saris to establish continuity. She would do better to sit with her brother and try and analyse why India remained such a horribly poor country despite nearly forty years of being ruled by their immediate family.

As for you who complain daily about the collapse of democratic institutions and the need for judicial and administrative reform please remember that if there is a single individual who can be blamed that individual would be Indira Gandhi. The two decades in which her ‘towering personality’ loomed over the Indian political landscape were a time of wasted opportunities, corruption and cynicism. A time when Mrs Gandhi’s stenographers were more powerful than Cabinet ministers. She was a bad Leader. It was a bad time.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Additional Information for readers:-

The illegal migration of Bangladeshis in Assam started with one legal act that was passed by Indira Gandhi Government called IMDT Act in 1983. Details of the sequence of passing this act and subsequent abolishment years later, by the Supreme court, are given here.
As per this act, any person in Assam can roam freely without having to prove his nationality as Indian, and anyone who thinks he is a migrant or a foreigner has to prove so.
The act is different than the foreigners act, which has been so far followed in rest of India, which requires a person to prove his nationality if asked. This opened the gates for lacs of Bangladeshi migrants to settle in Assam.
What in the right state of mind, caused the Congress government to allow a different law for people in one state than in others? What made them treat some foreigner in Assam different than foreigners in rest of India?
If you are in Europe, you would be jailed for not having a proper visa or staying even an hour after the allowed visa duration.
When will India take stern actions for its National Security?

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.