The Candid Eye

June 30, 2009

Hot Chilli Grenades

Indian defence scientists in DRDO are determined to make use of Naga Chilli (in the image below),which measures over a million SHU(Scoville Heat Units) in their attempt to create grenade bombs,loaded with Naga Chilli – Bhut Jolokia,which was awarded, the hottest of all spices by Guinness world records in Sep 2006.

Bhut Jolokia

Hottest in the World!!

Defence Research Laboratory (DRL), Tezpur is harnessing all this spice, particularly Bhut Jolokia,into military applications, such as high-effective tear gas.The WWF has asked DRL to explore the possibilities of using Naga Chillies to keep the wild elephants away from entering villages and fields.

Researchers say the idea is to replace explosives in small hand grenades with a certain variety of red chilli to immobilise people without killing them.
The chilli, known as Bhut Jolokia, is said to be 1,000 times hotter than commonly used kitchen chilli.

Researchers say the idea is to replace explosives in small hand grenades with a certain variety of red chilli to immobilise people without killing them.The chilli, known as Bhut Jolokia, is said to be 1,000 times hotter than commonly used kitchen chilli.The powder will also be spread on the fences around army barracks in the hope the strong smell will keep out animals.Other forms of pepper spray are commonly used for crowd control in many parts of the world.

What makes DRL Tezpur different from every other DRDO laboratory is its sharp focus on the specific problems of northeast India. For jawans deployed here, few issues are as important as the provision of clean drinking water in remote posts separated from each other by days of marching across mountains and jungles.

DRL’s first developed a portable water testing kit, with which soldiers could test water wherever they moved. The kit monitored 11 parameters, including pH level, hardness, and iron content. Initially it lacked an arsenic detector; that was developed and patented last year. The technology for the water testing kit was transferred to three private companies. It proved highly effective during the floods around Nasik last year.

Sources:

India Plans hot chilli grenades – BBC

The Naga Chilli – Spicing up DRDO research

Advertisements

June 29, 2009

‘You cannot pick, choose and hang,’ Govt says on Afzal case

Filed under: Congress,India,Indian Politics,UPA — thecandideye @ 6:29 AM
Tags: , , ,
Government on Friday said the execution of death sentence of Afzal Guru, convicted in the Parliament attack case, was being delayed as “you cannot pick, choose and hang” and there were many mercy petitions pending for long.
“You cannot pick, choose and hang. Nowhere does it happen in the world including Pakistan,” Law and Justice Minister M Veerappa Moily told a ‘meet the press’ programme organised by Press Association here.
Noting that no country which has rule of law can have such a hanging carried out “at the discretion of any political party”, Moily said there was need for evolving a mechanism for quick disposal of mercy petitions.
He said 28 mercy petitions were pending for disposal for long.

Law and Justice minister, Veerappa Moily has hinted that Congress goverment is not capable of disposing mere 28 mercy petitions.Excerpts from “The Pioneer” with my emphasis.

####### Start of excerpts from “The Pioneer” ########

Government on Friday said the execution of death sentence of Afzal Guru, convicted in the Parliament attack case, was being delayed as “you cannot pick, choose and hang” and there were many mercy petitions pending for long.

“You cannot pick, choose and hang. Nowhere does it happen in the world including Pakistan,” Law and Justice Minister M Veerappa Moily told a ‘meet the press’ programme organised by Press Association here.Also nowhere in the world would a terrorist be considered for clemency but in India under the name of secularism.Secularism is to protect minorities only and not for the terrorists who are from the minority community.

Noting that no country which has rule of law can have such a hanging carried out “at the discretion of any political party”, Moily said there was need for evolving a mechanism for quick disposal of mercy petitions.He said 28 mercy petitions were pending for disposal for long.

If we cannot pick,choose and hang the terrorists,then,they will pick,choose and kill/attack/bomb us.Thanks Mr.Moily and to your goverment,for showing mercy to the people who killed my countrymen mercilessly.Thanks Mr.Moily and to your goverment,because you humiliated  the brave police officers who sacrificed their lives to protect you guys,sitting in the parliament at that time.Thanks Mr.Moily for ditching the people who elected you.

####### End of excerpts from “The Pioneer” ########

June 28, 2009

Bigotry alive for Christian Dalits

Filed under: Christianity,Evangelists — thecandideye @ 6:29 AM
Tags: , , , ,
Centuries ago, as their forefathers faced social and economic deprivation, many low-caste Hindus embraced Christianity.
But in one corner of southern India, their hopes for equality remain unfulfilled hundreds of years on. Called “pariahs”, hundreds of Dalit Christians continue to face discrimination – not from Hindus but fellow Christians.
More than 200km (124 miles) from Chennai, the capital of the southern state of Tamil Nadu, is the village of Eraiyur.
Home to about 3,000 Dalit Christians, mostly farm labourers and migrant workers, the area witnessed violence last year when Dalits demanded equal treatment.
The village is dominated by Vanniyar Christians numbering 15,000, who own most of the land and businesses.

Centuries ago, as their forefathers faced social and economic deprivation, many low-caste Hindus embraced Christianity.

But in one corner of southern India, their hopes for equality remain unfulfilled hundreds of years on. Called “pariahs”, hundreds of Dalit Christians continue to face discrimination – not from Hindus but fellow Christians.More than 200km (124 miles) from Chennai, the capital of the southern state of Tamil Nadu, is the village of Eraiyur.

Home to about 3,000 Dalit Christians, mostly farm labourers and migrant workers, the area witnessed violence last year when Dalits demanded equal treatment.The village is dominated by Vanniyar Christians numbering 15,000, who own most of the land and businesses.

They imposed restrictions on Dalits even though they had also converted to Christianity.

Restricted life

A 17th Century church building, Lady of the Rosary Parish, stands tall above the Eraiyur settlement. The village came up around the parish church, with Vanniyar houses closest to it. The Dalits were forced to build their small huts on the fringe of the village.

It did not take long for the divisions within the Hindu social system to be reflected among the new Christians.The dominant Vanniyars created rules which restricted the movement of the Dalits.

When they visited the parish church they were not allowed to walk on the main street leading to the building. Instead they had to use a side street that led to the church gate.When Dalits died they were not allowed to be buried in the cemetery. Their burial ground is beyond the village and can only be accessed through a broken path.

In addition, the funeral cart parked inside the church building can be used only by Vanniyars.”We were told not to touch any upper caste person, not to get too close to them, not to talk to them,” says Mrs Peraiyamaka, 60, a farm labourer who has been visiting the parish church since childhood.

“It is no different now.”Mr Thomas, a 60-year-old labourer says there is also a fear of violence as young Dalits refuse to be submitted to such humiliation.He says this fear prompted the Dalits to build an alternative church.

A single-room, white-washed brick structure with an iron grill for the entrance is set in a small open ground.Called Our Lady of Perpetual Help, the Dalit church has a coloured icon of Virgin Mary with Baby Jesus in her arms. She is flanked by plastic flowers and incense sticks burn on the sides.

The Dalits’ demands of recognition for their church were rejected by local Catholic priests on the ground that a village can have only one parish church.Mr Mathew is a Dalit activist who graduated from Madras University.Having faced prejudice as a schoolboy, he has now decided to fight for the rights of Dalits.

His efforts to seek justice have created tension in his village, forcing him to move to elsewhere.He is angry that although the constitution has banned “untouchability” it continues to be practised in different ways.“My family may get some minimum help or guidance from Christianity. That’s all. There is no big change after we came to Christianity,” says Mr Mathew.

Vanniyars disgruntled

As we walked out of the Dalit quarters towards the well laid-out area where Vanniyar Christians live under the shadow of the whitewashed parish church, we were greeted by a few angry women.They did not want us to take pictures and asked us to leave.

A few angry residents of Vanniyar quarters gathered around us. They agreed to answer our questions. Emily, 25, was eager to give their version of the story.”We have allowed them to use the road. They are creating trouble,” she says.

We asked her how in a free country one group could dictate to others on the use of a public road.”I don’t know. It’s been like this… but we have now allowed them,” Emily replied.Similar responses came from other Vanniyars we spoke to.

Mr Arukadas, a retired government teacher lives next to the parish church and he shared his unhappiness with the Dalit Christians.Asked about using a common funeral van and a graveyard where all Christians irrespective of their past Hindu caste identity can be buried, he retorted: “It will take a long time for a common graveyard.”

Source : Sunil Raman from BBC

June 27, 2009

Weekend readings

Filed under: India,Islam — thecandideye @ 6:29 AM
Tags: , ,

Start reading this post from Dr. K Prabhakar Rao’s blog

Poor muslim girls plight in Hyderabad” and

“Islam lags behind west and its backwardness is self doing”

A video from Pat Condell on Islam

About the state of matters in Pakistan

Here is an article by Pervez Amirali Hoodbhoy  published in Frontline,March 14,2009.

Pervez Amirali Hoodbhoy is Professor and Chairman of the Physics Department at Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad.

Related articles:-

Stop funding my failing state

Threat of re-partitioning of India?

Madrasa=CBSE?

Is Congress selling India to Pakistan?

June 26, 2009

New prayer groups spread abhorrence for Hinduism: Catholic Church

Filed under: Christianity,Evangelists — thecandideye @ 6:29 AM
Tags: , , ,
The Catholic Church in Kerala has called on its flock to keep away from some of the new mass prayer movements that promise
miracles. The warning issued in the form of a pastoral letter also blames these sects of spreading abhorrence for Hinduism.
“They teach that evil spirits would come to us if we use some kinds of flowers, pictures of elephants or peacock, lamps or `mangalsutra’. They are spreading the message that by using things which other religions consider sacred, the sins would also come to the user. All this show only their abhorrence for Hindu religion,” says the letter signed among others by Kerala Catholic Bishop Council president Daniel Acharuparambil and president ofthe Catholic Bishops Conference of India Cardinal Varkey Vithayathil.
It says though the Catholic Church preaches only Jesus, it does not disregard what is true or divine in other religions. The Bible even teaches to treat other religions with respect, the letter adds.
The Catholic Church has its own mass prayer movements and these had played a significant role in reviving faith in the Bible, it said. However, the new groups were flouting all prescribed rules on interpreting the Bible, the state council charged.
Naming at least seven such sects in the state, the letter called on the clergy to ensure that they did not mislead the laity. Those who claim that they have had revelations or could cure diseases through miracle should be assessed logically, it added.
The letter evoked sharp response from the Indian Pentecostal Church (IPC) which termed it as a “desperate act” by the Catholic Church to stem the loss of its flock. “Large number of Catholics are leaving for other new-life sects and this was worrying them as their very existence is in danger, said IPC president K M Joseph. “We only preach the gospel. The accusation against us is only an attempt to confuse the Hindus.”

The Catholic Church in Kerala has called on its flock to keep away from some of the new mass prayer movements that promise miracles. The warning issued in the form of a pastoral letter also blames these sects of spreading abhorrence for Hinduism.

“They teach that evil spirits would come to us if we use some kinds of flowers, pictures of elephants or peacock, lamps or `mangalsutra’. They are spreading the message that by using things which other religions consider sacred, the sins would also come to the user. All this show only their abhorrence for Hindu religion,” says the letter signed among others by Kerala Catholic Bishop Council president Daniel Acharuparambil and president ofthe Catholic Bishops Conference of India Cardinal Varkey Vithayathil.

It says though the Catholic Church preaches only Jesus, it does not disregard what is true or divine in other religions. The Bible even teaches to treat other religions with respect, the letter adds.

The Catholic Church has its own mass prayer movements and these had played a significant role in reviving faith in the Bible, it said. However, the new groups were flouting all prescribed rules on interpreting the Bible, the state council charged.

Naming at least seven such sects in the state, the letter called on the clergy to ensure that they did not mislead the laity. Those who claim that they have had revelations or could cure diseases through miracle should be assessed logically, it added.

The letter evoked sharp response from the Indian Pentecostal Church (IPC) which termed it as a “desperate act” by the Catholic Church to stem the loss of its flock. “Large number of Catholics are leaving for other new-life sects and this was worrying them as their very existence is in danger, said IPC president K M Joseph. “We only preach the gospel. The accusation against us is only an attempt to confuse the Hindus.”

Source: TOI

June 25, 2009

Delhi fiddles while the northeast burns

Filed under: India — thecandideye @ 6:29 AM
Tags: , , , , , ,

From Tarun Vijay, editor of RSS weekly Panchjanya.Appeared on Rediff, few years ago.

Visiting Nagaland makes you feel different. You have to procure an inner line permit to enter. The permit demands to know why I am going there, where I shall stay and to be sure about my credentials I needed a guaranteer to vouch for me, my safe conduct and return within the stated period. Issued by the deputy commissioner’s office this permit is governed under the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation Act 1873. Yes, 1873.
The British left India in 1947. We are celebrating the 60th anniversary of that freedom obtained after our motherland’s division and the massacres that followed. Still, I needed a permit, something that the British began to isolate these regions in the name of ‘protecting’ the local indigenous people. The same procedure is also in vogue in Arunachal Pradesh.
So, we, legitimate Indians, are required to obtain a permit — another name for a ‘visa’ — but these states are reeling under the heat of illegal Muslim infiltrators from Bangladesh, who, obviously do not need to get an permit to enter, buy land, marry local girls and become so dominant that even the state authorities feel afraid to oust them.
Arunachal Pradesh’s student bodies recently compelled Chief Minister Dorjee Khandu to take action against the Bangladeshis. So what did he do? He pushed a couple of thousands to Assam and the matter ended. In Assam it created a furore. The Muslim bodies, specially the All Assam Minorities Students Union, threatened to oust Hindus from Muslim majority districts like Dhubri, Goalpara and Barpeta, so Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi ‘certified’ that all those ousted by the Arunachal Pradesh government are Assamese and shall be accommodated in Barpeta!
The situation is so serious and Delhi’s apathy so mindboggling that the people have lost all hope. The All Assam Students Union, which spearheaded an unprecedented movement in the 1980s to oust Bangladeshi infiltrators, has in utter desperation said that in the next ten years Assam may have a Bangladeshi chief minister. Strong and alarming words indeed. But neither the media nor the political parties paid any attention.
Assam has been transformed beyond recognition. The state’s cultural identity is symbolised by the great reformer and rejuvenator Srimat Sankar Dev. His birthlace in Dhing, near Bardowa, is a must-visit pilgrim centre for every Assamese Hindu. Now the Dhing assembly constituency has 90.02 percent Muslims. No prizes to guess how this Hindu pilgrim centre became a Muslim majority town because of the Bangladeshi influx.
Assam’s latest political star is Maulana Badruddin Ajmal, a perfume tycoon, who formed a new political party, the United Democratic Front, in 2005 and won 10 seats in the 2006 assembly election, surprising everyone. Previously he used to remote control other secular parties. Now he has taken the reins in his hands.
Assam and other northeastern states have become more volatile than Kashmir, but Delhi’s page three media and corrupt polity don’t see beyond their immediate concerns.
After Assam and Arunachal Pradesh, it is Nagaland’s turn now. Bangladeshi jihadi factories supplying men and material are creating havoc from Itanagar to Kohima and Hyderabad. They are there before everybody’s eyes, yet no government has shown a steely resolve to identify them and send them back. Aliens are turned into voters for political gain. The lines dividing traitors and patriots are getting blurred. Patriotic people need permits, they are made to live a refugee’s life, but aliens feel quite confident and vocal to aggressively enter our country, bomb it and yet find sympathies in the corridors of power.
In Nagaland, people are sandwiched between the insurgent groups and the Bangladeshi influx. The headquarters of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (Issac-Muivah group) is in Hebron, 30 odd kilometres from Dimapur. Everywhere, while going to Kohima one can see posters demanding ‘quick results of peace talks’ and a greater Nagalim which they want in the name of Christ — a separate independent country. According to government sources there are about 75,000 Bangladeshi Muslims in Nagaland today.
I had come to attend a seminar organised by a daring tribal organisation, the Janajati Vikas Samiti, which had invited about 80 participants from the northeastern states. Nagaland Home Minister Thenucho inaugurated the conference. Former state secretary C M Chang headed the organising committee. It was incredible to see so many tribal leaders engrossed in what can be termed a free discussion on the problems Nagaland faces — Bangladeshi infiltration being the foremost.
Minister Thenucho was forthcoming and said this problem has to be seen as a demographic invasion. ‘The Naga people may be soon reduced to miserable sufferers by these infiltrators, who may appear as an asset for providing cheap labour and easily available hands for menial jobs. But look what they have done elsewhere and there is no guarantee that they will not do the same here. Today they work as labourers; tomorrow Nagas will have to work for them, if we do not stand up and say no to them,’ the minister said. He was serious.
The only problem is the Centre does not share their anxieties. Nothing that binds Naga society with the rest of the country has ever been encouraged and strengthened. Natwar Thakkar started his Gandhi ashram in Mokukchang but could never expand his mission of spreading Gandhi’s sublime thoughts beyond that.
To be in Kohima is still considered a matter of fear, pregnant with life and death questions. There is no icon of India that can be seen here. In the early 1980s a Gandhi statue was installed in Kohima, only to be desecrated and destroyed soon. ‘Nagaland doesn’t need any Indian’s statue’ was the decree issued by the insurgents.
Almost everyone, from IAS officers to traders and teachers, have to cough up a part of their earnings to the insurgents. Their ‘freedom days’, ‘republic days’ are celebrated in full public view with the media from Kolkata and Delhi in attendance. Presently there is a ceasefire between the NSCN (IM) and the Indian Army, but rumours are afloat that this period has been better utilised by the insurgents to reinforce its battalions with new recruits, procure better weapons and resources to press for its demand for an ‘independent ‘Nagalim’, which seeks to ‘add’ parts of Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh to its fold.
This has enraged Manipuri and Arunachali tribals and a tribal war cannot be ruled out if the Naga insurgents’ demand is given any sympathy.
The press is lively but cocooned in its own world. “We have never been invited to join any prime minister’s party on his foreign visits, Delhi and Kolkata papers reach us very late, after a day or two, that too the dak edition,’ said Geoffrey Yaden, editor of the Nagaland Post, the main daily newspaper in the state. “They don’t understand us properly, they write to please their egos. Nobody has the time and interest to understand our people or to make serious efforts to create bridges and strengthen national feelings here. Are politicians sitting in Delhi are bothered about us or the nation?” he lamented.
I know it is very difficult to have a Delhi leader or social activist or cultural tsar to find time for a northeast visit. How many of us would go to Manipur or Nagaland or Arunachal for a family trip? Do we know that the most scintillating lakes, mountains, rivers and forests are in the northeast, bettering even Kashmir’s panorama? Unfortunately the northeast has yet to register in our minds as markedly as Hardwar, Manali, Goa [Images] or Rameshwaram.
Corruption to the northeast’s politicians is ‘taught’ by politicians in New Delhi. Even to get a central grant released for these states, central ministers and their durbaris have to be suitably ‘pleased’. The grants that go to the northeast finally come back in large parts to the Delhi durbar through traders, contractors, commission agents and sanctioning ministers. The rest is divided amongst local ‘beneficiaries’, including the insurgents.
In view of the infiltration threat faced by Nagaland and other northeastern states, an observation by E Ramamohan, the former director general, Border Security Force, who was with me in Kohima, should be an eyeopener. He warns about the insurgent groups’ long-term planning for 2015 — “Today there are several Islamic fundamentalist insurgent groups in Assam, all created with the help of the Director General Forces Intelligence of Bangladesh and Pakistan’s Inter Services Intelligence. The main groups are the Muslim United Liberation Front of Assam, the Muslim United Tigers of Assam and the Islamic Liberation Army of Assam… what is most interesting that these Islamic fundamentalist groups have not started operations so far. Interrogations of the suspects and intelligence reports have revealed that they are in a preparation phase. Motivating and recruiting cadres, training them in Pakistan, stockpiling arms and explosives for the insurgency is their present strategy. The target is (to launch an assault) in 2015.”
Why can’t we understand that India shrinks from every inch that is occupied by Bangladeshi infiltrators in our territory? In less than 100 years India has shrunk like no other nation on earth.
We lost Taxila, Karachi, Dhaka. Post independence, we lost 1.25 lakh square kilometres of land to Pakistan and China. Beijing [Images] still eyes Arunachal Pradesh.
Then Indians lost lands and homes in the Kashmir valley and became refugees for the ‘sin’ of supporting India. Now, jihadis, Maoists and church-supported insurgents want their share. Where will this all lead to? All the power, position, money and glitter weigh nothing before the question of the nation’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. At least in the northeast, people feel nobody listens to their woes in Delhi.

Visiting Nagaland makes you feel different. You have to procure an inner line permit to enter. The permit demands to know why I am going there, where I shall stay and to be sure about my credentials I needed a guaranteer to vouch for me, my safe conduct and return within the stated period. Issued by the deputy commissioner’s office this permit is governed under the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation Act 1873. Yes, 1873.

The British left India in 1947. We are celebrating the 60th anniversary of that freedom obtained after our motherland’s division and the massacres that followed. Still, I needed a permit, something that the British began to isolate these regions in the name of ‘protecting’ the local indigenous people. The same procedure is also in vogue in Arunachal Pradesh.

So, we, legitimate Indians, are required to obtain a permit — another name for a ‘visa’ — but these states are reeling under the heat of illegal Muslim infiltrators from Bangladesh, who, obviously do not need to get an permit to enter, buy land, marry local girls and become so dominant that even the state authorities feel afraid to oust them.

Arunachal Pradesh’s student bodies recently compelled Chief Minister Dorjee Khandu to take action against the Bangladeshis. So what did he do? He pushed a couple of thousands to Assam and the matter ended. In Assam it created a furore. The Muslim bodies, specially the All Assam Minorities Students Union, threatened to oust Hindus from Muslim majority districts like Dhubri, Goalpara and Barpeta, so Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi ‘certified’ that all those ousted by the Arunachal Pradesh government are Assamese and shall be accommodated in Barpeta!

The situation is so serious and Delhi’s apathy so mindboggling that the people have lost all hope. The All Assam Students Union, which spearheaded an unprecedented movement in the 1980s to oust Bangladeshi infiltrators, has in utter desperation said that in the next ten years Assam may have a Bangladeshi chief minister. Strong and alarming words indeed. But neither the media nor the political parties paid any attention.

Assam has been transformed beyond recognition. The state’s cultural identity is symbolised by the great reformer and rejuvenator Srimat Sankar Dev. His birthlace in Dhing, near Bardowa, is a must-visit pilgrim centre for every Assamese Hindu. Now the Dhing assembly constituency has 90.02 percent Muslims. No prizes to guess how this Hindu pilgrim centre became a Muslim majority town because of the Bangladeshi influx.

Assam’s latest political star is Maulana Badruddin Ajmal, a perfume tycoon, who formed a new political party, the United Democratic Front, in 2005 and won 10 seats in the 2006 assembly election, surprising everyone. Previously he used to remote control other secular parties. Now he has taken the reins in his hands.

Assam and other northeastern states have become more volatile than Kashmir, but Delhi’s page three media and corrupt polity don’t see beyond their immediate concerns.

After Assam and Arunachal Pradesh, it is Nagaland’s turn now. Bangladeshi jihadi factories supplying men and material are creating havoc from Itanagar to Kohima and Hyderabad. They are there before everybody’s eyes, yet no government has shown a steely resolve to identify them and send them back. Aliens are turned into voters for political gain. The lines dividing traitors and patriots are getting blurred. Patriotic people need permits, they are made to live a refugee’s life, but aliens feel quite confident and vocal to aggressively enter our country, bomb it and yet find sympathies in the corridors of power.

In Nagaland, people are sandwiched between the insurgent groups and the Bangladeshi influx. The headquarters of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (Issac-Muivah group) is in Hebron, 30 odd kilometres from Dimapur. Everywhere, while going to Kohima one can see posters demanding ‘quick results of peace talks’ and a greater Nagalim which they want in the name of Christ — a separate independent country. According to government sources there are about 75,000 Bangladeshi Muslims in Nagaland today.

I had come to attend a seminar organised by a daring tribal organisation, the Janajati Vikas Samiti, which had invited about 80 participants from the northeastern states. Nagaland Home Minister Thenucho inaugurated the conference. Former state secretary C M Chang headed the organising committee. It was incredible to see so many tribal leaders engrossed in what can be termed a free discussion on the problems Nagaland faces — Bangladeshi infiltration being the foremost.

Minister Thenucho was forthcoming and said this problem has to be seen as a demographic invasion. ‘The Naga people may be soon reduced to miserable sufferers by these infiltrators, who may appear as an asset for providing cheap labour and easily available hands for menial jobs. But look what they have done elsewhere and there is no guarantee that they will not do the same here. Today they work as labourers; tomorrow Nagas will have to work for them, if we do not stand up and say no to them,’ the minister said. He was serious.

The only problem is the Centre does not share their anxieties. Nothing that binds Naga society with the rest of the country has ever been encouraged and strengthened. Natwar Thakkar started his Gandhi ashram in Mokukchang but could never expand his mission of spreading Gandhi’s sublime thoughts beyond that.

To be in Kohima is still considered a matter of fear, pregnant with life and death questions. There is no icon of India that can be seen here. In the early 1980s a Gandhi statue was installed in Kohima, only to be desecrated and destroyed soon. ‘Nagaland doesn’t need any Indian’s statue’ was the decree issued by the insurgents.

Almost everyone, from IAS officers to traders and teachers, have to cough up a part of their earnings to the insurgents. Their ‘freedom days’, ‘republic days’ are celebrated in full public view with the media from Kolkata and Delhi in attendance. Presently there is a ceasefire between the NSCN (IM) and the Indian Army, but rumours are afloat that this period has been better utilised by the insurgents to reinforce its battalions with new recruits, procure better weapons and resources to press for its demand for an ‘independent ‘Nagalim’, which seeks to ‘add’ parts of Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh to its fold.

This has enraged Manipuri and Arunachali tribals and a tribal war cannot be ruled out if the Naga insurgents’ demand is given any sympathy.

The press is lively but cocooned in its own world. “We have never been invited to join any prime minister’s party on his foreign visits, Delhi and Kolkata papers reach us very late, after a day or two, that too the dak edition,’ said Geoffrey Yaden, editor of the Nagaland Post, the main daily newspaper in the state. “They don’t understand us properly, they write to please their egos. Nobody has the time and interest to understand our people or to make serious efforts to create bridges and strengthen national feelings here. Are politicians sitting in Delhi are bothered about us or the nation?” he lamented.

I know it is very difficult to have a Delhi leader or social activist or cultural tsar to find time for a northeast visit. How many of us would go to Manipur or Nagaland or Arunachal for a family trip? Do we know that the most scintillating lakes, mountains, rivers and forests are in the northeast, bettering even Kashmir’s panorama? Unfortunately the northeast has yet to register in our minds as markedly as Hardwar, Manali, Goa  or Rameshwaram.

Corruption to the northeast’s politicians is ‘taught’ by politicians in New Delhi. Even to get a central grant released for these states, central ministers and their durbaris have to be suitably ‘pleased’. The grants that go to the northeast finally come back in large parts to the Delhi durbar through traders, contractors, commission agents and sanctioning ministers. The rest is divided amongst local ‘beneficiaries’, including the insurgents.

In view of the infiltration threat faced by Nagaland and other northeastern states, an observation by E Ramamohan, the former director general, Border Security Force, who was with me in Kohima, should be an eyeopener. He warns about the insurgent groups’ long-term planning for 2015 — “Today there are several Islamic fundamentalist insurgent groups in Assam, all created with the help of the Director General Forces Intelligence of Bangladesh and Pakistan’s Inter Services Intelligence. The main groups are the Muslim United Liberation Front of Assam, the Muslim United Tigers of Assam and the Islamic Liberation Army of Assam… what is most interesting that these Islamic fundamentalist groups have not started operations so far. Interrogations of the suspects and intelligence reports have revealed that they are in a preparation phase. Motivating and recruiting cadres, training them in Pakistan, stockpiling arms and explosives for the insurgency is their present strategy. The target is (to launch an assault) in 2015.”

Why can’t we understand that India shrinks from every inch that is occupied by Bangladeshi infiltrators in our territory? In less than 100 years India has shrunk like no other nation on earth.

We lost Taxila, Karachi, Dhaka. Post independence, we lost 1.25 lakh square kilometres of land to Pakistan and China. Beijing still eyes Arunachal Pradesh.

Then Indians lost lands and homes in the Kashmir valley and became refugees for the ‘sin’ of supporting India. Now, jihadis, Maoists and church-supported insurgents want their share. Where will this all lead to? All the power, position, money and glitter weigh nothing before the question of the nation’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. At least in the northeast, people feel nobody listens to their woes in Delhi.

Related posts:

Is Congress selling India to Pakistan?

Madrasa  = CBSE?

Threat of re-partitioning India?

National Liberation Front of Tripura

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.